Ottawa Champions – June 17

Even though I focus on the major leagues and minor leagues when I plan my road trips for The Ballpark Guide, I had my eye on a mid-June visit to Ottawa since the early spring. Why? Because the independent Can-Am League’s Ottawa Champions were hosting the Cuban National Team, and if that’s not a unique reason to head to the ballpark, I don’t know what is.

The Cuban squad, which is the same group of players that hosted the Tampa Bay Rays in Cuba during Spring Training, was scheduled to play a handful of games in North America, and I knew that I wanted to at least see the team in action once. This was a special occasion because it would mark the first time since 1954 that a Cuban team played baseball in Ottawa, Canada’s capital city. That team, the Havana Sugar Kings, is one that you’ve likely heard of if you know baseball history.

I visited Ottawa’s Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton Park once last season, as you might recall, and was eager to visit the former home of the International League’s Ottawa Lynx once again. I got to town a couple hours before first pitch to give me time to explore the stadium a bit, as well as get down to field level and watch the Cuban team warm up, which I was especially excited about.

Here’s how RCGT Park looks from the parking lot:

ottawa-champions-rcgt-park-outside

The ballpark was built in 1993 and while I’m generally not the biggest fan of the look of ’90s-era “bowl-style” stadiums, you’ve got to admit that the exterior of this one looks sharp. The combination of brick and silver looks cool, and I especially like the variety of colors of glass in the middle structure.

Although I was, as usual, eager to get inside the park, I wanted to take a quick look around the surrounding area. RCGT Park is located next to the highway, and there’s a modern pedestrian bridge …

ottawa-champions-rcgt-park-outside-bridge

… that runs between the stadium and close to one of Ottawa’s train stations, making the stadium easily accessible on foot if you decide to visit Ottawa by train.

The bridge provides a cool vantage point of the stadium, too, and I took this photo of the side of the building when I was standing at the entrance of the bridge:

ottawa-champions-rcgt-park-outside-1

From this spot, I could also hear that batting practice was taking place, so I decided to quickly head inside and check out the action on the field. To my surprise, it was the Ottawa side — not the Cuban team — that was hitting first. This is what the scene looked like after I made it through the concourse and to the cross-aisle behind the lower bowl seats:

ottawa-champions-first-field-view

I watched BP from the cross-aisle for a few minutes, before deciding to start walking around and surveying the park from various spots. My first mission was to head down the third base line to the large grass berm, which features a variety of seating options beyond actually sitting on the grass:

ottawa-champions-berm-and-chairs

The weather was super hot and sunny, and I was amused to see three members of the Champions getting a tiny bit of relief from the shadow of one of the light posts; one player seemed to be making sure that his arms were in the shade, too:

ottawa-champions-players-in-shade

There were a couple baseballs laying in the grass on the berm, but since the gates weren’t yet open, I didn’t want to take them — although I made a pledge to remember to return to the area once the park was open to all fans.

The Champions were kind enough to hook me up with a press pass, which gave me field access. Although I’ve been on professional fields a ton of times, the thrill never gets old — and I wanted to be standing behind the batting cage when the Cuba side began to hit. I took a spot on the visitors’ side of the field and enjoyed the action for several minutes with this view:

ottawa-champions-bp

Ottawa wasn’t showing any sign of giving up its BP just yet, which meant that the Cuban hitters probably wouldn’t take the field for a while, so I decided to head to the upper row on the first base side and snap this panorama:

ottawa-champions-rcgt-park-pano-upper-deck

When I got some reprieve from the sun by standing against the cement wall between the upper deck and suites, I saw this sign and had to laugh:

ottawa-champions-sign

It reminded me of a time that I broke this very rule myself — way back during a chilly April doubleheader in Syracuse.

A few minutes later, the Champions left the field, so I went up to check out the press box during the break in the action. Here’s the view from up there:

ottawa-champions-early-press-box-view

You can see the grass berm I visited earlier on the left side of the photo; there’s no berm down near the right field foul pole, as the stadium’s batting cages are in that area instead. I also want to draw your attention to Coventry Road, which passes behind the left field fence. The road is less than 50 feet from the outfield fence, so long home runs definitely have a chance of reaching it. Additionally, you’ll often see passers-by lining the chain-link fence behind the berm on game nights, as there’s a good view of the field from the sidewalk.

I spent a few minutes in the press box enjoying the view, and then headed back down to the main concourse. By this time, a pair of horses and riders were taking laps around the warning track. Certainly not something you see every day at the ballpark, right? In fact, I think this is probably the first time I’ve seen horses on the field at any of the 60-plus parks I’ve visited. I quickly descended to the field and snapped this picture of one of the horses and its rider …

ottawa-champions-horse-2

… and then shot this one of the other horse and rider:

ottawa-champions-horse

I watched the horses take a bunch of laps around the field, but that was about it for the action down at field level. The Champions were in the clubhouse, and the Cuban side seemed conspicuously absent; I hadn’t seen a single player wearing a Cuban uniform, despite first pitch being on the not-so-distant horizon. I figured the national team was still in its clubhouse, but when I went back to the press box and talked to a couple members of the Champions broadcast team, I learned that the club had yet to arrive! Apparently, the Cuban bus had experienced some sort of problem on the way to Ottawa. We learned that the team was scheduled to get to town in time, but that it wouldn’t be hitting, unfortunately.

When the gates opened, I went back down to the berm where I’d previously seen the ball, and snagged it:

ottawa-champions-baseball

I love the black bat smudge on this one. I grabbed another baseball, too, and gave it away to a little boy midway through the game.

A little while later, I saw a positive sign out the press box window — a coach bus wrapped in Cuban colors backing up to the stadium:

ottawa-champions-cuba-bus-arriving

The players actually came off the bus wearing their uniforms, so I quickly bid farewell to the press box and returned to field level to watch the warm-ups. I really enjoy watching international baseball, so it was a thrill to be standing next to these Cuban pros, and I took a ton of photos, like this one of some players stretching:

cuba-national-team-players-1

And this one:

cuba-national-team-players

That’s catcher Yosvani Alarcon in the foreground and a teammate whose #35 doesn’t appear to be on the official roster in the background.

Here’s Osvaldo Vazquez, another catcher, who seemed to be posing for me:

osvaldo-vazquez-cuba-national-team

And Jefferson Delgado, an infielder:

jefferson-delgado-cuba-national-team

And Raul Gonzalez, another infielder:

raul-gonzalez-cuba-nationa-team

Next, I witnessed a reunion of sorts. I was standing in front of the visitors’ bullpen down the first base line, when a couple of the Champions players approached and embraced several of the Cuban guys. The two players, Donal Duarte and Alexander Malleta, signed with Ottawa earlier this season after long careers as professionals in Cuba, playing on the island since 2001 and 1998, respectively. Here’s Duarte with some members of the Cuban team:

ottawa-champions-duarte-reunion

There was definitely a unique buzz in the ballpark with the Cuban team in town, and it was an experience I won’t soon forget. It just felt … different, but it was also neat to realize that despite all the differences between North America and Cuba, baseball is just baseball. From that perspective, things on the field didn’t feel very different at all. Of course, there were always constant reminders of the special nature of the night, like this selection of Team Cuba gear in the visitors’ bullpen:

ottawa-champions-cuba-bullpen-bags

As the Cubans wrapped up their truncated on-field drills, and first pitch approached, I set off in search of something to eat. Well, it was more of a beeline walk than a meandering wander — straight to the poutine kiosk on the first base side. I’d eaten a tremendously good order of poutine a year earlier, and even though I like to vary my ballpark food to try as many things as possible, I knew there was no way I wasn’t going to partake again.

While I waited in line, I noticed that the Champions offer a team-branded craft beer, which I thought was neat — especially at the independent level:

ottawa-champions-beer

As I did a season earlier, I ordered the “Tao Poutine,” an Asian-inspired dish with breaded chicken, hot sauce, diced green onions and black and white sesame seeds atop the poutine mainstays of fries, cheese curds and gravy:

ottawa-champions-food-tao-poutine

It was absolutely delicious once again, and for $5.75, it was a heck of a lot of food. It might seem like a random comment, but I was also hugely impressed with the attention to detail of the food services worker making the meal for me. All the poutine is made to order, which means that there can occasionally be a bit of a lineup. One young man was handling all the assembly, and while he was working quickly, he was also putting a great amount of care into putting the orders together. With mine, for example, he sprinkled some green onions on top, held the container out to inspect it, and then sprinkled just a couple more to top it up. That type of care is impressive and appreciated, and I can tell you this from experience; there have been too many times that I’ve had my food thrust at me at various stadiums with barely a grunt and absolutely no interest in the task at hand. It’s a thumbs up for the Champions, and I hope other fans have had this experience, too.

I mowed through my food during the pregame ceremonies, which included lots of photos and first pitches, and was intrigued with what I saw next: After the two national anthems were played, the Champions and Cuban National Team moved through the infield and shook hands. I don’t know if this is the norm in Cuba, or if it was just to celebrate the moment, but it was a nice scene of solidarity:

ottawa-champions-pregame-handshakes

As the players wrapped up their handshakes, the two horse riders (carrying Canada and Cuba flags) took a fast run along the outfield warning track …

ottawa-champions-horses-on-track

… and then it was finally time to play ball. I settled into a standing-room spot behind the visitors’ dugout:

ottawa-champions-cuba-dugout

You probably know by now that I enjoy watching each game I attend from numerous vantage points, so as much as it was fun to hang out behind the Cuban team and watch the goings-on, I wanted to find a different spot for the bottom of the first inning. I settled on the berm when I’d previously found the BP balls, and I think you’ll agree that it provides a great view of the ballpark:

ottawa-champions-berm-view

Did you notice the Cuba flag hanging from one of the suites in the above photo? If not, here’s a closer shot:

ottawa-champions-cuba-flag-suites

There was one hanging over the visitors’ dugout rail, too, although it faced in the wrong direction from where I was standing:

ottawa-champions-cuba-team-dugout

I spent the next stretch of time watching an inning here, an inning there, and enjoying all of it. Here’s my view from the press box:

ottawa-champions-rcgt-stadium-press-box-view

And a panorama from the cross-aisle behind home plate:

ottawa-champions-rcgt-park-pano-behind-plate

Here’s an action shot I took an inning or two later, which shows something cool — the grounds crew had painted Champions and Team Cuba logos in the dirt behind home plate:

ottawa-champions-field-logos

Later in the game, Cuba had reliever Frank Medina warming in the bullpen, so I made my way over to the front row at the fence and snapped some shots like this …

frank-medina-cuba-national-team-1

With Medina on the mound soon after, I spent the last part of the game from this spot, watching Ottawa cruise to a 6-1 win:

ottawa-champions-night

I left quickly after the game wrapped up, snapping this panorama of the exterior of the ballpark on my way out:

ottawa-champions-rcgt-park-pano-outside-night

As was the case last year, I was highly impressed with my visit to RCGT Park. Currently, the Champions are tied 1-1 in the first round of the Can-Am League playoffs with the New Jersey Jackals, whose ballpark I visited back in 2013 to see my friend Jeremy Nowak play. If the Champions are able to advance, I’m going to try to catch another game — and get some more of that poutine.

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5 comments

      • Malcolm - TheBallparkGuide

        I personally can’t see Triple-A ball working in Ottawa again, but it’s nice to see that the Champions have a good following and are doing well. I was actually at one of the games in the finals. I’ll have that blog up when I get caught up!
        Malcolm

      • Mark Gauthier

        Nice! It’s unfortunate but you’re probably right. Baseball’s not a hot commodity in Ottawa and quite frankly, they blew their chances at getting a Double A team. Beacon Sports needed 40 million in upgrades to the park before moving the Mets “B”‘s but Ottawa didn’t want to spend taxpayers money. This was a few years ago before the Jays went on their run. They would have been affiliated with the Blue Jays and in hindsight a gold mine. Canada’s in love with baseball again. Instead, Ottawa kicked out their Independent League team Fat Cats, who were averaging 2000 a game to make room for a possible double A team. When everything fell through, Ottawa might have well said,”I know we promised you affiliated ball, but here’s a Can Am League team instead” I think they should spent the money but I’m happy the Champions won but it wasn’t fair how the City of Ottawa did it. If Montreal gets another franchise, I’d expect a Triple A team back in the capital. The Lynx did very well when they were affiliated with Montreal.

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