Colorado Rockies – September 19

Want to guess what time I got up on my first morning in Denver?

If you guessed 3:45 a.m. local time, you’d be right.

Now, before you label me a sleep-deprived maniac, let me tell you two things — my body was clearly still on east coast time, and I was thrilled to be in a new city for three days of baseball at my 63rd different ballpark. Deciding that I wouldn’t wake my wife like a tot on Christmas morning, I quietly let myselfout of our hotel room and went down to the lobby of the Westin Denver Downtown. My wife and I hadn’t done much exploring of the hotel the night before, and I was itching to check out some of the amenities. It’s definitely one of the nicest hotels I’ve stayed at over the years, so I’m anxious to share some pictures over my next few blog posts.

My first stop was the super-cool pool deck that you might’ve seen me post about on Instagram during my trip. It’s probably my favorite feature at the hotel, as it’s the first pool I’ve seen that is part indoors, and part outdoors — and, as you might guess, it was pretty quiet about 4 a.m.:

After walking around the hotel a bit, I set out for an early morning walk, anxious to smell the mountain air before the streets got busy with vehicles. The Westin is situated in the heart of Denver in an area known as the 16th Street Mall. The mall is an open-air pedestrian mall that’s more than one mile long and stocked with 300+ stores and 50+ restaurant. You can’t actually drive down 16th Street (although I mistakenly did the day before — but that’s another story) so it’s a great place for pedestrians and tourists to browse. Anyway, I walked around the mall a bit and then zigzagged my way through some of the neighboring streets, noting some eye-catching scenery like this:

Once I’d walked for a bit, I returned to the lobby to hang out until my wife arrived, and then we went back to our room in time to watch the Rocky Mountains come into focus, which was absolutely amazing:

If you’re visiting Denver for any reason and book a room at the Westin Denver Downtown, make sure ask for a room that faces the mountains. As you know, I’m a sucker for a hotel room with a view, and it’s certainly tough to top a mountain range! While the mountains were certainly the star attraction out the window of our room, it was also impressive to see Sports Authority Field at Mile High, home of the NFL’s Denver Broncos, and Pepsi Center, home of the NHL’s Colorado Avalanche. Can you spot the two stadiums in the photo above? Let me know in the comments below.

After having breakfast near the hotel, my wife and I did a handful of touristy things around the city, but once mid-afternoon arrived, it was time to head back to the hotel and get ready to walk over to Coors Field. My wife, meanwhile, had a different plan, and hopped in our rental car and drove off to check out the Denver Botanic Gardens. She’s not the biggest baseball fan, but to be fair, if we’d traveled to Denver to see the botanic gardens, I might’ve sneaked off to a ballgame.

I loaded my camera stuff into my backpack and began the short walk from the Westin to Coors Field, getting more excited with each city block that I put behind me. Soon enough, the glorious ballpark came into view, and I snapped this panorama from across the street:

I was immediately impressed with the exterior beauty of the park, but it was just the tip of the iceberg (or tip of the mountain, perhaps?) in terms of how I felt about the look of this ballpark. Admittedly, Colorado isn’t a team I watch on TV very much; I live on the east coast, so most of the Rockies games aren’t at an ideal time, and I don’t follow the National League as much as I do the American League. This meant that I was in for plenty of positive surprises throughout my entire visit to Denver, starting before I even entered the ballpark.

As you can see from this photo …

… I got to Coors Field just after 4 p.m., which was well in advance of the gates opening. That was part of my plan, though, as I wanted to wander around the exterior for a bit. I’ve mentioned in other blog posts that I love red brick ballparks, so it was a thrill to simply walk the exterior perimeter of Coors Field and enjoy the mammoth structure towering over my left shoulder:

The streets around the ballpark were still fairly quiet …

… but the energy picked up by the time I made it around to the center field gate, although at least half of the fans waiting in line were St. Louis Cardinals fans (and one confused guy with a Rockies jersey and Cardinals cap). I hung out in the line for just a little bit, and soon enough, I was through the gates (and metal detectors, ugh), up the stairs, and onto the concourse:

Wooo! Look at those lovely wide concourses — I love the feel of big concourses that aren’t claustrophobic. There are a handful of MLB parks that are simply too confined, and while tight confines might have their own charm, I’ll always favor those that don’t make me feel like a sardine.

I made my way through the concourse until I got to the natural landscape area beyond the fence in straightaway center — wow!

I’d obviously seen this area on TV, but didn’t get a true appreciation until I saw it in person. Just imagine the sound of the fountains mixed with the music wafting over the stadium speakers, the cracks of the bats from batting practice and the shouts of the players on the field. I was in heaven.

After taking in the natural oasis for a few minutes, I hustled over to the adjacent bleacher seats and snapped this panorama:

(The haziness you see on the right of the image is barbecue smoke — more on that later.)

As I stood there and basked in the view, I was feeling pretty darned lucky to be spending three days in Denver.

I didn’t bother with trying to snag a BP ball. Instead, I took a walk along the outfield concourse, noting all the delicious food options that I’d be undoubtedly diving into — if not during my first game, then definitely over the next couple days.

I also scoped out the play area in the left field corner, which is a must-visit spot if you’re taking in a game at Coors Field with kids:

Next, I shot this photo of the Rockpile section in center field to give you an idea of what it looks like:

This ended up being a spot in which I’d spend plenty of time over the next three days. It provides a fantastic view of the playing field, and its prices are dirt cheap — certainly among the best I’ve ever seen in the major leagues. Seeing this section made me think about my favorite unique seating sections in baseball. Let’s just take the major leagues — let me know about your favorite spots, and why, in the comments section. (And, after I’ve received a few comments, I’ll chime in with my favorite spots, too!)

By now, I’d spent a fair bit of time checking out the scenes around center field, but had yet to make my way toward the home plate concourse. That obviously had to change, so I set out to walk down the concourse on the third base side — stopping to enjoy this perfect scene for a few minutes before I went:

One cool sight that I saw (and visited during each of my three games at Coors Field) was the game-used kiosk along the concourse. If you’ve read this blog for a while, you’ll know that I love collecting game-used gear when I can, so I took in the Rockies game-used selection of bases, helmets, jerseys, bats and balls with great interest:

The one knock on the kiosk? There were no prices listed for anything, which made it annoying to browse the available options without any idea of whether anything was good value or not. Of course, this certainly wasn’t enough to sour my mood, so after browsing for several minutes, I continued through the concourse …

… until I made it to the Blue Moon Brewery at the Sandlot. You probably know Blue Moon beer, right? Well, it was originally created by the Sandlot Brewery, located in Coors Field. (In fact, it was originally known as Bellyslide Belgian White, which is something I learned on my Coors Field tour the next day.) Anyway, Coors has since bought the brand, and the beer is still brewed at the brewery inside the ballpark. And, in the photo you’ll see below, there’s a smokehouse restaurant attached to the brewery that sells all sorts of tasty fare — and offers seating right along the edge of the concourse, too:

Once I’d wandered around the home plate area for a bit, I headed back to the outfield to climb atop the Rockpile section. As I said earlier, it provides a perfect view of the field, but you’ll also see that this vantage point gives you a great impression of the stadium overall, and even the Denver skyline in the distance:

I spent several minutes just standing there and taking in the sights. Just being at a ballpark always makes me smile, so it’s nice to occasionally slow down and breathe the (mountain) air a bit.

Of course, I was also itching to do more exploring of Coors Field, so I made my way behind home plate, climbed all the way up to the top row of the upper deck, and snapped this photo:

And here’s the scene as a panorama:

Since I was already on the upper level, I wanted to check out Coors Field’s newest big attraction, The Rooftop. It’s a two-level bar/eatery/hangout that is nearly 40,000 square feet in size and not only provides panoramic views of the field and stadium, but of the city’s skyline, as well. Here’s how this area looks from across the way:

As I made my way onto The Rooftop and began to marvel at the sights, another sight caught my eye — my enormous head on the video board! I definitely did a double take when I looked up and saw a screenshot of one of the tweets I’d sent when I arrived at Coors Field. I’ve been lucky to be on the video board at a few ballparks over the years, but this was definitely the biggest I’d ever seen myself:

Several fans’ images were cycling through, so I’d see myself, then wait for a few minutes for other photos to cycle through, and there I’d be again. Hilariously, though, the cycling stopped at my photo at one point — it was as though the program running the images had frozen. And that meant that my face was fixed on the video board for maybe three or four minutes straight. I couldn’t resist scurrying to a different spot of The Rooftop and snapping another shot:

I didn’t actually spend too long up in this location on this day, but I devoted a lot of time to The Rooftop during my visit the next day. For now, though, I went back down to the main concourse, headed behind home plate, and enjoyed watching the Coors Field grounds crew finish the last of the pregame field prep as the seats slowly began to fill:

I love the look of a ballpark as the sun begins to set, which is something that occurred earlier than I’m used to on this visit. September 19 is among the latest I’ve ever attended an outdoor baseball game since I started my travels, which meant that the sun was already low in the sky before first pitch. That was fine with me, though, as I provided great views like this one of right-center and The Rooftop:

The game soon began, and after watching the first inning from the center field concourse, I decided that I was time to eat — based on my food-scouting mission from earlier, I felt that a made-to-order burger, onion rings and a shake from the nearby Helton Burger Shack were in order. Can’t go wrong with that choice, right?

Well, that wouldn’t be in the cards, as evidenced by this sign:

I’m not sure which player hit the bomb that sabotaged my dinner plans, but no worries — it was an interesting occurrence and brought back memories of a 2014 visit to New Hampshire’s Northeast Delta Dental Stadium. As I was watching batting practice, a home run sailed over my head and smashed a window of the adjacent hotel. I snapped a photo of the broken window and it got shared a lot on social media. If you’re interested in that story, you can find my blog post about it here.

Anyway, I certainly wouldn’t have enjoyed a glass shard-filled burger, so I’m glad that the powers that be decided to close the Helton concession stand. That meant that I needed a new choice for dinner, and the choice was easy. I’d noticed the Famous Dave’s Bar-B-Que concession stand earlier — in part because the delicious smoke that was wafting through the concourse was impossible to ignore. There was a long lineup at Famous Dave’s, which is always a good sign. I ordered a pound of Memphis dry rub rib tips, and while I’m not the hugely rib fan in the world, these looked too good to pass up:

They were delicious. The rub was the perfect blend of seasonings and the sweetness of the barbecue sauce I added to my container for dipping purposes complemented the smokiness of the rib tips perfectly. Definitely a meal worth getting when you visit Coors Field.

Of course, that wasn’t the only thing I bought from Famous Dave’s. For “dessert,” I washed down my rib tips with three slices of chocolate-dipped bacon; I’d never previously tried chocolate-dipped bacon, and couldn’t pass up the opportunity. So, so delicious:

After I’d eaten (and enjoyed a post-rib and bacon rest) I realized that there’s another big incentive to the Rockpile section. If you sit atop it, and turn to your right, you’ll have a perfect view of the sun setting over the Rockies. The view was so good that probably 20 or so fans came up to where I was sitting and shot photos of the scene; it was just too beautiful to pass up. As for my photos, here are a couple that show the progression of the sunset:

Once the sun was down, I made my way around this guy (who, in fairness, was just retrieving the cellphone he’d dropped) …

… to go grab a frozen lemonade, which I ate on the Rockpile:

Next, I watched an inning from this spot …

… and noted just how accommodating the Coors Field ushers were. At some parks, you’ll get shooed away if you stand in this area for more than a couple seconds, but the local ushers weren’t hassling anyone. As long as the cross-aisle was kept clear for people to walk, the ushers had no problem with fans watching the action from this spot. Definitely another check mark for Coors Field in my books.

As the game progressed, I decided to make another visit to the upper deck, so I took a long elevator ride …

… and a few moments later, I was exactly a mile above sea level. How did I know? Check out this cool Coors Field feature — see the purple beam? That mark is 5,280 feet, or one mile, above sea level:

I caught the game’s final innings from a seat that provided this spectacular view:

And, once the final out had been recorded, I made my way back down to street level, having a quick chuckle at this sign …

… and made the short walk back to my hotel, where I fell into bed eagerly anticipating my second full day in Denver.

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