Binghamton Rumble Ponies – May 18

Less than 24 hours after leaving Binghamton’s NYSEG Stadium following my first visit since 2011, I was back in the car and pulling into the Eastern League ballpark’s parking lot for some matinee action.

I always find matinee games awesome on my baseball road trips. In some instances, they provide a full nine innings of daylight, which is great for photographs, a quiet evening off and an opportunity to catch up on blogging in my hotel. At other times, they give me a chance to see a stadium for a second time before hitting the road again. This time, I’d be heading home after the game, but was glad for the follow-up opportunity to see the Rumble Ponies again host the Altoona Curve at NYSEG Stadium.

My first game’s experience, which you might have read about here, was excellent. As I said in my last post, the changes that have recently been made to the ballpark made for a much better fan experience than when I last visited six years ago.

A day earlier, I’d enjoyed snagging a couple batting practice home runs in the parking lot. Given the 10:30 a.m. start time on this day, however, I knew that BP wouldn’t be in the cards. Instead of hanging out in the parking lot again, I immediately entered through Gate 1 and headed over to the new picnic area behind the fence in right field. In my previous blog post, I showed you the view from this spot — but not a full shot of how the spot itself looks. Check it out:

I can imagine this being a thrilling place during a home run. The ball would ricochet like crazy on the asphalt and likely bounce off the rounded building, too. If there were a bunch of fans in the area, it’d be fun a scramble to see who could come up with the baseball. (There ended up being one home run ball land in this spot later in the game, but I was unfortunately sitting on the opposite side of the park at the time. It’s too bad, too, because there weren’t any fans using the picnic tables when the home run was hit. A lone fan sauntered over to the area to easily pick up the baseball.)

As I said, batting practice wasn’t taking place, but that didn’t mean that the field was empty. Many players on each team were on their respective sides of the field and and were just starting to warm up, so I began my second day at NYSEG Stadium by standing in the shade under the party deck down the first base line and watching the scene. One funny thing that I noticed was a Rumble Ponies player sitting on one of the field-level seats and impersonating a silly batting stance while a teammate laughed:

Speaking of that party deck, that’s where I headed next. I wanted a bird’s-eye view of the field and the warmups below me, as you’ll see in this shot of the mostly empty ballpark …

… and this one of a Rumble Ponies team meeting taking place:

Next, I headed to the opposite side of the field to check out another new seating area. I hadn’t visited this spot a day earlier, and while it might not have all the bells and whistles of the new party deck I’d just been standing on, it’s an awesome spot to watch a ballgame. This new area consists of tables and chairs that are protected by netting, as well as bar-style seating at field level:

Since I apparently cannot stand still for long when I’m at a ballpark, my next stop was back where I’d been standing earlier. By now, the Binghamton players were playing catch, and I watched the action for a few minutes before noticing a scene that shows just how solitary gameday can be for the starting pitcher. Here’s Rumble Ponies starter PJ Conlon, more than an hour before first pitch, standing by himself against the center field fence and stretching:

Once I’d watched the Binghamton warmups for a few minutes, I once again returned to the visitors’ side to see Altoona. Remember the new seating area from two photos ago? I took a spot at field level, which put me just a few yards from the closest Curve players. Not 30 seconds after arriving, a Curve player walked over toward me and I realized it was outfielder Connor Joe, Pittsburgh’s 30th-ranked prospect and the same player who’d said hello before the game a day earlier. I could tell he was reading the lettering on my new T-shirt and taking it in.

“Cool shirt,” he told me. “What’s The Ballpark Guide?” I was once again a little surprised at being approached by a player, but excited to tell him a little about my site. Seemingly hearing the conversation between his teammate and me, Curve shortstop Kevin Newman, the third-ranked prospect in the Pittsburgh Pirates organization, turned around and read my shirt aloud: “Fastballs and walkoffs and hot dogs and road trips.”

As this was happening, I was telling Joe how I’d been to 64 different stadiums, but I suggested that he’d probably played at more throughout all the years of his baseball career, and he laughed. Soon enough, he waved and headed back to the field. The whole exchange lasted less than a minute, but it was pretty cool. I made up my new T-shirts just before this trip with the hope of having them catch peoples’ eyes, and the thought that two players were commenting on the design was an unexpected thrill.

Of course, now I had a pair of new players to add to my “players with whom I’ve had a cool interaction and now I cheer for them” list, so I got busy snapping some shots of both Joe and Newman. Here’s one of Joe that turned out well:

And one of Newman:

Although I was mostly watching Joe and Newman, something unusual caught my eye. Altoona shortstop Pablo Reyes was wearing his Oakley sunglasses upside down on his face. I thought he might’ve just been doing it for a joke, and I’m sure he was to some extent, but they remained in place while he played catch. It was a bizarre sight, but one that definitely made me smile:

In fact, I thought this sight was so bizarre that I submitted it for consideration in ESPN’s Uni Watch blog, and it got included. Here’s the tweet that I sent:

And here’s a screenshot of the part of the Uni Watch blog post that mentions my submission:

By the way, the photo of Reyes may make it appear as though he was just wearing his shades upside down while standing around, but he was actually wearing them that way while playing catch. Here’s proof:

After I’d finished watching the oddity with Reyes, I shifted by attention back to Joe and Newman, who appeared to be having a good time toward the end of warmups:

When warmups wrapped up and first pitch approached, I went back over to the Rumble Ponies side of the field for a few minutes. While there, I snapped this shot during the national anthem …

… and then took a spot in the first row above the Altoona dugout to shoot some action shots of players. Here’s Curve starting pitcher Yeudy Garcia, who’s the #12 prospect in the Pirates system:

Here’s Champ Stuart, who hit the first foul ball I snagged a day earlier, just after laying down a bunt:

And, since we’re talking about those foul balls from my first game in Binghamton, here’s Luis Guillorme, who hit the second one I snagged:

The next inning, Altoona outfielder Jordan Luplow got hit by a pitch, and I snapped this shot just after the ball made contact:

The HBP was sort of interesting, although I’m sure Luplow would beg to differ. He had absolutely crushed a home run the previous night, and while I hadn’t noticed if he’d watched it a little too long or done something else to get under the opposition’s skin, the beanball made it obvious that Binghamton wasn’t pleased. In fact, the intentional nature of the pitch was so evident that one of the Curve coaching staff yelled out a warning to Conlon, “You’ve got to hit, too,” and then may have used two-part curse word.

There’s no way Conlon didn’t hear what was yelled, but he didn’t react. I was ready for some fireworks when he came up to bat, but it wasn’t payback time on this day. Speaking of Conlon, here’s a shot I snapped just after his delivery a few pitches after hitting Luplow:

After watching innings one and two from behind the dugout, I opted for a change of scenery and found it on one of the picnic tables in the right field corner. I was determined to spend some time there in the hopes of snagging another home run ball for my collection. I spent about an inning and a half with this view …

… but nothing came my way.

Eager for a little shade, I decided to take a walk through the covered concourse under the seats to check out some of the historical plaques recognizing those enshrined in Binghamton’s baseball hall of fame. This part of NYSEG Stadium might initially go unnoticed because of its location, but it’s a must-see area. (Although, I’d love to see it somewhere with a little more visibility, given that there are plaques recognizing many all-time greats of the game who have a connection to Binghamton.) One name that I thought was notable was that of Bud Fowler. His name isn’t one that I recognize, but Fowler was the first African-American player to play professional baseball. He suited up for the International Association’s Binghamton Crickets in 1887 and hit .350.

My short walk through Binghamton baseball history lasted about half an inning, although I could’ve spent longer reading all the plaques. I wanted to get back out to the seats to enjoy some more action, and settled into a seat behind home plate, where I had this view:

After an inning in that spot, I took a front-row seat above the Binghamton dugout to shoot a few more action shots. Here’s L.J. Mazzilli, the home run hero from a night earlier, ducking out of the way of a pitch …

… and then making square contact a couple pitches later to hit his first triple of the season:

Later in the inning, Stuart hit a single. Altoona was careful to keep Stuart from getting a big lead, given his speed. The result was a number of pick-off attempts, and I had a great view for them:

The throws must’ve worked; Stuart did indeed try to swipe second base, but was tossed out by Altoona catcher Zane Chavez:

(I like how first baseman Edwin Espinal is making the “out” sign at the same time as the umpire.)

The next inning, I shot this image of Altoona’s Reyes who was batting without his lucky upside-down sunglasses …

… and Rumble Ponies reliever Luis Mateo, looking skyward after coming off the mound following a one-inning outing:

I spent the game’s final innings once again in the right field corner hoping for a home run ball:

Again, though, nothing came my way. That didn’t do anything to dampen an excellent two days in Binghamton. After my disappointment in 2011, I was really hoping that I’d enjoy this visit — but had no idea things would’ve changed for the better to this degree. Now, I’m eagerly looking forward to returning to Binghamton for some Rumble Ponies baseball, whenever that may be. And if you’re remotely in the area, I wholeheartedly recommend that you make a stop at NYSEG Stadium, too.

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