Can-Am League/American Association All-Star Game – July 25

I’ve had the opportunity to enjoy some pretty cool experiences since I began traveling for The Ballpark Guide in 2010, but one thing that has always eluded me was an all-star game. Fortunately, that drought came to an end late in July, when I had the fortune of visiting Ottawa for the all-star game between the best of the Can-Am League and American Association.

Unlike most all-star events that pit the best players in an individual league against each other, this game was unique in that it consisted of all-stars from a pair of independent leagues — the six-team Can-Am League and the 12-team American Association — competing against each other. I’d actually planned to take in the home run derby and skills competition a day earlier, too, but daylong rain meant those activities were a wash. That was unfortunate, but the bright skies on July 25 meant that the all-star game thankfully wouldn’t be threatened by Mother Nature.

My ballpark visits normally revolve around exploring the ballpark, sitting in a bunch of different spots and trying to come up with some unique adventures, but the priority on this night was simply to take in my first all-star game. Don’t get me wrong — there was still some exploring and a chance to do something I’d never done before on the agenda.

I got to Ottawa’s Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton Park about 3 p.m. and went down to the field a little before the Can-Am League all-stars began hitting. Since I’d missed out on seeing long bombs due to the derby cancellation a day earlier, I was excited to see the league’s top home run hitters pounding balls over the fences at RCGT Park. One such slugger was Rockland Boulders first baseman/outfield Joe Maloney, who was a 10th round pick of Texas and also played as high as Double-A in Minnesota’s system:

Judging by the season he had with Rockland, you have to wonder if he’ll be back in affiliated ball again. He slugged 35 home runs, drove in 101, batted .282 and had an OPS of .997. And, lest you think that his offensive game is one dimensional, he also contributed with 18 stolen bases.

Another hitter I was anxious to see was Quebec Capitales outfielder Kalian Sams, who played affiliated ball in the Seattle, Texas and San Diego systems between 2007 and 2013:

His numbers this season were also impressive, especially considering that he only played in 72 games — 23 home runs, 70 RBIs, a .291 batting average and an OPS of .943.

Maloney and Sams lived up to their billing, as did many of the other Can-Am League hitters, including Ottawa’s own catcher Danny Grauer. Ottawa isn’t a hitter-friendly park, but it was impressive to see balls sailing well over the fence, including some moon shots that landed on Coventry Road beyond left field.

The American Association players soon took the field, and while I must admit that I didn’t recognize many of their names, one player I did know was starting pitcher Mark Hamburger. If you don’t know his story, it’s an interesting one. He’s certainly one of the more colorful characters in independent baseball, as you might get the sense from this photo:

After the Can-Am League batting practice ended but before the American Association guys began to hit, I zipped up to the press box to catch the scene from a bird’s-eye view:

Then, I headed back down to the field and just enjoyed watching the various players go in and out of the cage to my right. One player I spoke to was Martin Medina, a former White Sox and Blue Jays farmhand who currently catches for the Wichita Wingnuts:

I asked him about his perspectives on visiting Ottawa for the first time, and he admitted that many of the AA all-stars had arrived so late that they’d come straight to the ballpark. In fact, the American Association roster was a little short due to some players’ travel issues — so short that Ottawa Champions infielder Daniel Bick got called in to suit up for the American Association.

After BP, I joined my brother and nephew down the third base line. They’d decided to take in the event with me, and my nephew was just a tad excited:

OK, so maybe he was excited about the prospect of trying to get a baseball and chowing down on hot dogs and ice cream, but you get my point.

Our seats adjacent to the home bullpen meant that we got a chance to see the familiar faces of the Ottawa guys and a bunch of other Can-Am League all-stars. Here’s New Jersey Jackals outfielder Johnny Bladel, who had a spectacular year at the plate, hitting .345:

And the aforementioned Grauer, who was recently named the team’s most valuable player:

Grauer wasn’t the only all-star starter from Ottawa. Former big leaguer Phillippe Aumont, who I saw throw a no-hitter earlier in the season, was starting on the mound for the Can-Am side:

Speaking of Aumont, I went to the cross-aisle behind home plate to watch the game’s first pitch:

It was a little disappointing to see so many empty seats. I mean, there was still a decent crowd on hand, but for the caliber of baseball being showcased that night, as well as the rarity of the occasion (the first baseball all-star game ever hosted in the city) it’s regrettable that more Ottawa residents didn’t attend. The Champions did an exemplary job of putting on the entire all-star event, and it would’ve been nice if more baseball fans had come out to enjoy the evening.

I wanted to watch some of the game from a different vantage point, so I went out through the front gates and walked around the perimeter of the park until I arrived in the driveway behind the visitor’s bullpen and the batting cages. This is where the visiting team’s bus parks, and it’s somewhere I hadn’t really explored in the past. The view of the game from this spot isn’t great — and that’s fine, because there aren’t any seats there, anyway — but it was neat to actually be behind the bullpen:

While I was standing in this area, Hamburger (who’d since finished his work for the evening) took a walk down to the ‘pen and mugged for the fans sitting nearby. What a character:

I watched an inning from this spot, partially hoping that one of the right fielders would make a play along the fence or that a foul ball would come my way. Neither happened, but something better took place — I was speaking for a few minutes with a member of the RCGT Park grounds crew, and he casually asked if I wanted to go up to the roof. It obviously didn’t take me long to ponder that offer or give him my answer, so we made plans to meet at the end of the sixth inning so that I could check out this uncharted territory.

That gave me a bit of time to continue checking out the game from various angles, while also occasionally dropping in on my brother and nephew. The next spot I visited was the camera platform in straightaway center field. I’d previously checked out this spot before the Champions game against Cuba, but never during a game itself. I was surprised to run into a security guard standing in front of the ramp to the game — but kind of glad, too, because I’ve occasionally seen freeloaders sneak onto the RCGT Park property and watch the game from this spot without buying a ticket. He was cool with me taking a few photos, so I took shots like this one …

… and majorly hoped for a home run ball to come my way. That didn’t happen, but by the time I made it over to visit with my brother and nephew again, four-year-old Ben had himself a nice baseball. And, as you can tell from this photo, he was pretty stoked:

Champions pitcher Daniel Cordero handed it to him, thus keeping Ben’s streak alive — he’s gotten at least one baseball at every game he’s been to. (And the streak has continued in the games he’s attended since the all-star game, for the record.)

I still had a bit of time until my rooftop adventure, so I grabbed a Fan Club Burger from the home plate concession stand and sat in the upper seats on the third base side to enjoy it:

This was the second time I’d eaten that burger at RCGT Park, and it was just as outstanding as the first time. A huge thumbs up to the Champions and their food services team for producing a burger this delicious.

After the last bite of the burger, I went down to the grounds crew’s office to meet up with my new friend/tour guide.

I’ve only ever been on the roof of a ballpark once. That was back in 2014 when I attended the last game in Jamestown Jammers history. That rooftop experience was cool, but the Jammers played in a small park, so I was basically just going up onto a platform atop the tiny press box. This would be different — RCGT Park is an actual stadium with a legitimate roof, so I knew I’d be in a for a treat. We rode the elevator up to the press level, then took a set of stairs up to the roof. The first thing I did was go right up to the edge and shoot this photo:

It felt a little weird being up so high, but there was a comforting lip around the front edge of the roof that kept me from dropping in on the fans below. I watched a couple minutes of the game from this spot, and then looked around the roof a little. It was wide, with HVAC stuff running down the middle and several banks of speakers along the front edge. Here was the view to my right:

And here’s how things looked over to my left:

That’s the press level immediately under the Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton sign. I was hoping to catch the attention of the broadcasters so that I could wave at them, but they were understandably focused on the game.

Two people who did notice my location were my brother and nephew. They’d been keeping an eye out for me, and when I appeared at the edge of the roof, my nephew was waving like crazy. (Later, he asked me, “How did you get up there?”)

After snapping the scene in panoramic form …

… my mission was to find a foul ball. I’ve been to enough Champions games to know that foul balls land on the roof. A lot. I was surprised that the roof wasn’t littered with baseballs, which indicates that someone from the gameday staff or grounds crew likely visits the roof regularly to collect them. I told my tour guide that I wanted to take a couple minutes to hunt for a baseball, and he obliged. Unfortunately, that tour yielded nothing. As I expressed disappointment, my new friend smiled and handed me a ball that he’d found:

I’ve managed to collect a bunch of baseballs over the years, but it’s hard to beat the cool location of this one!

Our rooftop visit wrapped up soon afterward, and I need to give a big thank you to my rooftop tour guide for making it happen.

Afterward, I rejoined my brother and nephew and we moved to this spot behind home plate …

… where we remained until the final out.

I’m pleased to say that my first all-star game experience was a thrill, and I commend the Champions organization for doing such a great job of putting on the spectacle for baseball fans.

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