Minnesota Twins – September 16, 2017

I’m an early riser at home, and that holds true on my baseball trips, too. The way I see it, there’s very little point in lying in bed when I’m in a new city filled with interesting things to see and do.

All that to say, I was up good and early on my second day in Minneapolis and eager to get things started. I decided to begin my day with a walk around the city’s downtown. One of my favorite things about Minneapolis is that you can get virtually anywhere downtown on foot, all without going outside. Nothing against fresh air of course, but the Minneapolis Skyway System quickly became a hit for me. It’s a network of enclosed pedestrian bridges and walkways that link up the buildings over 80 (!!) city blocks. It’s the biggest system of its kind in the world, and I found it exceedingly handy and exciting to use.

I took one of the bridges that connected to the second floor of my hotel, the Embassy Suites by Hilton Minneapolis Downtown, and from it, I could see my hotel on the right and Target Field in the distance. And that’s the Mayo Clinic on the left:

After walking for about 45 minutes, all without going outside, I made my way back to my hotel and had breakfast. One of the things that I really like about the Embassy Suites brand is that breakfast is included with your stay, and it’s outstanding. Each of the four days of my stay, I had ready-made omelets for breakfast, among other things, to ensure that I’d be properly fueled for my adventure.

Speaking of adventure, after relaxing in my hotel room for a bit, I headed off to Target Field. A day earlier, I’d gone straight into the ballpark instead of doing my usual walk around its exterior, so that was atop my to-do list on this day. Check out this panorama that shows just how gorgeous this ballpark is:

There’s a lot going on in this photo. Starting at the far left, you’ll see a parking structure that is connected to the ballpark with one of the Minneapolis Skyway System’s bridges. Below that is North 7th Street, which runs roughly parallel to the first base line. On this side of the bridge is the team shop; despite the size of it, it’s just one level — but the tall ceilings give it a really roomy feel. Next is Gate 29, followed by one of the ticket offices. And, of course, you’ve also got the famous baseball statue. It’s difficult to tell in the above panorama, but the curved markings on the ground make up an enormous Target logo. (There are actually a handful of them on the ground around Target Field.)

Next, I walked around to the corner of North 5th Street and North 3rd Avenue, which is where you’ll find Gate 3:

This is a popular gate for the fans who arrive via light rail, and there are a lot of them. Up the hill on the right side of the above image is Target Field Station, one of the stops on Minneapolis’ light rail system. If you’ve read my post about the first day of my visit, you’ll recall that I was thoroughly impressed with how easy it was to get around the city via light rail, and that I’d taken it from the airport terminal to within a block of my hotel. Target Field Station is where the Metro Blue Line ends, and I think it’s outstanding that you can so easily get to the ballpark in this manner.

Because I’m apparently on a roll with panoramas, here’s another one. It’s similar to the first one that you saw, but taken from farther back:

I like how it turned out, and I also like that the dark clouds soon went away and didn’t interfere with the ballgame!

My last stop before entering the park was Twins Plaza outside Gate 34, which I’d enjoyed checking out a day earlier. In addition to the Kirby Puckett statue, which I grabbed a photo with, you’ll likely recognize the statue called The Golden Glove. It was added in 2010 and recognizes the Twins’ Gold Glove winners. Lots of great names are honored on a plaque next to the glove — Puckett, Jim Kaat, Gary Gaetti, Tony Oliva, Torii Hunter and Joe Mauer, among others.

Even more enticing than the plaque is the glove itself, which is cupped to make it one of the coolest seats in all of baseball. Before games, there’s a lineup of fans waiting to sit on it and have their pictures taken, but I was early enough that no one was around — and that meant I had the glove to myself:

Want one more panorama before we head into the ballpark? Yes? I’m glad to hear it.

Here’s a look at Twins Plaza with Gate 34 in the background — and you can see the glove roughly in the middle of the picture:

Apparently, I was panorama-happy on my second day in Minneapolis, because after getting into Target Field and walking to the concourse behind home plate, I snapped this shot:

The Twins have one darned impressive-looking ballpark, don’t they?

As you can see, batting practice hadn’t yet begun, so I went straight down to field level on the third base side. A day earlier, I’d watched the Blue Jays playing catch, and now I was interested in seeing the Twins. As I made my way down the front row of seats toward the outfield, I saw a baseball that someone have evidently airmailed into the stands, and decided to take an artsy shot of it. I call this one “Baseball on Concrete With Sunflower Seed Shell in Background.”

I didn’t have any noteworthy interactions with the Twins, but I did get to stand behind one of my all-time favorite players, Joe Mauer, and watch him play catch for several minutes …

… before moving toward the infield to watch him field ground balls at first base:

I also had a close-up encounter with ageless wonder Bartolo Colón, who holds distinction for many things, including being the last remaining player from the Montréal Expos to be playing in the big leagues:

After watching the Twins for a while longer, I went over to the visitors dugout for the first time since a day earlier, where I watched a bunch of the Jays get loose.

I also noticed Hazel Mae, the on-field reporter for Toronto’s TV broadcasts on Sportsnet, signing some autographs for fans — including this very happy young man:

I’ve included this mention of Mae because it wasn’t long before she was making Twitter headlines. Later in the game, she was hit in the ankle with a Kevin Pillar foul ball and had to go get some first aid. (A day later, she was back on the field with a crutch.)

During my first game at Target Field’s I’d gazed way up to the Budweiser Roof Deck in the left field corner and pledged that I’d check it out at some point. Now seemed as good a time as any, so I headed toward the left field corner, rode an elevator all the way to the roof deck, and soon had this bird’s eye view of the stadium:

The roof deck, like many of its kind, is reserved for group/private functions. The one booked for this game hadn’t yet begun, but there were several stadium staffers busily getting the area prepared. In addition to multiple levels of stadium seating, the rood deck also had couches, bistro tables and an enormous bar, some of which you can see here:

Upon departing the roof deck, I went back down to the main concourse and made my way over to the first base side, where I snapped the following photo that I want to use to illustrate some of Target Field’s seating situation:

One of the things that really struck me about this ballpark was just how many different spots there were for fans to hang out and watch the game. The above image is looking in just a single direction, of course, but check out how many places there are for fans. The main spot in this image is the upper deck in right-center, and I love how it’s asymmetrical in design. I spent some time in this area during each game I attended, and really enjoyed the view. You’ve got a smaller, more intimate seating section directly below that deck, as well as standing room behind it. Moving toward center field, there’s the ultra-popular Minnie and Paul’s, a pub-style area that you can see directly below the Target Field sign. It’s got tables and chairs and standing-room spots, and is open to all fans. Directly below it is a premium seating area called Catch, which is limited to just 120 seats and includes high-end food with your ticket. And these are just the spots in a single photograph. It seemed as though whatever direction I looked, there were many different spots for fans.

My next stop was the top row of the upper deck on the third base side, where I was anxious to not only see the ballpark from this vantage point, but to also turn my back to the field and check out Target Field Station. As I mentioned in my last post, I took Minneapolis’ light rail around the city extensively during my visit, and while I walked to Target Field instead of traveled to it via light rail, I remain thoroughly impressed with the ease of getting around — and getting to the ballpark — in this city. Here’s a look at Target Field Station from inside the ballpark, and I think you’ll agree that it looks sharp:

In the above image, the video board was showing an advertisement, but was otherwise airing the Twins pregame show, which I thought was a cool touch for fans to see as they got off the train and proceeded toward the gates.

Because I was already in the upper deck, I decided to walk all the way around to behind home plate, where I paused to take in this spectacular view:

All the sightseeing — or was it simply the fact that I’d been keeping my eye on the various concession stand menus as I toured around — had worked up my appetite, so I soon decided that something to eat would be a good idea. Although there were many things that intrigued me, I quickly made my mind up about what I’d be eating. I present to you the shrimp boil:

Shrimp boils aren’t exactly popular where I live in Canada, but I’ve seen them enough online that I’ve always wanted to try one. So, when I scouted out this item on the Target Field menu, I knew that I had to eat it at some point during my visit. At $14.50, this meal wasn’t cheap, but it also wasn’t small. It contained a hefty serving of shrimp, spicy sausage, corn on the cob segments and red potatoes, all tossed with creole seasoning. The verdict, I’m pleased to say, was freakin’ awesome. The variety of tastes and textures, all coated with the spicy seasoning, made this dish a real winner, and one that I had to fight the urge not to order a day later. In fact, it left such an impression on me that when I helped to put together the list for USA Today’s Best Stadium Food competition a couple months ago, I included it as one of the choices.

After eating, I went to check out the Delta Sky360 Club, which is situated at the concourse level behind home plate. It’s got a ton of concession stands, bar-style seating and, most importantly, allows you to walk through the history of the Twins by showcasing dozens of interesting artifacts. This is how the area looks in panoramic form:

See the display cases? Here are some closeups:

I spent a considerable amount of time browsing the hall of fame-worthy collection, which paid tribute to not only the top players and best moments from throughout the history of the franchise, but also to other key moments in Target Field’s history, including the various big concerts that the stadium has hosted over the years.

I ended up watching a couple innings of the action from the seats inside the Delta Sky360 Club, taking advantage of each break between innings to walk over to the artifact displays and browse them for a couple minutes. As the game progressed and night fell, I went back out to the concourse, took a lap of the stadium, and then went outside to snap some shots of it from the exterior. Here’s one in particular that I like:

Soon enough, I was back inside the stadium and looking for a spot to sit for the remainder of the game. I found it in the top row of the upper deck in right center, where I had this view:

Just like a day earlier, I headed out of Target Field immediately after the final out and was back in my hotel room just a few minutes later, eagerly anticipating the Twins day game that I’d be attending about 12 hours later.

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