Milwaukee Brewers – September 15, 2018

There’s always something fun about waking up on the morning of a travel day, imagining the adventure that will take place over the next several hours.

There’s also something fun about waking up in a city for the first time and knowing that travel isn’t going to be a part of the day’s activities. It’s that type of balance that keeps my baseball trips always exciting, and this latter type of day was what I faced on Saturday, September 15.

Having arrived in Milwaukee a day earlier and with already one Miller Park visit under my belt, I was excited to get back to the ballpark that I could see from my hotel room — but, in the meantime, I was pumped to spend the day finding fun things to see and do. The Milwaukee area has a wealth of activities to consider but, to be honest, I was looking to spend the day in a very low-key way.

That worked perfectly, thanks for the hotel at which I was staying. Being at the Potawatomi Hotel & Casino not only meant that I was just a short distance from Miller Park, but it also gave me plenty to see without ever leaving the property. After working on my blog a bit and having breakfast in my room — keeping an eye on Miller Park, of course — I decided to tour through the hotel and check out some of the areas that I hadn’t seen a day earlier. I spent a fair bit of time walking around the gaming floor, and while I’m not a gambling enthusiast, it was fun to see what a spectacle everything was. I also spent some time evaluating my options for lunch. The property has nine different restaurants, and while the buffet was definitely tempting, I also wanted to leave room for some ballpark food later that day. I ended up ordering a meal from The Pit, a sports bar on the premises, and taking it back to my room to eat. On this day, lunch was a meal called the Pit Burger — a burger that was topped with prime rib, bacon, steak sauce and provolone.

I spent the afternoon sticking pretty close to the hotel, other than a quick trip to a nearby Target to buy some provisions that I’d forgotten to buy a day earlier. I don’t have a picture, but you could clearly see Miller Park in the distance from the Target parking lot, which made for a cool backdrop that definitely added excitement to an otherwise mundane shopping outing.

Just before 4 p.m., I made the short drive over to Miller Park and set out to explore the tailgating scene. I’d seen a fair number of tailgaters a day earlier, but now that Saturday had arrived, they were out in full force. The scene was unlike anything I’d ever encountered at a ballpark. If you didn’t see Miller Park in the background, you’d easily mistake this for a college or professional football tailgating environment. There were scenes like this …

… and like this …

… everywhere I turned. I spent a fair bit of time walking through the various parking lots around Miller Park, enjoying the sights, but also the sounds and smells — namely, country music or sports talk radio blasting from car speakers and the ever-present smell of charcoal and grilled meats wafting through the air. Before I continued on my way to Miller Park, I noticed a sign for the Hank Aaron State Trail, which I knew was something that I definitely needed to check out. It’s a 14-mile trail that runs from the shore of Lake Michigan and west across the city of Milwaukee to the edge of the adjacent Waukesha County — including going right past Miller Park. I got on the trail here …

… and while I didn’t walk on it for long, I was happy to get the chance to check it out.

After my brief trail walk, I continued on to Miller Park:

If the sun looks bright to you in the photo above, I can assure you that it was. It was a perfect fall day with a mixture of warm sun and mild breezes that made me glad to be taking in a baseball game. I took a short look at Halfaer Field, which is a Little League field just a minute’s walk from Miller Park. I had this view of the kick ball tournament that was taking place:

How close is Halfaer Field to Miller Park? When I turned to face away from the Little League facility, this was my view:

Even with all of the time that I’d already spent in the area, I still had to wait a while longer for the gates to open. Rather than stand in line, I took a slow walk around the exterior of the park to check it out from different angles, like this one:

It’s funny, the above photo makes it look as though I was one of only a handful of fans in the area, but the reality is that there were probably a few thousand people tailgating just a few minutes’ walk away.

As I made my way around the ballpark, I also checked out the players’ parking lot:

There are obviously some staff members’ cars parked here — I don’t think anyone on the Brewers roster is driving a Camry — but there were definitely some sweet rides to check out. I love scouting out the players’ parking lot at different MLB stadiums whenever I have the chance. Cleveland always comes to mind as providing one of the most visible parking lots, as you can see it from both the concourse and from the sidewalk, but this one was pretty visible, too.

In my previous blog post, I talked about being in the outfield and enjoying the design of Miller Park. Specifically, I mentioned the windows on the ground floor and the openings above, which allow fresh air to flow into the park from outside. Here’s how that area looks from the plaza directly outside of the park:

See the various sets of railings below the Miller Lite Deck sign? I stood in several of those locations a day earlier.

I should also note that if you’re interested in snagging a baseball during your visit to Miller Park, it’s possible to get one by standing roughly in the spot from which I snapped the above photo. You have to be well over 500 feet from home plate in this area, but I definitely saw a couple of balls bounce off the outfield concourse and leave the stadium through these openings when I was inside of the stadium for BP a day earlier.

As for the windows along the ground floor, I approached one, peeked through and was surprised that I could see all the way to home plate. I could clearly see that the Pittsburgh Pirates were currently taking batting practice:

I instantly got obsessed with the idea of somehow snagging a baseball outside of the stadium, and stood well back from this wall and stared intently at it. I’m sure those passing by wondered what I was up to, but I figured that I’d answer their doubt by deftly running to catch a home run baseball.

Unfortunately, that didn’t happen, and after standing in that spot for about 10 minutes, I decided to continue on my way.

I walked a short distance and looked up so that I could see Bernie’s Slide, which is located in left field and is one of the more memorable/quirky ballpark features across the big leagues:

As I stood there and looked up at the stadium, I was continually impressed with the transparency of everything. In my travels, I’ve encountered a ton of MiLB parks, even at the game’s lower levels, that go to considerable effort to prevent fans from seeing inside the park. The fact that the Brewers are encouraging people to see inside is a real treat, and an example that more teams should follow.

Soon enough, it was time not just to peek into the park, but to actually go in. I lined up right after I took the above photo, and was soon inside of Miller Park to begin my second visit. This was a giveaway day, and while I normally try to schedule my trips to avoid big promotions because big promotions mean big crowds that can sometimes limit my ability to explore the stadium so much, that was unavoidable on this trip. The giveaway was a throwback Brewers hat, which actually sounded sort of cool when I’d heard about it. The hat, however, left a little to be desired:

I couldn’t have ever imagined myself wearing this hat, so I left it on a table with the hopes that someone might pick it up and enjoy it.

To start this visit, I had a clear mission as soon as I got in — I quickly made it to a ramp, did a sort of half-walk, half-run all the way to the upper deck, and emerged into the seating bowl at this spot:

For those keeping score, that’s Bernie’s Slide behind the foul pole, and it was fun to see it from two uniquely different vantage points, just a few minutes apart. But I wasn’t in the upper deck to check out the slide. I had my sights focused on the Bob Uecker statue that sits in the top row of Miller Park, way up behind home plate. Being so close to the foul pole meant that I obviously had quite a trek to get to this popular Miller Park attraction, so I hustled through the seats in the direction of the statue. I could see that it was covered in a tarp, but a little over halfway through my journey, a stadium staffer emerged, climbed up to the statue and pulled the tarp off Bob. A moment later, I got there and was the first fan in the area. I snapped this shot of the statue:

And then took the seat next to Bob for a few minutes. It was no surprise to soon see some fans coming my way, and I asked the first one who arrived to snap this photo of me …

… before I took a similar photo of him, and then continued on my way.

By the way, if you have plans of grabbing the seat next to the statue and perhaps enjoying a bit of the game, here’s the view from that spot:

Because I was already in the upper deck, I took advantage of this spot to enjoy the view of Miller Park:

The sun wasn’t as bright as it had been a day earlier, which meant that it wasn’t as glaring in the outfield. That gave me a better chance to enjoy the view not only of the ballpark, but also of the space outside of it.

While I was in the upper deck, I gazed around me to check out any sights that I’d perhaps missed a day earlier. One thing that caught my eye at this point was the visual appeal of the glass and metal design in the upper deck, which you can see here:

As I’ve repeatedly stated, I’m not generally a fan of stadiums with roofs, but it’s hard to knock one that looks this sharp.

BP had wrapped up early, so with nothing to see on the field, I decided to spend a little longer in the upper deck. Since I’d entered it roughly at the left field foul pole, I thought it’d only be fitting to go all the way to the right field foul pole, so that’s where I headed next. From here, I had a good view of the video board, the Toyota deck to the right field side of it and the openings to the stadium’s exterior:

I moved a little farther through the seats until I was essentially in line with the first base line, and snapped this panorama to show the view from where I stood:

Just then, I noticed that the video board was showing a selection of fan photos from the previous day. I began to wonder if one of the shots that I’d tweeted out might appear. Then, seemingly right on cue, my big head appeared on the video board. I was able to quickly snap this shot, despite not being at an optimal angle:

If you look sharply, you can see me in the lower right. Some of you might recall that this isn’t the first time one of my pics made it to an MLB video board — I had a similar situation occur a couple of years prior at Coors Field.

Next, I decided to head back down to the main level, where I took a full lap around the concourse until the players came out to the field, and then went down to watch them warm up. When first pitch approached, I found a spot in the outfield, and that’s where I remained for the first inning with this view:

Just for fun, I’ve added an arrow to show the position of the Bob Uecker statue relative to the field and roof.

After the first inning, I started to browse some of the concession stands to find dinner for my second visit to Miller Park. Again, I was hoping to find something that suited the city or the state, and pierogies caught my eye. There are a lot of areas across Wisconsin with significant Polish populations; Wikipedia tells me that nearly 10 percent of the population of Milwaukee itself is of Polish descent. All this means that there was a pierogi concession stand, and it definitely caught my eye. Pierogies are one of my all-time favorite foods, and while I’ve had them at a number of ballparks, I’ve yet to encounter a truly memorable meal. Fortunately, that was about to change. I bought an order of bacon/sauerkraut pierogies, which looked like this:

Granted, the serving seemed a little small, but it was really good. If I had to nitpick, I’d like the bacon to have been a little crispier. Overall, though, the flavor of this dish was excellent and I’m glad that I found another winner.

I knew that I couldn’t resist another visit to the Brewers Authentics kiosk, so that’s where I headed next. I’d eyed up so many different game-used items each time that I’d previously browsed the kiosk, and knew that I had to pull the trigger on something. I’ve got a number of game-used jerseys in my collection, but the wide selection of game-used pants was really catching my eye. In particular, I was eyeing up the special pants that the Brewers wore in 2015 to pay tribute to the Milwaukee Bears, a Negro National League team that operated in 1923. There were several of these pants from a variety of players, but not from anyone who was really notable. I’d been talking to one of the kiosk staffers a day earlier, and he recognized me when I returned again. When I expressed some interest in the pants but lamented that there weren’t any bigger names, he told me to wait for a moment and started pulling some additional pairs out of a storage area. I reviewed the names and was surprised to see Francisco Rodriguez, who was one of the best closers in the game for several seasons. I couldn’t resist getting the game-used pants of a six-time all-star, and for $20, I think it was one heck of a buy. Resisting the urge to don the pants for the rest of the game, I headed to a seat in the outfield and checked them out once I sat down. I’ll have a dedicated post sometime later this off-season about all of the game-used gear that I’ve picked up over the last few seasons. For now, though, here’s the label inside of the waistband:

After carefully folding up the pants and putting them in my backpack, I snapped this shot …

… and watched a bit of the game from this spot. Then, I made my way back up to the upper deck, taking a seat not far from Bernie’s Slide:

I opted to sit in that spot for a few innings, and the short September days meant that before long, the sun was setting and Miller Park was quickly taking on an evening appearance:

It took a while, but Bernie finally made an appearance, holding up a sign that I couldn’t read from my vantage point:

(Full disclosure: I don’t really have any interest in mascots, but I like the unique slide feature at Miller Park and was anxious to see it in use.)

Alas, I did not see Bernie take a carefree slide down it, and after spending a few innings in that spot, I found a seat in right field and stayed there until the game was over.

With two games under my belt, I was glad that it wasn’t time to fly home just yet. On my next visit to Miller Park, I’d finally get a chance to meet someone with whom I’ve been Twitter friends for about eight years.

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