Richmond Flying Squirrels – June 29, 2019

The majority of my nine-day road trip took place in North Carolina, but there was one notable exception — a June 29 sojourn into Virginia so that I could see the Richmond Flying Squirrels play.

About nine hours after getting back to my hotel after seeing the Carolina Mudcats in action, I was back in my rental car and headed north about 170 miles. This would be the first time I’d be in Virginia since seeing the Norfolk Tides just over a year ago. The drive to Richmond should’ve been easy, but it took way longer than I’d have liked, thanks to a few major traffic jams on I-95. Between the traffic and a couple of sightseeing detours, I arrived in Virginia’s capital city much later than expected, and after checking into a hotel out the outskirts of town, I had to race downtown to get to The Diamond.

The June 29 game against the Hartford Yard Goats was a 6 p.m. start, which is common on Saturdays. I had it in my head that the game was a 7 p.m. start, so when I arrived about 4:30 p.m. — early, but not nearly as early as usual — there was a huge crowd and the gates were just 30 minutes from opening. This was the first time that I’d ever botched a game time, and while it wasn’t a huge deal, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little rattled as I climbed out of my car upon realizing what had happened.

I always love getting into the ballpark before the gates open, but I also love a walk around the outside before I go in. There simply wasn’t enough time to devote to a comprehensive perimeter walk, so after I took this shot from the parking lot …

… I headed through the main gates into the park:

You might’ve noticed in my first photo that The Diamond has a unique look from the exterior. Some might call it dated, but let’s stick with unique. This ballpark opened in 1985, making it the second oldest in the Eastern League. Only Reading’s historic FirstEnergy Stadium, which opened in 1951, is older. This means that by today’s high standards of minor league ballparks, The Diamond has a few less-than-desirable architectural features, but the team has done an exemplary job of making this a high energy and fun place to watch a baseball game.

The Diamond is the 74th different stadium at which I’ve seen a game, but it’s more noteworthy to me because visiting it now means that I’ve seen at least one game in every Eastern League ballpark. I first visited an EL facility back in 2010, but it took me until this summer to hit the 12th and final Eastern League park. Interestingly, this marks the first league that I’ve “completed,” for lack of a better term. (I’m also just a few parks away from completing a handful of other minor leagues.)

Resisting the urge to take a lap around the concourse right away, I cut through the park and went down toward the seating bowl to get a look at the view from home plate, which looked like this:

If you’re wondering what looks a little different about this shot, it’s the black frame around the netting behind the plate. While every MiLB park obviously has netting in this area, I can’t recall another that has the distinctive framing around it. It definitely looks obstructive in this photo, and I wondered how it might seem during game action. I’m happy to report that when you’re in any seat behind home plate and are focused on the game, the frame tends to disappear just like the netting that it supports.

My semi-late arrival meant that I’d missed batting practice — or, more likely, BP had been cancelled because it was 95 degrees — so after standing behind home plate for just a moment, I decided to start exploring the seating bowl. Eighties-era ballparks are known for their vast seating bowls, and because there aren’t that many examples like this left in the minor leagues, I was excited to make my way up toward the top. I started by heading down the third base side, climbing up the steps and turning to take this panorama:

The shade blocks things out a little, but there are some interesting things to point out. If you look at the upper deck seats on the first base side, you’ll notice that the top handful of rows — I’d say about six of them — have been tarped off. I like how the team has closed only the top few rows of each section rather than closed sections entirely. I’ve been to a handful of games in which the team closes specific upper deck sections, and I hate the idea of not being able to explore whatever sections I want. Over the course of the evening, I spent time in many of the upper deck sections at The Diamond, and didn’t feel that I was missing out by not having a chance to sit in the top few rows.

After snapping the panorama above, I took this shot to share on social media:

You’ll see by the handful of fans in the stands that the gates had now opened, so after taking this photo of the Richmond skyline beyond the outfield fence …

… and this shot that shows the press box and the space around it …

… I decided to go back down to the concourse to explore it before things got crowded.

I mentioned earlier that The Diamond has some unusual architectural features, but that the team does a good job of overcoming them. Here’s an example:

This is a walkway that wraps around the exterior of the stadium above the main concourse. It feels pretty isolated in this spot, and and it doesn’t seem like an area that you’d be in a hurry to check out, right? That may be true, but look how many displays there are on both sides of the walkway. The displays pay tribute to past Flying Squirrels teams and alumni who’ve reached the major leagues, which instantly boosts the appeal of being in this part of the stadium.

As I made a lap of the concourse, I noticed several things of note. It’d been a while since I’d visited a ballpark of this era. (I visited PNC Field in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre in 2011, and although it opened a few years after The Diamond, there were lots of similarities. PNC Field was closed for 2012 as it went through a $43 million renovation that turned it into one of the gems of Triple-A baseball, for the record.) That meant that even though some of the features are outdated by today’s ballpark standards, they were still interesting to see.

Here’s one thing that you don’t see very often anymore — narrow walkways leading from the concourse to the seating bowl:

Remember when arcade games were a thing at ballparks? There was a large collection of arcades at one end of the concourse at The Diamond:

I didn’t see anyone playing them in all the time I spent walking around, which makes me wonder — with the easy access to mobile games today, does anyone play arcade games anymore? This spot arguably seemed like the most dated section of the ballpark, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see it changed the next time that Richmond’s ownership plans a renovation.

The position of the suites made for another interesting design feature at this stadium. Because they’re located on the concourse level, and are positioned between the concourse and the seating bowl, they stick out into the concourse. The team has done a really good job of having local artists paint the back sides of the suites in different ways. Here’s an eye-catching “Greetings from the River City” motif:

As I made my way around the concourse, I noted how the crowd was quickly growing. It seemed very apparent that Richmond strongly supports its Flying Squirrels. That made for a fun atmosphere as I continued to walk around and note some of The Diamond’s unique design features, like this one — the upper deck seats that loom large over the concourse, and are supported on the outer edge with enormous concrete posts:

Eventually, I returned to the seating bowl to explore it a little more. First, I made my way to the upper seats behind home plate, where I shot this panorama:

Then, I made a long walk from the left field end of the seating bowl all the way to the right field end, pausing to take this shot of the upper rows of seats and the tarp mounted behind them:

When I got to the right field side, I was able to look down and see the area known as the Bullpen Deck, which was added in 2016:

It caught my eye for a number of reasons. First, it’s open to any fan who wants to visit it. So many decks and picnic areas are reserved for groups, which definitely makes sense from a business perspective, but I’m always excited when I see a deck that any fan can check out. Additionally, the Bullpen Deck isn’t just one deck. Rather, it consists of two deck areas, both with plenty of standing room and seating areas, that are joined with a walkway.

I definitely wanted to check out the Bullpen Deck, especially before it got crowded once the game began. On my way down from the upper deck, I snapped this panorama …

… and then made my way down to the deck to check out the view. There were a number of neat places to stand, but most of them were occupied by the time I arrived. This was the lone spot that I could find without people:

This is definitely a place to check out when you visit The Diamond, but you’ll want to get there promptly to claim your spot.

The teams had taken the field by now, and although my current position gave me a really good view of the Flying Squirrels warming up, the players were in some fairly serious shadows that I knew wouldn’t translate well to photos. I decided to follow the cross-aisle all the way around to the left field side to watch the Hartford squad getting read. Plus, the Yard Goats were wearing their alternate green jerseys, which I’d yet to see in person and was excited to check out.

Here’s a look at Hartford infielder Alan Trejo:

And his teammate, outfielder Manny Melendez:

After they finished playing catch, this trio of Yard Goats celebrated by tapping their gloves together:

Once warm-ups concluded, I went back to the concourse to take another look around. My next stop was the team shop, which is easily one of the largest that I’ve seen at any level of the minor leagues. It was really impressive, especially given the era of this stadium.

When the game began, I found a spot in the shade, and didn’t do as much walking around as I normally do. I’d been able to check out virtually all of the sights and spots before first pitch, and now it was time to relax a bit. It’s not often that I just sit and watch a ballgame, but after several extremely hot days and an average of more than 16,000 steps taken per day, the truth is that I needed a bit of a break. It was a pleasant change to simply chill out during the game — and a good way to recharge my batteries for the rest of the trip.

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