Fayetteville Woodpeckers – July 1, 2019

I always admire my fellow baseball road trippers who make plans to visit new MLB or MiLB parks in their inaugural seasons. This is an idea that has often caught my eye, but for various reasons, I’d never been able to make it work prior to this season. I’ve been traveling since 2010 for The Ballpark Guide, but never fared better than visiting a second-year park. (In fact, as far as I can recall, the last time that I visited a ballpark during its first season was Toronto’s SkyDome, waaaay back in 1989. Yikes!)

Fortunately, that would all change this summer.

When I was setting my June and July travel plans for North Carolina, I knew that a visit to Segra Stadium, home of the first-year Fayetteville Woodpeckers, had to be on the agenda. And so, after a day with the Richmond Flying Squirrels and a much-needed off day, I was back on the road and headed to another city.

I got to Fayetteville early in the afternoon, and after a quick bite of lunch in the car, drove straight to the campus of Methodist University. If you’ve been reading my posts about my trip through North Carolina, you might recall that I’d made a point of visiting a number of NCAA baseball facilities whenever possible, and I’d added Methodist’s Armstrong-Shelley Field to my must-see list. The Methodist Monarchs are notable for making the Div. III College World Series on six occasions, and finishing as the tournament’s runner-up in 1995. Upon pulling onto the campus, I was immediately struck by its beauty and tranquil nature; in a visit that maybe lasted 15 minutes, I saw only two people. After a couple of minutes of driving, I’d made my way to an empty parking lot outside of the baseball facility. I wasn’t able to get inside of the facility, unfortunately, but after snapping this shot of the main gate …

… I climbed up on top of the third base seats and shot this panorama:

Armstrong-Shelley Field is the 15th different NCAA baseball facility that I’ve visited — none to actually see a game, unfortunately — and the sixth different NCAA stop on my June/July road trip. Yes, I even track the ballparks that I visit when it’s only to take a few photos, not to see a game.

After a short walk around the field, it was time to head to my hotel to enjoy some air conditioning for a bit. Why? Well, North Carolina was in the middle of a heatwave that saw the temperatures on this day hit 99 degrees.

During my visit to Fayetteville, I was staying at the Fairfield Inn & Suites Fayetteville North. It was just a couple of minutes from the campus of MU and, most importantly, only 12 minutes from Segra Stadium. It’s the number one hotel in Fayetteville on TripAdvisor, and with good reason — although it opened in 2014, you’d have had a hard time convincing me that the hotel wasn’t a month or two old. Large rooms with comfortable beds, an impressive fitness center, an indoor saltwater pool and a really good free breakfast were all big pluses in my book — and would likely be for any other baseball road tripper, too.

If you’ve followed my blog for a while, you know that my favorite hotels are those that are within sight of the ballpark. My second favorite type of hotels are those that host the visiting team, and I quickly realized that was the case when I got to my room, looked out the window and saw the coach bus of the visiting Salem Red Sox in the parking lot:

Its presence made me irrationally giddy, and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t peek out my window every 10 or so minutes to look at the bus until it departed.

Once it left, I soon followed suit, and got to enjoy the sights of Fayetteville on the short drive to the ballpark.

I parked a short distance from the ballpark and, upon leaving my car, this was the first view that I had:

Segra Stadium is situated just behind the trees on the right. If you look carefully, you’ll see the stadium lighting rising above the treeline.

A couple of minutes later, I had my first view of this Carolina League ballpark:

As you’ll notice, the area surrounding the park was still under construction at the time of my visit. In fact, it wasn’t possible to do my usual full lap of the park because of all the construction. Construction or no construction, I was thrilled to finally be at ballpark #75 — and very eager to start exploring this first-year facility. Before I entered, though, I wanted to do as much checking out of the exterior sights as I could. That included walking over toward the main gates and team shop:

If you noticed the “Victory Means a Little More Here” design on the wall, it’s making reference to the city’s deep connection with the armed forces. Fayetteville is home to Fort Bragg, which is the largest military base in the world. This slogan was one of many military references throughout the park, making it evident that the park’s designers put a lot of thought into tying the design of the ballpark to the community in which it’s located.

Unless you noticed the under-construction building at the left of the image above, you might be asking, “Where’s all this construction that you speak of?” Here’s one image that shows Segra Stadium from another angle:

And here’s a look at the front gates of the park from a distance:

For the record, I’m not remotely pointing out the construction in a pejorative way. On the contrary, seeing this work being done only served to excite me about what the future holds for this new ballpark and for the fans who will be visiting it. It’s clear that there’s a lot of development being done around the park, and I love parks that give fans a selection of things to see, do and eat before the game. It’s clear that’ll be the case for Segra Stadium, even if all of the work wasn’t quite done during my visit.

I figured that I’d done enough pre-entry wandering for now — besides, the temperature was still hovering just below triple digits, so I felt a strong pull to find some shade. I entered through the gate to the left of the team shop and immediately took a few minutes to stand in the shade and just enjoy some reprieve from the sun. It wasn’t long before I was on the move — fortunately, to another shaded area — as I headed right down to field level behind home plate to snap this panorama:

There are a handful of noteworthy things to point out in this photo. I love how the front-row seats are truly at field level. This is something that seems to be occurring at more and more new ballparks, and it really gives fans in these sections the feeling of being right in the middle of the action. There’s also a wrap-around concourse, which is a must in my books, and a combination of seating options throughout the outfield. I also like the small seating sections down the lines. Lots of newer MiLB parks are taking this approach to give fans a cozy feel, rather than having vast sections that may be half empty on any given night. I share these points because I was immediately impressed with the look of Segra Stadium, and excited to continue exploring.

I watched batting practice from the above spot for a few minutes, and then decided to go back up to the main concourse and walk down the first base line. Here’s the first shot that I took once I headed in this direction:

You’ll notice a number of cool design features in this image, too — standing-room railings behind the upper rows of seats, a wide concourse, a big picnic deck in the corner and a large open space at the end of the concourse. I love these large open areas for a few reasons. As someone who spends a lot of time walking at ballparks, I always appreciate these spaces because they’re easy to get through. When things get tight at the end of a concourse, there tends to be a logjam of people that can make these areas congested. Wide-open spaces such as those at Segra Stadium are always easy to navigate. Of course, the other benefit of these spaces is that they can be optimal for snagging long foul balls. Spend a few innings standing with your glove in any such location, and the odds are good that you’ll be rewarded for your efforts.

So, just how expansive is the space down the first base line at Segra Stadium? Here’s a shot that should answer that question:

This wide-open space wasn’t the only exciting feature in this part of the ballpark. This area is also home to the team’s batting cages, which was visible from the concourse:

Traditionally, teams have often had their cages below the ballpark, which might provide convenient access from the clubhouse, but isn’t the most fan-friendly location. Having the cages in a spot where fans can stand and watch is another big plus in my books.

Next, I made a quick climb up to the Landing Area party deck in the right field corner that was quiet now, but would be lively from the time the gates opened through the end of the game. It offered a variety of seating options, including couches, as well as plenty of ways to keep entertained between innings — table tennis, jumbo Jenga and cornhole were all available in this area:

 

Fortunately for fans, this deck wasn’t the only unique seating option in the area. Here are some other places to hang out for the game:

This impressive selection of seats is located just a few steps away from the large Healy’s Bar structure:

I watched BP for a few minutes from the shade of the bar’s overhang, and then continued my lap around Segra Stadium by walking behind the batter’s eye …

… and around to left-center field, where I took a spot along the railing above the grass berm:

From this spot, I kept an eye on BP while focusing the majority of my attention on the Red Sox bullpen session taking place in front of me. I could watch countless hours of bullpen sessions without ever getting bored. Not only is it impressive to watch a professional pitcher throw from just a few feet away, but it’s fascinating to hear snippets of conversation between the players and pitching coach.

As you might’ve noticed from the panorama above, I was standing in the full sun, and even though it wasn’t the midday sun, it was still enough to have sweat dripping off my face. I was thoroughly enjoying the scene, but soon decided to keep walking. Next, I took a moment to check out the kids’ play area beyond the left field concourse. With a rubber floor, a pair of bounce castles and number of other attractions, including these play structures …

… this was definitely one of the better play areas that I’ve seen in the minor leagues.

Resisting the urge to take a trip down the play structure slide, I continued along the concourse and stopped to note this group of seats along the edge of the concourse:

This type of seating layout is increasing popular in the minor leagues, but it was the seats themselves that caught my eye. You’ll notice that instead of being plastic, they have fabric/mesh backs and seats. This feature not only makes them more comfortable to sit for long stretches, but also helps fans to avoid the heat that plastic seats can hold on a sunny day. Another smart idea from the folks who designed this ballpark.

As I made my way back toward home plate, I stopped to snap this shot of myself:

The shirt that I’m wearing is one of my raglans, which you might think of being an odd choice on a 100-degree day. I can’t argue much with that sentiment, but I will tell you that the three-quarter sleeves can help to avoid sunburn, which is why I was wearing it on this sweltering day. Plus, its colors were a perfect match to the Woodpeckers uniforms. Want your own road trip shirt? You can shop for one here.

I grabbed a seat in the shade behind home plate and watched batting practice from that spot, keeping an eye on a TV nearby that was showing the MLB Network feed. The death of Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs had been reported just a short while earlier, so that heartbreaking story was understandably dominating the day’s baseball news. As I watched the Salem squad hit in front of me, I wondered which players might have crossed paths with Skaggs at some point in their careers, or perhaps even been teammates of the deceased young lefty.

After a few minutes of sitting and watching the scene in front of me, I decided to head up to Segra Stadium’s second level and see how things looked from up there. The ballpark’s second level consists of suites, a club area and a party deck — and no matter where you sit, you’ve got a really good view of the field and the ballpark as a whole:

I hung out in the party deck until shortly before the gates opened, and then went down to the main level to take another walk around the field. My next stop was center field, where I looked back toward home plate at this view:

Perhaps it’s the construction crane or the partially finished building that looms above the suite level, but the ballpark has a bit of an incomplete appearance from this vantage point. It’s not a criticism, but I think this area could benefit from a splash of color — maybe a Segra Stadium sign or some team branding. Or maybe even some advertising. Perhaps these things will come in the future and, if so, I think they’ll boost the look of this part of the ballpark.

Near where I stood when I took the photo above is the ballpark’s Rocking Porch, which is definitely one of the best seating sections I’ve come across in the minor leagues. It consists of three levels of rocking chairs, giving fans a fun and unique way to enjoy the game:

Of course, I couldn’t help rocking on one of the chairs for a few minutes, just as I’d done several years earlier in the rocking chair section at Round Rock’s Dell Diamond.

Then, I was on the move again, stopping briefly to snap this photo of the berm and the bullpens in left field …

… and then heading down to field level to watch the players get warmed up. I focused my attention on right field, where the Woodpeckers starting battery of pitcher Chad Donato and catcher Scott Manea were playing catch. Here’s a shot of Donato …

… and one of Manea:

Next, it was time to begin my search for dinner. There were a number of good options that caught my eye — grilled chicken wings from Healy’s, a cheesesteak from Sherwood’s Steaks or any number of enticing hot dogs from Sgt. Stubby’s. In the end, though, I opted for the Rise & Shine Burger from the Bagwell’s Burgers concession stand. It wasn’t just any old burger — it was topped with bacon, ham, smoked gouda, a fried egg, garlic-herb mayo, lettuce and tomato, and definitely goes down as one of the most creative burgers I’ve had at a ballpark:

It wasn’t just creative, though — it was outstanding, and definitely takes a spot among the best ballpark burgers I’ve eaten in all my travels. (By the way, if you aren’t eating your burgers with fried eggs on them, it’s time to get on that.)

Although I shot the above photo in the left field corner just before first pitch, I took the burger over to the bar-style seating in right-center to eat. One thing I’ve learned from eating big burgers (and especially those with over-easy eggs on them) is that you generally want a semi-private location in which to eat, simply because of the risk of a catastrophic yolk mishap.

Fortunately, I managed to avoid such difficulties, and thoroughly enjoyed scarfing down the burger while I kept an eye on the game:

I watched the action from this sunny spot for about an inning after eating, and then went behind home plate for another inning. The next spot that I wanted to check out was the third base side, which was in the shade by this point. First, though, I wanted to grab one of my favorite ballpark treats — frozen lemonade:

Then, it was time to sit back, relax and enjoy the next several innings with this view:

I watched the last inning from a standing-room spot in center field, and then made the short drive back to my hotel after the game — where I kept a watchful eye for the eventual arrival of the Red Sox, bus.

Of course I did.

Advertisements

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s