Fayetteville Woodpeckers – July 2, 2019

My first day in Fayetteville had a little of everything — which would make it hard to top on Day #2.

Truth be told, I wasn’t really worrying about trying to make my second day better than the first. If it could be just a fraction as enjoyable, I’d be more than happy.

I began my second day in this North Carolina town by getting up early, peeking out my window at the Fairfield Inn & Suites Fayetteville North to ensure that the Salem Red Sox bus was still sitting in the parking lot (spoiler alert — it was) and then working out in the hotel’s gym. After breakfast, I settled down in front of my computer for a few hours to do some blogging, and headed out after lunch for a bite to eat and to check out my first stop of the day.

The Woodpeckers are reason enough to visit Fayetteville, but they’re certainly not the only thing to check out while you’re in town. A big attraction that I wanted to make time to see was the Airborne & Special Forces Museum, which sits in the city’s downtown area. Fayetteville is home to Fort Bragg which, among other things, is home to the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. The museum is free to enter and is a must-see stop for any military history buff. It provides a detailed history of the Airborne and Special Forces from the Second World War right up to the present day. I viewed more artifacts than I can begin to list here, but I want to share one that was especially noteworthy — and one that you might know about.

If you’ve seen the movie Black Hawk Down, you might be aware of the 1993 downing of an American Black Hawk helicopter in Somalia. The museum has on display the rotor of the helicopter in question, Super 61, which wasn’t returned to the U.S. until 2013. It was equally impressive and eerie to see this piece of machinery, given its infamous history:

I spent about 90 minutes at the museum — which is actually within walking distance of Segra Stadium — before making a short drive to a spot in town that partially tells the story of Fayetteville’s deep history with baseball. It was here that a young George Herman Ruth picked up the moniker of “Babe,” long before he became a household name across the country. And, as you’ll see on this plaque, Fayetteville is the town in which Ruth hit his first home run as a professional, way back in March of 1914:

(This news came as a bit of a surprise me, as I’d often heard how Ruth hit his first professional round tripper in Toronto. In fact, there’s a plaque at Hanlan’s Point on the Toronto Islands that claims Ruth had his first pro HR at that location in September of 1914, six months after the Fayetteville home run. Curious, right?)

In any case, this was a special plaque to see, and one that I was glad to visit. It’s situated just over a mile from Segra Stadium, so it’s definitely a spot to check out when you’re in Fayetteville to see the Woodpeckers play.

After I was done taking a few photos of the plaque, I made the short drive over to the ballpark to begin my second visit. I mentioned earlier that I’d had such a good time during my first visit that I wasn’t worried about my subsequent one being better. It quickly became clear, however, that Day #2 would top Day #1 in one regard, anyway — the temperature. Here’s a screenshot that I took just after arriving at Segra Stadium:

Yowsers.

I parked my rental car in the same lot that I’d used a day earlier, and made the short — and hot! — walk to Segra Stadium. My blog entry about my first visit touched on the construction that is taking place around this new Carolina League ballpark, including the tall crane that towered over the area. One thing that I didn’t mention, however, was the large Woodpeckers flag that hung off the crane. A slight breeze on Day #2 meant that I was able to snap this shot of the flag:

After entering the ballpark, I set out down the third base concourse to begin my customary walk around the field. As you can see here, the concourse was very quiet at this hour …

… but as you might notice in this photo, there were some goings-on down on the field:

A handful of players from each team were playing catch, and the grounds crew was well underway in its efforts to get the field ready for action. The careful prep of the field just after 4 p.m. told me that there’d be no batting practice on the agenda for the second straight day.

With no BP to watch, I watched some Salem pitchers play catch for a few minutes, and then set my sights on checking out the kids’ play area beyond the left field grass berm. I mentioned in my previous blog post how this area is really impressive, especially by Class-A Advanced standards. Case in point? Take a look at this outstanding baseball diamond for kids to run around:

The triple-digit heat limited my desire to channel my inner Joe Carter and leap around the bases, so I instead went down to the outfield fence just to the left field side of the Rocking Porch, and enjoyed this view:

I love the funky shape of the outfield grass and warning track, which you can see in the immediate foreground. Symmetrical outfields are so bland, don’t you think?

Even though I was disappointed in the lack of batting practice, it was nice to stand behind the outfield fence before the game and not worry about a ball landing on my head for a change. As such, I watched the scene for several minutes from that vantage point, before continuing over to the right field corner, where I checked out this huge, multilevel picnic deck:

The next place that I visited was the front row on the third base side. By now, most of the players had left the field, so I just hung out for a minutes and enjoyed the quiet space in front of me. From here, I also snapped this photo that shows one of the other things that I like about Segra Stadium’s design — the open appearance of the netting-covered wall, rather than their concrete, foam-covered counterparts that are still the norm at most minor league parks:

This design gives fans the feeling of being closer to the action, in part because they can more easily see players as they approach the wall, as well as track the path of foul balls as they roll past. It’s little details like this that improve the overall ballpark experience, and I commend the Woodpeckers on making this decision.

I spent a little time sitting at field level, and then checked out the grass berm immediately behind the wall between the two bullpens …

… before the heat drove me into the shade of the concourse and, eventually, the air conditioned confines of the team shop. As with many other elements at Segra Stadium, the team shop was impressive. Large and roomy, and with a wide selection of apparel, it definitely didn’t feel like a Class-A Advanced retail space.

Once the gates opened, I went back out to the concourse to take another lap around. As I stood by one of the railings, I looked down and saw my shadow on the field — and couldn’t resist taking the latest version of this shot from Russell Diethrick Park or this shot from Southwest University Park:

Since I hadn’t taken much in the way of action shots a day earlier, and I’d thoroughly explored the ballpark by this point, I decided to head over to the home bullpen to watch starting pitcher Luis Garcia throw:

The grass berm immediately above Segra Stadium’s bullpens gives fans a really good view of the goings-on. I love when ballpark designs provide this up-close-and-personal access, rather than have the bullpens situated where you can’t get too close. From where I stood, I was just a handful of yards from Woodpeckers catcher Michael Papierski, and enjoyed the challenge of trying to snap photos just as the baseball was entering his glove. Here’s a shot that turned out pretty well:

I watched the entirety of their session, and then found a spot behind home plate to watch the first couple of innings …

… and then spent the remainder of the game watching from different vantage points — and grabbed some shade here and there when possible.

I was thoroughly impressed with Segra Stadium, and glad that I finally had a chance to check out an MiLB ballpark in its first year of operation. This is a ballpark that you’ll appreciate for a number of reasons, so I encourage you to give Fayetteville, N.C. some thought when you’re looking at potential destinations for your upcoming baseball road trips.

My two days in Fayetteville were a blast, but my trip wasn’t done yet. I had one more North Carolina city to visit the next day.

2 comments

  1. louis11725

    Nice articles. Well written with some good images to enhance the articles.
    Having been to the Diamond in Richmond Virginia, I can attest to the facts in your article.
    I too, love going to baseball games in other states. I have been to The Richmond Flying Squirrels (around 10 games over the years), Wilmington Blue Rocks (around 20+ games), Durham Bulls (1 game) and Greensboro Grasshoppers (1 game) and Philadelphia Phillies (1 game).
    My local “Fav” team, The Long Island Ducks, are a lot of fun too! I attend about 25 games a year at Bethpage Ballpark, in Central Islip NY. Stop by next season to attend a game or two if you are in the area. I also have seen The Brooklyn Cyclones in Coney Island, NY. That is a park you will definitely want to see, if in the area. It is right next to Luna Park Coney Island. That is one of the oldest amusement parks in the USA.
    Stay well

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