Tagged: Atlanta Braves

Atlanta Braves – August 31, 2018

Day one of my visit to Atlanta was so memorable that there was a part of me that worried about the second day being a letdown.

Fortunately, it wasn’t long before I realized that wouldn’t be the case.

The Braves were hosting the Pittsburgh Pirates in an evening game, and I was excited to head over to the ballpark in the early afternoon, where I planned to take in The Battery for a few hours, and then experience SunTrust Park for a second straight night.

Before I walked to the park, I decided to grab lunch and take it back to my hotel. As I rode in my hotel elevator, another guest got on. He looked at my shirt — which you might be surprised to know wasn’t one of my shirts, but was just a generic Under Armour baseball shirt — and asked, “Are you here for baseball?” I told him that I was, and asked if he was, too. He indeed was, and he soon introduced himself as Wesley Wright, a former major leaguer. I recognized his name, but I don’t think I’d have recognized him, so I’m glad he introduced himself. We talked about some of the different ballparks we had in common — me visiting as a fan, and him playing in — and chatted the rest of the elevator ride, through the hotel lobby and out to the parking lot, where we took this photo:

I did some research on him afterward, and he played eight seasons in the big leagues with the Astros, Rays, Angels, Cubs and Orioles. His best season came in 2012 with the Astros, when he made 77 appearances and struck out 54 batters in 52.1 innings, all while posting a tidy 3.27 ERA. He last played professional baseball in 2017, making 30 appearances for the Triple-A Round Rock Express, and is now an MLB scout for the Twins. If you’ve read my blog for a while, you’ll know that I love when I have interactions with professional baseball players, so meeting one in my hotel was a definite highlight that got this day off to a good start.

After eating lunch, I got packed up and took the short walk over to the ballpark. I was insanely early, getting to the area something like four hours before the gates were scheduled to open. But, if you read my post about my first day in town, you’ll understand my excitement about the area known as The Battery, and I was eager to experience it again.

Being so close to the ballpark made for a nice, easy walk — and I also appreciated not having to pay for parking at any of the games. The walk took about 15 minutes, and I spent part of that time dawdling and enjoying the scenery. Here’s how things looked a few minutes after I set out from my hotel …

… and it wasn’t long before I could see SunTrust Park poking through the trees:

I talked in my previous blog post about just how easy it was to get to the ballpark on foot, thanks to a network of sidewalks, pathways and pedestrian bridges. I took so many photos as I approached the ballpark that I could probably produce a coffee table book entitled, “Views of SunTrust Park From the Sidewalk,” but instead of sharing all of them here, I thought I’d just share a few. Here’s the view from the bridge over the interstate. You can see the walkway and pedestrian bridge that will take you from this spot right up to the ballpark:

And here’s another view of the park from the mouth of the bridge:

What could this scene possibly look like as a panorama, you might ask? You’re in luck — I’ve got just the picture for you:

When I got closer to the park, I took a moment to check out the Phil Niekro statue, which was something that I don’t even recall seeing a day earlier because I was in such a hurry to get to the Chop House Gate:

I love statues like this, especially when they’re placed around the perimeter of ballparks. The Braves have done a really good job in this regard at SunTrust.

As you might know, Delta Air Lines is from Georgia, and has traditionally had a visible advertising presence at the different ballparks that the Braves have called home. This is true inside of SunTrust Park, but there’s also a cool Delta display outside of the third base gate — check out this actual vertical stabilizer off a Delta airplane:

Definitely a cool spot for a photo, right?

After walking around the third base gate for a bit, and headed toward The Battery, just as I did a day earlier. Today, though, I’d given myself more time to wander, so I had fun taking in the sights as I walked. Take a look at how beautiful this scene is:

I snapped that shot on my walk, and I was impressed at how clean and tidy everything around SunTrust Park was. I know it’s a new park, but I also know that things can quickly get messy unless there’s a top-notch maintenance crew working on the site, and that’s obviously the case here.

If you noticed the Bobby Cox statue in the image above, you’ve got a good eye. Here’s a better view of it:

This is one of the more unique ballpark statues that I’ve seen because of the use of the dugout wall and steps that the sculptor incorporated. (Of course, I might’ve preferred seeing a Bobby Cox ejection pose statue.)

Since there was no traffic, I went over to the roadway and walked down the center of it for a minute or so to capture this view of the area …

… and then took this shot of the exterior of Live! at the Battery Atlanta, which is an enormous restaurant and entertainment venue that even offers mechanical bull riding on select nights:

I then crossed back to the opposite side of the street and took this photo of the plaza that divides SunTrust Park, on the left, and the start of The Battery, on the right:

I spent the next little while slowly browsing through the Mizuno and the Baseballism stores, each of which I’d visited a day earlier but definitely wanted to see again. Then, it was time to head back over to the Chipper Jones Road to the Hall Pop-Up Experience and explore it a little more thoroughly. I’d been impressed with the selection of artifacts when I’d stopped in briefly a day earlier, but now I had the chance to finally check out one of the space’s prime attractions — the actual Braves dugout bench from Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, which Jones and the Braves used from 1993 through 1996. Even better than seeing it was the chance to sit on it, which is exactly what I did:

Eventually, I made my way back toward the Chop House Gate, which was still pretty quiet. I snapped this photo of the big Atlanta Braves sign that stretches overhead …

… and then set out to find a way to get up there. I wasn’t sure if this bridge was open to fans or only to authorized personnel, but I figured that I’d do my best to see if I could get up there. There’s a restaurant at each end of the bridge, so I started by going into the one at the left of the bridge in the photo above. The restaurant wasn’t busy because it was the middle of the afternoon, so I just sort of walked with a purpose until I found a set of stairs, went up it and discovered a second-level patio that was empty. I made my way through it until I was standing here:

Success!

I have no idea whether I was supposed to be up there or not, so I quickly got busy enjoying the 360-degree view around me, as well as snapping a bunch of photos. Here’s a view of the Chop House Gate, the First & Third restaurant, the Omni Hotel and the Georgia Power Pavilion from above:

And here’s a look at The Battery, including a bunch of the residences, from my elevated position:

I spent a few more minutes in that spot, enjoying the surroundings, before retracing my steps back to ground level and continuing to wander around. After taking several steps away from the bridge that I’d just been on, I took this panorama that shows the scene:

Pretty soon, there was a live band — Summer Brooke and the Mountain Faith Band — starting to get ready to play on the pavilion stage, so I walked over there, found a place to sit in the shade, and watched it for a little bit:

After a couple of songs, and feeling refreshed from the shade, I headed back to The Battery to check out the sights. It starting to fill up now as game time got closer, and that brought out more attractions. Chief among them was this street performer, who was hugely entertaining to watch:

His ability to not only stay still for long stretches at a time, but the comic relief that he’d provide by moving just as an unsuspecting passerby thought he was a statue, was highly entertaining, and a large crowd was soon gathered around him. I watched for a few minutes, and then browsed through a few of the shops to not only get more of the area’s experience, but to also enjoy some A/C.  The cool air in the shops was refreshing, but I soon headed off to find a cold drink, and spontaneously bought a margarita from a restaurant in The Battery called Goldbergs:

It’s actually a bagel restaurant, but they were inexplicably selling margaritas and other cold drinks from a cart on the sidewalk, and I couldn’t resist. It felt very resort-like to walk around the area and sip on this drink — but the knowledge that SunTrust Park’s gates would soon be opening quickly snapped me out of any all-inclusive resort daydreams I might have been experiencing.

After I finished my cold drink, I headed back toward the gates, which were much more active by this time. The live music had ended, but there was a big game of Wiffle ball taking place on the pavilion turf, and jugglers and other performers were also making the rounds. I enjoyed the scene from a few vantage points, and then took a spot near the head of the line.

As soon as the gates opened, I went straight to the seats in center field, where I checked out the pond/fountain display and the batter’s eye beyond it:

It very much reminded me of the display at Coors Field in Denver, which I visited a few seasons ago.

Next, I followed the concourse around to the area behind the visitors dugout on the first base side, where I enjoyed the scene for a brief period …

… before finding the netting annoying and deciding to seek another vantage point.

As always, there’s a part of me that can understand the reason for the netting … but I absolutely loathe it.

My next view of SunTrust Park was thankfully unobstructed. I’d climbed all the way up to the upper deck and, unlike a day earlier when I’d spent a lot of time down the third base line, I went straight to the seats behind home plate. From here, I had this outstanding view of this beautiful park:

I was in no hurry to escape this view, so I grabbed a seat and just sat and enjoyed for a few minutes, occasionally checking my Twitter account.

Then, I decided to do a little exploring of the upper deck. One of the unique things I noticed in this area was the walkways behind the seating sections. There’s a normal upper-level concourse that you can walk along, but in several spots, you climb up and walk across these areas to get into the seating bowl:

If you were to glance at the scene above, you might think that I was in a prohibited area, but that wasn’t the case. It’s definitely a unique way of reaching your seat in the upper deck.

I next checked out the ballpark from the first base side of home plate, which provided this view:

After taking this photo, I decided to set off in search of something to eat. One thing had caught my eye at a nearby concession stand earlier, and while there were still lots of worthy choices around the ballpark, I made a bit of an impulse purchase with this meal. It was called the Spec-Tator:

Here’s a breakdown:

  • Smoked jumbo potato, wrapped in bacon
  • Jalapeno cheddar sausage, stuffed inside of said potato
  • Topped with cheese, sour cream and green onions

Sounds ridiculously awesome, right?

Awesome, it was not.

In fact, I think I can safely put this meal at the very top of the “Worst Thing I’ve Ever Eaten at a Ballpark” list. Don’t get me wrong — the idea of the Spec-Tator was cool, but the execution was incredibly flawed. For starters, the potato wasn’t remotely cooked through, so much of it was inedibly hard. Speaking of uncooked, a lot of the bacon that wrapped around it was barely cooked and had a slimy consistency. The sausage inside of the potato was also underdone, and had a terrible gelatinous texture. And, to add insult to injury, the cheese in this dish was actually a ladle of oily nacho “cheese,” which is one of my top ballpark nemeses. In fairness, the sour cream and green onions were fine — but it’s hard to get them wrong, right?

Know what wasn’t fine, though? Spending $15 for this, taking two bites and then tossing the entire thing in the nearest trash can. I perhaps could’ve returned to the concession stand to explain the situation and get my meal replaced, but after just a couple of bites, I wasn’t in the mood for eating another Spec-Tator in this lifetime.

As a lover of ballpark food, it’s always disappointing when I eat something that doesn’t deliver — and it’s also disappointing not to be able to share my excitement about the meal with you. Fortunately, more ballpark meals are good than awful, but it’s a letdown when I run into something that sits firmly in the “awful” category.

Fortunately, even a bad meal wasn’t going to leave a bad taste in my mouth about SunTrust Park. I put the Spec-Tator firmly out of my mind and continued to explore the upper deck. My next stop was high above the right field foul pole, where I could clearly see the pool deck at the nearby Omni Hotel — including some guests who were wearing Braves gear and would undoubtedly be watching the game from the deck once it got underway:

From here, I also took took this shot of me with the field in the background — and with my red road trip shirt, which you might recognize from this visit to Target Field a season earlier:

By this time, the grounds crew had just about finished getting the field ready for play, so I went back down to the main concourse and watched the scene from an outfield seat for a few minutes. Then, I headed past the Sandlot kids’ play area, snapping this shot to show the hotel’s pool deck and some assembled fans from a different angle:

I watched the first inning from an outfield seat, and then went up to the upper deck on the third base side to watch the next couple of innings, where I had this amazing view as the sun set to my right:

 

It was fun to watch a bit of the action, but I was soon anxious to continue to exploring the park. I went back down to the concourse and checked out the team shop. Immediately outside of the shop, I paused to snap this impressive sight:

This is a Braves tomahawk that is made out of 17,257 Lego bricks, made by a Lego enthusiast from nearby Alpharetta named Jason Williams.

Next, I headed straight toward Monument Garden, which I’d visited a couple of times a day earlier but was eager to check out again. Here’s another neat display that you’ll find in this spot — a staggering 755 bats positioned to recognize Hank Aaron’s 755 career home runs:

I probably spent about an inning in Monument Garden, and then took another big lap around the concourse before heading back to the seating bowl to check in on the game. And that’s how I spent the remainder of this game — a bit of time in the seating bowl, and then a bit of time walking around the concourse.

As I’d done a day earlier, I left SunTrust Park promptly after the last out, and was back in my hotel about 10 minutes later — ready to crash after a long, outstanding day in and around this tremendous National League ballpark.

Atlanta Braves – August 30, 2018

After three outstanding days watching the Knights in Charlotte, I got up early on the morning of August 30, took the bus to from uptown Charlotte to Charlotte Douglas International Airport, and boarded a Delta flight to Atlanta a couple of hours later.

The flight from Charlotte to Atlanta was just 70 minutes, and I was standing in the terminal of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the busiest airport in the world, a few minutes after noon — or, more importantly, about 7.5 hours before the Braves would host the Chicago Cubs at SunTrust Park.

SunTrust Park opened at the start of the 2017 season, and I’d originally planned to visit later that year. Those plans didn’t pan out, though, and I knew that getting to Atlanta in 2018 would be a priority of mine. The park has earned rave reviews from a lot of people, so I was eager for the opportunity to see it a few times on this visit.

The ballpark, located in Cobb County, rather than in Atlanta itself, is about a 30-minute drive north of the airport. As soon as I picked up my rental car (a Jeep Cherokee for this trip, which I was definitely loving), I drove straight to Cobb County. Before I checked into my hotel, I hit a nearby Target to grab some snacks for the next three days, and also picked up lunch, which I ate in the parking lot of my hotel because I had arrived well before check-in time. About 2 p.m., I decided to see if my room was open, and I was happy to learn that it was. My hotel was so close to the ballpark that I was hoping I could see it from my window, so as soon as I got into my room, I went straight to the window and looked out. Unfortunately, I was situated on the other side of the building, which meant no ballpark view. And, while my view of I-75 wasn’t exactly thrilling …

… I was pleased at how bright the sky was and how perfect the day appeared to be for baseball.

I didn’t spend long in my room, though. As soon as I’d made a couple of trips from my vehicle to my room to get everything unloaded, I changed shirts (into this one) and began the walk over to the park.

My hotel was just one mile from SunTrust Park, which made for an easy walk — although it also made for a very hot one, as I was quickly learning that the Georgia heat was stifling. To get to SunTrust, I walked up a street called Interstate North Parkway, and then turned right onto Windy Ridge Parkway Southeast, which spans across I-75. I mention these roads because of the many ways to get to this ballpark on foot, I think that this way is one of the best. As you walk across I-75, SunTrust Park comes into full sight ahead of you, and it’s an anticipatory and exciting scene that looked like this after I crossed over the bridge:

See the pedestrian bridge on the right side of the photo? I crossed over just a moment after I took the above photo, and was soon standing near the third base gate and looking up at the sunny SunTrust Park sign:

While I was tempted to start exploring the immediate area, I knew that I’d have plenty of time to do so over the coming few days. My priority was to get over to the Chop House Gate, which is the place to be at SunTrust Park. This gate appears at one end of an area called The Battery which, with no hyperbole, is probably the coolest spot that I’ve seen in all my travels.

The first photo that I took in this area was of the enormous Atlanta Braves lettering, which is mounted to a footbridge that extends between the end of The Battery and SunTrust Park itself:

I also grabbed a quick shot of myself in this spot, in which I’m wearing my stars and stripes shirt:

As you can see, this area was pretty quiet at the time — but that’s only because I was mega early. I’d soon find out just how popular and festive this spot would be. I also couldn’t resist getting a photo of one of the wooden Chop On signs, which appear in a few locations around the ballpark and make for cool photo ops. Being alone during this visit, and with no one close enough to take my photo, I had to settle for a photo of the sign by itself:

Here’s another shot that I took a few minutes later:

The buildings here are the Omni Hotel, barely visible at the left, and the Comcast building. The turfed area is known as the Georgia Power Pavilion, and it’s a really popular spot for fans. During my various visits to SunTrust Park, I saw this space being used for Wiffle ball, a live concert and flag football.

This next photo is of the hotel, which definitely provides one of the most impressive hotel/baseball experiences that I’ve ever seen. In addition to being ultra fancy and new, it has an elevated pool deck from which you can see into SunTrust Park. Many of the hotel’s balconies face the field, too, and I saw a ton of fans hanging out on the pool deck and on their balconies to watch the game:

Pretty soon, I met up with Caroline Burleson, the Braves corporate communications manager, for a private tour through SunTrust Park before the gates opened. It was something that I’d been eagerly anticipating in the weeks leading up to my trip, and I can certainly tell you that it was a major highlight for me. We met at the Chop House Gate and entered the ballpark a couple of hours before the gates were set to open, and then spent the next hour or so checking out a bunch of the highlights.

The first place we visited was the kids’ play area known as the Sandlot, which is located just to the right of the Chop House Gate once you enter. It’s got a really impressive selection of carnival-style games, a climbing wall and more, but the biggest attraction is an actual zip line for kids — definitely the first one that I’ve ever seen inside of a ballpark. In the photo below, the carnival games are located in the red brick structure running down the left side, while the zip line platform is elevated on the right in the distance:

We next went out to the seats in left-center, where Caroline pointed out the Coors Light Chop House in right field, which has climate-controlled seating indoors and bar-style seating outdoors:

Did you notice the opening in the right field fence? That’s an area known as Below the Chop, which is a private group area that puts you not only at field level, but also just a handful of feet behind the right fielder.

While we stood in the outfield seats, I couldn’t resist snapping this photo of the quiet ballpark:

As you can see, the batting cage was set up, but none of the screens had yet been moved into position, so it was neat to see SunTrust Park at such a dormant time. It was also exciting to see all of the different levels of seating and know that I’d be doing some serious exploring over the next few days.

We continued our tour by walking through the concourse behind the left field seats …

… stopping at various points so that Caroline could point out the different features along the way. One neat thing that we soon came across was the Mizuno Glove Experience, which was yet another thing that I’d never seen elsewhere before my visit to SunTrust Park:

There are two Mizuno booths at the ballpark, and they’re both there to give you a chance to borrow a baseball glove for your visit. To do so, you authorize a small hold on your credit card, which is reversed when you return the glove at the end of the game, and you can choose anything from a youth glove to a Chipper Jones signature glove. You can then use the glove during BP and the game in an attempt to snag a ball. I can see this idea being really appealing. Although I usually enjoy taking my glove to the ballpark, I don’t travel with it when I fly to games. I don’t check my luggage, so when it comes to devoting carry-on bag space to my glove versus some extra clothing, I have to opt for the latter. Having a kiosk like this is thus a perfect idea for people in a similar position to me.

Our next stop was one of the places in SunTrust Park that you could easily spend a lot of time browsing, and I was super fortunate to get to check it before there were any crowds competing for space. It’s called Monument Garden, and gives you a chance to walk through the team’s history with plenty of interesting artifacts displayed in a really picturesque way. The area also features the Braves Hall of Fame, so there are a ton of plaques and other displays that are worth reading. Here’s how it looks from the front:

And here’s a look back at Monument Garden after we’d finished walking through it:

There are too many highlights in this area to list and depict, so I’ll encourage you to devote some time to this space whenever you visit SunTrust Park. I will, however, share a few of my favorite sights.

Seeing the Braves 1995 World Series trophy was definitely a highlight …

… as was browsing this display that showed how the team’s uniforms have changed over the years:

There was also a display that recognized the multiple MVPs, Cy Young Award winners, Silver Slugger Award winners, Rawlings Gold Glove Award winners and Rookie of the Year Award winners from throughout the team’s history:

I’m sure that I could’ve spent an hour in Monument Garden — and I definitely returned during my subsequent visits to SunTrust Park — but there were more things to see and do, so Caroline soon led me up to the second level, where we went out to the seats for a moment to check out the view:

From here, I could clearly see a number of cool seating areas that the ballpark offers, starting with the Coca-Cola Corner up top, which we’d soon be visiting, and the Hank Aaron Terrace. I could also see a pair of Cubs playing catch on the field below, which is the type of sight that always makes me excited to be at a ballpark.

Our next stop was the upscale Infiniti Club on the terrace level, which was definitely an area that I’d have been unable to visit without Caroline’s help. It’s holds the ballpark’s suites and has an amazing common area with plenty of pictures of players and managers from throughout the team’s history. Here’s a look at the bar/dining area of the club:

We then went over to the Hank Aaron Terrace, which had some display pieces that rivaled Monument Garden, as far as I’m concerned. It’s not the best photo because the lighting was pretty challenging, but how’s this for a sight?

This is the bat that Aaron used to hit his 715th home run, as well as the ball that he hit. Truly hall of fame-worthy stuff, right?

The Hank Aaron Terrace was ultra swanky with a variety of seating options including these that faced the field. What a view!

As I mentioned a bit ago, we then made our way up — way, way up — to the Coca-Cola Corner, which is high above left field. It was one of my favorite places to visit for several reasons. Here’s the scene from one end:

I absolutely love how the ground is covered in turf. It makes this spot seem field-like and special, and I love the bright red accents throughout. There were lots of photo-worthy scenes in this area, including an enormous chair that I had to sit in for a moment:

Our last stop in SunTrust Park was the Xfinity Rooftop, located high in the right field corner, essentially across the field from the Coca-Cola Corner. It’s a group area that offers a fantastic view of the field, as you can see here:

In addition to upscale amenities, such as bar seating, couches, big TVs, and more, this area has table tennis, foosball and cornhole games, and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t notice that there was a Waffle House concession stand just a few steps away.

Our time in SunTrust Park drawing to a close, but that didn’t mean that my tour was over just yet. Next up, we spent some time walking through The Battery, making a stop at the Chipper Jones — Road to the Hall Pop-Up Experience. The Battery has an empty storefront that is used for rotating exhibits, and that’s exactly what the Jones experience was. The longtime Braves third baseman (and occasional outfielder) was inducted in the hall of fame last season, and this pop-up museum was all about celebrating Jones’ career. There were a bunch of Jones-related artifacts throughout the exhibit, including the actual sign that hung at Turner Field after the Braves retired Jones’ #10:

There were also several life-size Jones cutouts, including this one …

… and a selection of mannequins wearing Jones’ various Braves uniforms:

After the pop-up experience, Caroline left me to explore The Battery on my own, but I’ve got to give her a huge thank you for sharing her time and expertise with me. Truly an outstanding experience and one that I won’t forget!

SunTrust Park’s gates hadn’t yet opened, and that suited me just fine because I was really eager to explore The Battery. If this is the first you’ve heard of this area, let me take a moment to explain it a little before I take you on my walk around it.

Picture an upscale pedestrian neighborhood. Restaurants and shops line the picturesque streets, and SunTrust Park is never more than a few minutes’ walk away. I can safely say that this area is the best space around a ballpark that I’ve ever encountered, and while I haven’t been to every stadium yet, I have a hard time picturing anything that could top The Battery. One thing that continuously struck me was how neat and tidy everything was — it was as though I was walking through the photos in the pages of some sort of a Utopian tourism magazine.

Here’s a look down the length of one of the sections:

Check out just how gorgeous everything looks. And did you see the residences on the second level of the building on the left? I can’t imagine how amazing it would be to live in this area. Here’s another look at the same block, but from the other direction. You can see the residences more easily from this angle, and that’s SunTrust Park’s light posts poking over the top of the trees:

The selection of restaurants in The Battery was truly outstanding. You could grab some fast food — pizza, burgers, fried chicken and more — or you could sit down for a meal at any number of high-end eateries — steak, seafood and so on. The shopping options were amazing, too. Two of my favorites were the Baseballism store and a Mizuno retailer that had a huge selection of gloves, cleats and bats. Because SunTrust Park is new, so too is The Battery — and it’s always adding new things. New restaurants, an escape room, a hotel and more are slated to be added to this area soon.

Here’s a shot of one of the streets that runs through The Battery, although I should note that the streets are closed off prior to games, so fans can walk anywhere with ease:

The ballpark’s gates were going to be opening shortly, so I wrapped up my walk through The Battery and made my way over to the Chop House Gate. Normally, I like to be among the first fans in line, but since I’d already had a tour through the park and was so thoroughly enjoying my visit to The Battery, I got to the gate and lined up about 30 fans back. It wasn’t too long before the gates opened, and as soon as I got inside, I went down to the seats in left-center to watch BP for a few minutes:

I didn’t spend long in this spot, though, and headed over to the Braves Authentics Store, which carries a wide selection of game-used products. As much as I love team shops at MLB stadiums, I always love when a team has a game-used shop or kiosk, and get a kick out of browsing the various items. As always, I was tempted to add a game-used base to my collection …

… but knew that it wouldn’t remotely fit in my carry-on bag, so I’d have to pass. One day, I tell you, I’ll own an MLB base!

By now, I’d been walking for several hours, between my walk to the ballpark, my tour, my trip through The Battery, and more, and I was in need of something to cool down. Refreshment came in the form of a frozen lemonade, which is always one of my favorite ballpark treats. I took it all the way up to the upper deck to enjoy some shade, and ate/drank it with this view:

After this snack, I went back down to the main concourse, and as amazed at how many Cubs fans there were. I’d seen hundreds of people in Cubs shirts, jerseys and caps when I’d been in The Battery before the game, and I don’t think it’s a stretch to suggest there were more fans with Cubs apparel than with Braves apparel. There was quite a crowd around the zip line, so I took a walk over there and watched a handful of kids trying it out, including this young man:

I spent the rest of the time up until first pitch walking around the main concourse, stopping here and there to check out the sights and just generally loving this ballpark. At one point, I went out to the outfield seats in right-center to shoot this panorama:

Then, once the game began, I set off in search of some dinner. I’d been scouring the SunTrust Park concession stands since I got in, and I have to say that I was thoroughly impressed with many of the offerings. That said, I kept it simple for this game with a visit to one of the Waffle House stands. I’d never previously been to a Waffle House in my life, and the idea of visiting one in a ballpark was appealing. Plus, Waffle House is originally from Georgia.

The SunTrust Park Waffle House concessions don’t have full menus, obviously, but they do have a handful of items that people will likely find appealing. I bought a cheesesteak melt hash brown bowl. It may sound excessive, and I can assure you that it absolutely was:

You’re looking at a heap of hash browns and onions, topped with minced steak and cheese. It was actually pretty tasty, although I feel as though I could’ve flown all the way home by flapping my arms and still not burned off this dish’s calories. Still, I’m glad to have finally have some Waffle House food, and it seemed fitting to do in Georgia.

Instead of heading off in search of some new adventure after I’d finished eating, I stayed in that spot to just enjoy the view for a couple of innings. Then, I went to find something sweet to counteract the saltiness of my dinner, and found it in the form of a peach milkshake from the Chick-Fil-A — another Georgia company — concession stand:

I’d never had a Chick-Fil-A milkshake in the past, and have to admit that it was very good. And my choice of peach was intentional, given that Georgia is, of course, the Peach State.

After I’d had my milkshake, I spent a bit of time on the first base side, and then went back over to the upper deck in left field where I’d eaten dinner. I’d noticed a cool visual effect in this area that I’d missed earlier, and wanted to check it out. I find that the upper decks of some MLB stadiums can be really dark at night, which some fans may not find inviting. The upper deck overhang at SunTrust Park has a neat glow emanating from it, which really boosts the visual appeal of this area:

I remained in the upper deck for a little bit longer, and then went back down to take a tour of the main concourse, stopping again at the authentics store, the main team shop and Monument Garden. About halfway through the game, I went back to the seating bowl, found a spot in the upper deck and remained there for the duration.

I left SunTrust Park pretty promptly after the game’s final out, stopping to snap this photo on the walk back to my hotel:

And as always, I was anxious to get back to the ballpark the next day.

Ball of the Day – 3 of 4

Over the last two days, I’ve posted autographed balls from 1970 AL MVP Boog Powell and two-time National League All-Star Justin Upton.

Today, I’m posting the third autographed ball I got on my most recent road trip for The Ballpark Guide, which took me through Pennsylvania, Maryland and eventually to D.C.

This ball comes from someone taken second overall in the 2002 MLB Entry Draft — Justin’s brother, B.J. Upton:

B.J. hasn’t been an All-Star like Justin, but he has hit for the cycle, doing so back in 2009. He’s played his whole career with Tampa Bay and I’ve seen him play live a number of times. I bought this MLB-authenticated ball at Nationals Park, just as I did with the one signed by Justin. Both balls were a good deal, and I thought it’d be neat to have signatures from both guys.

One last ball tomorrow!