Tagged: ballpark food

Syracuse Chiefs – April 18, 2018

A little more than 12 hours after I’d thawed out following a frigid but fun visit to NBT Bank Stadium in Syracuse, I was back at the International League ballpark for a doubleheader that was set to begin at 10:30 a.m. The previous day’s wintry weather had canceled the second game of a scheduled doubleheader, so the teams tacked that game onto the end of the matinee game on this day, and I was thrilled to be able to take in both contests before driving home.

As is often the case with April matinee games, it was Education Day at the ballpark — and that meant that a lot of students would be in attendance. I planned to get to the park well in advance of the gates opening up and the students arriving so that I could enjoy the quiet scene for a bit. As soon as I got in, I went straight to the upper deck in the left field corner. A couple Chiefs pitchers were throwing bullpen sessions, and while I always enjoy watching such moments, I didn’t want to awkwardly stand right at field level. From my spot in the front row of the upper deck, I could not only enjoy watching the action in the Syracuse bullpen below me, but also take in the great view of the park that the upper deck provides:

I watched the scene from this area for a while, and then made my way over to the visitors side of the field to watch the Indianapolis Indians after they’d taken the field. A day earlier, it’d been funny to watch the players warming up in the cold and snow flurries. Today, the flurries were gone but the cold remained — as you can probably tell by the hat choice of Indians pitcher Clay Holmes:

And, while his teammates might not have been quite as cold as they were the last time I watched them, many of them were still wearing assorted pieces of extra clothing to keep the chills at bay:

My next stop was back over to the Syracuse side. By now, starting pitcher Austin Voth had taken the bullpen mound to begin to warm up, so I grabbed a spot in the front row and snapped a bunch of pictures of him, including this one:

I knew there’d be a chance that once the students in attendance decided it was time to eat, there could be some lineups at the concession stands, so I headed to the concourse to get my first meal of the day shortly before first pitch. A handful of concession stands had been closed a day earlier because of the weather, but I’m happy to report that everything was open on this day — and that meant that I could get an item I’d been reading about in advance of this visit. The Chiefs introduced three new hot dogs for the 2018 season, and the one that caught my eye was the salt potato hot dog. Salt potatoes are a big thing in Syracuse and other spots in New York (I ate them years ago at a Tri-City ValleyCats game, actually). The hot dog in question was pretty simple — a regular hot dog loaded with salt potatoes:

The Hofmann hot dogs served at NBT Bank Stadium are probably my favorite dogs of any ballpark, so the idea of adding potatoes with butter, salt and pepper was a winner. I will say, though, that I think this hot dog could’ve used a little something else in the flavor department. Of course, I could’ve added a flavorful condiment such as mustard, but it felt as though it was a little more bland than I’d have liked. Still, it was a good hot dog overall, and the unique topping of the salt potatoes made it fun to eat.

During my visit to NBT Bank Stadium a day earlier, I hadn’t spent any time sitting behind home plate, so doing so was definitely a priority for the doubleheader. I spent the first couple innings on the Jim Beam Party Deck in right field, but then went and grabbed a spot in the front row. It’s always a fun challenge to shoot action photos from this spot, and the action doesn’t necessarily have to be a hitter making contact with the ball — here’s a shot I snapped of Indianapolis infielder Kevin Kramer at the point of being hit by a pitch thrown by David Goforth:

Later in that inning, I got this shot of Indians outfielder Jordan Luplow taking a hack:

As you might know, I’m always on the lookout for unusual sights at the ballpark, including those related to players’ uniforms. I’ve had my pictures included in ESPN’s Uni Watch blog a number of times, so finding subtle and bizarre uniform-related minutiae is always something I enjoy. Case in point, here’s a picture of Chiefs catcher Tuffy Gosewisch walking toward the home dugout:

Notice anything unique about him?

You might have seen that he’s wearing Seattle Mariners pants, as evidenced by the colors of the MLB logo on the belt tunnel. I’ve noticed that a lot of guys who’ve bounced between Triple-A and the big leagues wear their big league pants with their Triple-A jerseys, but I think this is the first time that I’ve seen a mismatch in organizations — the Chiefs are affiliated with the Washington Nationals, not the Mariners. Gosewisch, though, played 11 games for Seattle last season, which explains the pants.

In the fifth inning of the game, I noticed that Syracuse had a no-hitter going. It may seem funny, but I tend not to notice such accomplishments as quickly as you might think. I’m normally so focused on exploring the ballpark, taking photos — and, yes, sometimes eating — that I’m not usually watching the scoreboard. As soon as I saw the goose eggs, though, I was fixated on the action. I decided that if the Chiefs were able to toss a no-no, I’d want to get some pictures from above. I headed to the upper deck and, after Austin Adams got Erich Weiss to strike out to end the game, I snapped this shot of the initial celebration:

I should note, of course, that there are a couple unique points about this no-hitter. Four Chiefs pitchers shared it, and it only went seven innings, given that MiLB doubleheader games are this length. Still, an impressive accomplishment, especially given the chilly conditions. This is actually the second no-hitter I’ve seen in two seasons. Last summer, at an independent game in Ottawa, Canada, I watched former MLBer Phillippe Aumont toss a no-no against the Dominican Republic National Team.)

Here’s the video board showing the score after the final out:

I got some reprieve from the cold conditions by hanging out in the Hank Sauer Room between games of the doubleheader. As had been the case a day earlier, the Chiefs had opened up this room for fans looking for a little warmth, and it was nice to be able to warm up a little as I waited for the second game of the twin bill to begin.

Like I’d done earlier in the day, I grabbed some food right before first pitch. For my second meal of the day, I opted for an order of spicy fried cheese curds, which came with some ranch dipping sauce:

I actually had fried cheese curds at Target Field last fall, and while they were good, I’d give the nod to those I ate in Syracuse. The NBT Bank Stadium curds were more gooey, which was a big plus, and the spiciness was a nice addition, too.

As you might’ve noticed, I ate the curds in the upper deck above the first base side, which was a spot in which I’d snagged a pair of foul balls a day earlier. Not long after I finished my meal, another ball came soaring my way. This one was off the bat of Indians pitcher Casey Sadler, and it marked the fourth and final foul ball I’d gotten on this trip. And, for the record, the first foul ball in my collection hit by a pitcher, as far as I can recall:

From a similar vantage point in the upper deck, I noticed for the first time that my hotel for this visit, Embassy Suites by Hilton Syracuse Destiny USA, had an ad on the outfield fence:

 

That’s because this hotel is the official hotel of the Chiefs, and I wholeheartedly recommend it for baseball fans visiting the city. In my last blog post, I mentioned its awesome proximity to both the ballpark and Destiny USA, the sixth-largest mall in the U.S., but it’s worth noting a few other features if you’re thinking about staying in this hotel during your next visit to Syracuse. One of the things I love about the Embassy Suites brand is the complimentary made-to-order breakfasts. A lot of hotels have free breakfasts, but they’re generally pretty basic. At this hotel, I got to enjoy made-to-order omelets each morning, as well as a number of other items that had me feeling full and ready for the cold weather. Another cool food-related note is that there’s a reception for guests each evening with complimentary drinks and appetizers, served around this stylish space:

I can’t say enough good things about the guest rooms, either. Mine was spacious and extremely clean, with a big bathroom and a small kitchen area that definitely came in handy. Here’s the desk that I used for much of the visit:

From here, I could not only work on my blog while watching a wall-mounted TV across the room, but also keep an eye out the window to see what the weather was doing.

This hotel will definitely be my choice when I get back to Syracuse to see the Chiefs in action — and, hopefully, it won’t be that long before that happens.

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Syracuse Chiefs – April 17, 2018

It’s impossible for me to understate how much I dislike talking about the weather, hearing about the weather and thinking about the weather.

That said, weather did play a major factor in this week’s trip to Syracuse, so it’s going to come up a time or two in this blog post.

Weather is, of course, the biggest obstacle to face during April baseball road trips. I’ve been rained out, snowed out and shivered for hours in ballparks during games in the first month of the season. It’s probably smartest to wait until May to take a baseball trip, but when you’re eager to get your road tripping season underway, games in April are ever so tempting.

I scheduled three days in Syracuse a few weeks back because the Chiefs schedule was favorable — there were games Monday and Tuesday night, plus a bonus matinee game on Wednesday that I could attend before the three-hour drive home. As the trip approached, though, and winter returned to not only where I live in Canada, but also to New York and several other states, I’d be lying if I told you I wasn’t concerned about seeing any baseball on this trip.

We got hit with an ice storm on the weekend before I left, which meant that I had plenty of scraping to do before I could even see out my car windows enough to get on the road. The ice had turned to rain by the time I pulled out of my driveway at 9 a.m. on Monday, and I made it all the way to Syracuse without ever turning the windshield wipers off. I checked into my hotel about 2 p.m., and figured that there’d be no way the Chiefs would host the Indianapolis Indians at 6:35 p.m., so I vigilantly checked Twitter for updates on the game’s status. Big kudos to the Chiefs for canceling the game in a timely manner. Even though I love going to any ballpark, the idea of standing around in the rain for an hour or two, only to then hear that the game has been postponed, isn’t that appealing — and this is especially true when it’s 35 degrees!

The postponement meant that the Chiefs and Indians would square off the following afternoon, April 17, and even though snow was in the forecast for that day, I was hopeful I’d get to see at least some baseball.

With game one of the twin bill scheduled for 4 p.m., I pulled into the NBT Bank Stadium parking lot two hours early and parked, and then took a quick and chilly walk around to enjoy the stadium from the exterior. Here’s the first picture I took:

If you think that the conditions look cold in this image, you’re definitely right. The temperatures remained in the 30s and the constant wind made it feel much colder than that. I approached the gates and snapped this shot, which I think looks cool:

I then entered the stadium, went up to the concourse level and was excited to see the field for the first time. I figured that batting practice wouldn’t be taking place, and I was correct. The tarp was on the field and there were flurries in the air, but I was happy to be in the ballpark:

I’ve been to NBT Bank Stadium enough that I didn’t feel a huge need to run around and start taking in all the sights. That said, there were some new additions since I last visited in 2015, so I wanted to check them out. One big and noticeable difference is that five of the seating sections in the upper deck are now tarped off. I’m sure management is never thrilled about having to do this, but I commend the Chiefs on using five different tarp images, including three of the team’s logos. The use of these tarps, rather than just plain ones, add to the look of the park. Here’s a panorama from the corner in left field. You can see three tarps in the foreground and two across the field:

The biggest addition since my last visit — and one I’m sure that management is excited about — is the Jim Beam Party Deck beyond right field. I’ve always felt that the one knock on NBT Bank Stadium has been its lack of outfield seating, which is fairly common among parks of its age. I always love a ballpark that has a concourse that wraps around the entire field, and while that’s not the case in Syracuse, the addition of an expansive party deck that allows you to hang out in the outfield is a big upgrade. Here’s how the deck looks from above:

And here’s how the view from this area looked just a few minutes after the Indians took the field and began to play catch:

The party deck is an appealing hangout. There are picnic tables and bistro tables, as well as a wide railing along the entire front edge of the deck to comfortably hold your food and drink. The deck can accommodate up to 300 people and booking it for your group includes an all-you-can-eat menu. Here’s one more view of the deck:

I watched a few minutes of Indianapolis’ warmup from this area, and then headed back toward home plate when it became evident that the infield tarp was about to be removed — something that is always a welcome sight for baseball fans. After it was gone, I was excited to see the field for the first time:

There were just a few snow flurries in the air before and after the tarp removed, but nothing of concern. The temperature and the wind, however, were bitter. The open concourse at NBT Bank Stadium is perfect because you can always see the field as you’re walking around or waiting in line at the concession stands, but it wasn’t providing much refuge from the wind. Once the gates opened, I hurried into the team shop not just to browse the items, but also to enjoy the warmth — it was definitely the warmest spot in the park. I spent about five minutes in the shop, and then went back outside to brave the elements. In a few minutes, the players would be heading back out to the field, and I wanted to see them come out. As the Indians came out, the flurries started to pick up. The scene felt pretty bizarre, and I could tell that as cold as the players were, they were also a little amused by the weather conditions. Here’s Indians infielder Kevin Newman (who was one of two players who talked to me about my shirt last year in Binghamton) surrounded by flurries as he played catch:

An here’s outfielder Jordan Luplow (who I saw hit a walk-off home run on the last day of the Jamestown Jammers franchise back in 2014) who was wearing ninja-style gear to keep the wind and cold at bay:

By the time starting pitcher Nick Kingham toed the bullpen rubber — after I overhead him joking that his water bottle might freeze — the flurries had intensified:

The increasingly poor weather initially had me concerned about the game getting underway, but as quickly as the snow would worsen, it would then lighten. As first pitch approached, no sort of delay seemed to be imminent. Here’s how the scene looked just four minutes before the game began:

Did you notice the emptiness of the stands? So did I — in fact, I’d never been to a game that was this sparsely attended. Then again, this was the coldest game I’d ever been to, and the only one with snow. I hardly blame Syracuse residents for staying at home on this afternoon. I should note, in fairness, that most of the fans who were at the game were up on the concourse to get shelter from the flurries. That said, I estimate fewer than 100 people were at the game.

As the game began, I headed out to the party deck to enjoy the view of the field from this new vantage point:

Playing right field for the Chiefs was Alejandro De Aza, who’s suited up for more than 800 MLB games in his career. It was clear throughout the contest that he was having a hard time with the snow while he tracked down fly balls. A couple times after making catches, I saw him shaking his head, wiping at his eyes and muttering something in Spanish.

While I was super hopeful of a home run being hit to right field, I also knew that the cold air made that less likely to happen. Being the only fan on the party deck, I would’ve easily been able to track down any balls hit over the fence, but if you know me, you know that I don’t stay put in any given spot for too long. After the top of the first inning, I decided to head back down the concourse and go to the upper deck, where there wasn’t a single other fan. During my 2013 visit, I snagged a pair of foul balls in the upper deck, and I knew I’d have another one without having to wait too long. The second batter for the Chiefs, Adrian Sanchez, hit a foul ball that landed a section away from me, and I was able to easily retrieve it:

You might notice the lack of flurries in the photo above. That’s how the game’s early innings went. There’d be thick flurries, followed by clear conditions — the one constant was the bitter cold.

In the second inning, I took advantage of a brief lull in the flurries to grab dinner. A few of the concession stands at NBT Bank Stadium were closed, likely due to the weather and the small crowds, but that was fine with me. As part of the team’s Taco Tuesday promotion, there was a kiosk in the concourse selling three beef or chicken tacos for $8. I opted for the former, and the staff member told me that I was the first one to buy them on this day — and, by extension, on the season, given that this was the team’s first Taco Tuesday promotion of 2018. The tacos were tasty, and about on par with the soft tacos from Taco Bell. They were definitely something that I’d enjoy ordering again:

While I was eating, another foul flew up toward me. This one was off the bat of outfielder Rafael Bautista, and because I was still the only fan in the upper deck, I was able to walk over and pick up the baseball with tacos in hand:

Shortly after I finished my dinner, the flurries once again picked up. I made my way over to the upper deck on the third base side, where I shot some snowy action pictures, including this one of infielder Kevin Kramer:

During another short lull in the flurries, I headed to the Dunkin’ Donuts concession stand on the third base side — another new addition since my last visit — and bought a hot chocolate, which I enjoyed in the upper deck:

The flurries intensified to the point that there was a 20-minute delay in the game after three innings. The grounds crew covered up home plate and the mound, but didn’t use the big tarp to cover the entire infield — a positive sign, to be sure, that the delay would be short. I spent the delay trying to thaw out in the Hank Sauer Room, a private party room in the right field corner that I’d never previously entered. The Chiefs were gracious enough to open the room for fans looking for some relief from the cold, and there were a handful of fans hanging out in there for some warmth. After the delay, I went back out to the concourse and any warmth that I’d enjoyed in the party room was quickly gone. The temperature was still in the 30s, but the fact that I’d been outside for several hours had finally caught up to me. Although I was wearing warm gloves whenever I could, my hands were bare when I was updating Twitter and taking photos. In fact, my hands got cold enough that typing quickly and accurately were a challenge.

The hot chocolate may have warmed me a little, but I was still freezing when I went out to the party deck at the top of the sixth inning. Luplow, the second batter, blasted a pitch that sailed just a few yards to my left. Off the bat, it looked very much as though it would be a home run, but it ended up hitting the fence a foot or two from the top and caroming back past De Aza. Luplow had himself a triple, De Aza had flurries in his eyes and I just missed out on getting a home run ball. Here’s a shot that I took just before Luplow’s hit; you’ll notice the flurries in the air:

I figured that was as close as I’d come to a home run ball, so I went back down the concourse and watched a half-inning from behind home plate, pressing my body up against one of the pillars in an attempt to keep out of a wind a bit. For the seventh inning, I once again retreated to the shelter of the Hank Sauer Room, where this was the view:

When the first game of the doubleheader wrapped up, I was anticipating waiting 30 or so minutes for the second game to begin — and I planned to stay in the warm spot that I currently occupied for the entirety of the break. Just a few minutes later, however, a staff member arrived to tell me that management had opted to postpone the second game, as the weather was getting colder and the flurries were once again picking up. There was already a 10:30 a.m. game scheduled for the following day, so the postponed game would be tacked onto the end of that game to make another doubleheader. That suited me just fine, but instead of heading straight for the gates, I had one mission to fulfill.

Earlier in the game, I’d seen Indians outfielder Austin Meadows, the top-ranked prospect in Pittsburgh’s system, hit a foul ball into the seats in front of one of the suites on the third base side. I hadn’t seen anyone retrieve it, but I also didn’t want to go into this area if there were people in the suite. As the fans filed out of the stadium, I went up to the upper deck and quickly found the ball:

Afterward, I just stood for a few minutes to enjoy the snowy scene in front of me. I knew that it’ll likely be a long time before I’m at another snow game, so I couldn’t resist just marveling at the unique nature of this day. Here’s how the field looked after the game:

The flurries were still coming down hard when I left NBT Bank Stadium, prompting me to take this shot …

… and I couldn’t resist grabbing this one, too:

Next, I hopped into my car, put the defroster/heater on high, and shivered for a few minutes while the windows defogged. Then, I pulled out of the parking lot and headed toward my hotel. A quick glimpse of the stadium over my shoulder prompted me to pull over and get out to shoot the following photo from afar. Funny enough, the flurries weren’t coming down quite as hard at this moment, and the scene looked peaceful. When I travel to Syracuse for baseball, I always get a thrill turning left off NBT Bank Parkway onto Tex Simone Drive and seeing NBT Bank Stadium through my windshield, and seeing it now with snow on the ground was definitely a scene that I’ll remember for a long time:

As soon as I snapped that photo, I got back into my car and was back to my hotel less than five minutes later. For this trip, I was staying at the Embassy Suites by Hilton Syracuse Destiny USA:

It’s one of the city’s newest hotels and gets its name from being across the street from Destiny USA, the sixth-largest mall in the U.S. A day earlier, when the Chiefs game was rained out, I walked around this expansive mall for about and hour and grabbed some dinner that I took back to the hotel. I did the same on this night, after thawing out for a bit, and ended up visiting the mall four or five separate times during my stay. If you’re headed to Syracuse for a Chiefs game, I can’t recommend this hotel enough. If you’re a big shopper, there’s no better hotel in the city. Or, perhaps you’re a baseball fan and your spouse isn’t — you can head to the game and she could head to the mall.

Another cool point for baseball fans — this hotel is the official hotel of the Chiefs, which means that the visiting team stays there. I picked up on this fact pretty quickly upon my arrival when I saw staff members in Indians gear and players walking around the hotel lobby with Pirates apparel on. Here’s a look at the lobby:

I always get a thrill out of staying at the same hotel as ballplayers, even if I don’t have any interactions with them, and I’m forever scouting out people and trying to assess whether they’re players or not.

My snowy day at the ballpark was certainly memorable, even if I was uncomfortably cold for most of it. The cold didn’t deter me from heading back bright and early the following morning for a doubleheader, albeit one without fluffy white flakes.

Minnesota Twins – September 17, 2017

Going into my third visit to Target Field, my mission was twofold — I wanted to make sure to document any sights that I’d perhaps missed on my two previous visits, and to simply chill out for a few innings and enjoy watching some baseball at this gorgeous ballpark.

A pretty good to-do list, right?

This was a Sunday game with an early start time, which meant that I’d have an even earlier arrival time at Target Field. For 7 p.m. games, I find that I have a habit of repeatedly looking at the clock and wanting the day to fly by faster so that I can get to the ballpark. For afternoon games, however, it’s exciting to basically get up, get ready, and head to the ballpark. I left my hotel a little after 9 a.m. and made the short walk over to Target Field. Before going in, I wanted to spend some time enjoying the sights outside the park. The sightseeing began once again in Twins Plaza, where I took in the selection of statues in the area. If you read about my first visit to Target Field, you might recall seeing the Kirby Puckett statue. He’s just one of several former Twins stars honored in this fashion. Another statue depicts the late Harmon Killebrew, a hall of famer and member of the 500 home run club:

Another notable statue that you’ll definitely want to check out upon visiting Target Field is that of HOFer and 18-time all-star Rod Carew, which you’ll find just a short walk from Twins Plaza, over in front of the Majestic Clubhouse Store:

I next took a couple long laps around Target Field, pausing to snap this shot of a Metro Blue Line train on its way to Target Field station:

About 10 a.m., I went inside the park and hung out in the outfield seats, taking in the quiet ballpark in front of me on a breezy, sunny and perfect fall day. It’s moments like this in which I feel a deep sense of appreciation for being able to travel to so many different cities to watch baseball — and also a deep sense of appreciation for everyone who takes time out of their busy days to read about my ongoing adventures.

After the gates opened, I went down to the seats on the third base side. The Twins were warming up along the first base line, and while a lot of fans were scrambling to the front row to get autographs, I was content to hang back and, once again, just enjoy the scene from this sunny spot:

My next stop, the seats in right-center, weren’t sunny at all. This area was fully in the shade, and the autumn breeze made where I stood downright chilly. I snapped this panorama …

… and then headed back to a sunny area where the conditions were a little more pleasant. After watching the Twins warm up for a bit longer, I went over to the third base side to watch the Blue Jays do the same. I was neat seeing the sizable contingent of Jays fans taking in the three games I attended. As I scanned the crowd, it felt as though there was a 50/50 split in people wearing Twins gear versus Jays gear, and the throng of fans was always thick around the visitors dugout before the games. Case in point — here’s relief pitcher Danny Barnes signing some autographs, and just look at all the blue apparel around him:

As first pitch approached, I went back to the outfield seats and watched a parade of families walking along the warning track. Instead of a wide-angle shot of the field, here’s how the scene looked as I turned to my right to watch the parade “highlights” on the video board:

Once the parade wrapped up, I took this shot toward home plate that clearly shows all the different levels of seating in the area:

Something that Target Field does really well is break its seating into smaller sections. This is common at lots of MLB parks, of course, but I really like how this ballpark does it. I don’t need to break down each of the sections, but I particularly like the yellow seats in the middle of the image. I visited this section a handful of times throughout my three games at Target Field, and I appreciated how close they were to the action, but also how much of a bird’s-eye view of the field they gave you. Accomplishing this balance can be tricky — sometimes, you’re too close to appreciate the whole field and, other times, you’re too far away to see the game’s small details — but these seats, which are technically part of the Delta SKY360 Club, are outstanding.

With a bit more time to go before first pitch, I walked over to the plaza inside Gate 34 and watched a bit of the Twins pregame show on the local Fox Sports affiliate:

And then, just in time for first pitch, I grabbed a seat above the third base line, which gave me not only a perfect view of the field …

… but also a nice view of the city’s skyline beyond right-center. I have to also admit that I chose this area partly because I expected that it might be a good spot to snag a foul ball — and, while a few fouls did indeed come up to this level, they were all a couple sections away from me.

About an inning into the game, I was on the move again. This time, I took a spot in the upper deck in the left field corner, where I watched an inning of action:

Next, I set off in search of something to eat. While highly tempted to get another order of the seafood boil, a fantastic dish that I’d enjoyed a day earlier, I wanted to branch out and find something different. Choosing what to eat during the last game at a particular ballpark can be a bit stressful. (And, yes, I realize this is a colossal first-world problem.) I always want to get something that appeals to me, but there are normally a handful of items that fit this bill — meaning that I’ve got to make the right choice. A dish that had caught my eye a few times was the walleye and chips. It seems funny now, but the use of “walleye” really drew me in. Had the menu simply read “fish and chips,” there’s a 100 percent chance that I wouldn’t have ordered this dish. The inclusion of walleye, which is the state fish of Minnesota, made the meal seem a lot more regionally appealing — and it was enough for me to take the bait, so to speak.

I grabbed my order, took it back to a seat not far from where I’d sat for the first inning, and dug in:

The meal was good, but basically tasted like any average fish and chips I’ve ever eaten. The inclusion of the walleye instead of a saltwater fish such as cod or haddock might have been geographically appropriate, but I certainly wasn’t able to taste anything different about it.

I ended up spending the bulk of the second half of the game in this spot. While I usually enjoy wandering around and taking in all the sights, it’s also fun to grab a good seat and just enjoy watching the game. As the game wound to a close, and my third visit to Target Field ended with it, it wasn’t time to fly home just yet. Instead, I’d be spending the final day of my Minneapolis visit getting a chance to tour three of the city’s notable sports venues.

First, though, I was looking forward to spending a quiet evening relaxing in my hotel, the Embassy Suites by Hilton Minneapolis Downtown. This is definitely the hotel that I’ll be booking whenever I visit the Twin Cities again. In addition to its proximity to Target Field, the rooms were absolutely outstanding and among the largest and most impressive I’ve ever stayed in. I wholeheartedly recommend it to baseball travelers planning to see the Twins. I normally only post my own photos on my blog, but the shots that I took in my room pale in comparison to the hotel’s official images, so I can’t resist sharing the latter. Here’s a shot that shows the living room part of the suite …

… and here’s one that shows the bedroom:

After relaxing (and watching some football on that ginormous TV for a bit) I grabbed a sub from Jimmy John’s, which I could see out my window, and then returned to my room to eat, watch Sunday Night Baseball, and then head to bed in excitement of the next day’s adventures.

Minnesota Twins – September 16, 2017

I’m an early riser at home, and that holds true on my baseball trips, too. The way I see it, there’s very little point in lying in bed when I’m in a new city filled with interesting things to see and do.

All that to say, I was up good and early on my second day in Minneapolis and eager to get things started. I decided to begin my day with a walk around the city’s downtown. One of my favorite things about Minneapolis is that you can get virtually anywhere downtown on foot, all without going outside. Nothing against fresh air of course, but the Minneapolis Skyway System quickly became a hit for me. It’s a network of enclosed pedestrian bridges and walkways that link up the buildings over 80 (!!) city blocks. It’s the biggest system of its kind in the world, and I found it exceedingly handy and exciting to use.

I took one of the bridges that connected to the second floor of my hotel, the Embassy Suites by Hilton Minneapolis Downtown, and from it, I could see my hotel on the right and Target Field in the distance. And that’s the Mayo Clinic on the left:

After walking for about 45 minutes, all without going outside, I made my way back to my hotel and had breakfast. One of the things that I really like about the Embassy Suites brand is that breakfast is included with your stay, and it’s outstanding. Each of the four days of my stay, I had ready-made omelets for breakfast, among other things, to ensure that I’d be properly fueled for my adventure.

Speaking of adventure, after relaxing in my hotel room for a bit, I headed off to Target Field. A day earlier, I’d gone straight into the ballpark instead of doing my usual walk around its exterior, so that was atop my to-do list on this day. Check out this panorama that shows just how gorgeous this ballpark is:

There’s a lot going on in this photo. Starting at the far left, you’ll see a parking structure that is connected to the ballpark with one of the Minneapolis Skyway System’s bridges. Below that is North 7th Street, which runs roughly parallel to the first base line. On this side of the bridge is the team shop; despite the size of it, it’s just one level — but the tall ceilings give it a really roomy feel. Next is Gate 29, followed by one of the ticket offices. And, of course, you’ve also got the famous baseball statue. It’s difficult to tell in the above panorama, but the curved markings on the ground make up an enormous Target logo. (There are actually a handful of them on the ground around Target Field.)

Next, I walked around to the corner of North 5th Street and North 3rd Avenue, which is where you’ll find Gate 3:

This is a popular gate for the fans who arrive via light rail, and there are a lot of them. Up the hill on the right side of the above image is Target Field Station, one of the stops on Minneapolis’ light rail system. If you’ve read my post about the first day of my visit, you’ll recall that I was thoroughly impressed with how easy it was to get around the city via light rail, and that I’d taken it from the airport terminal to within a block of my hotel. Target Field Station is where the Metro Blue Line ends, and I think it’s outstanding that you can so easily get to the ballpark in this manner.

Because I’m apparently on a roll with panoramas, here’s another one. It’s similar to the first one that you saw, but taken from farther back:

I like how it turned out, and I also like that the dark clouds soon went away and didn’t interfere with the ballgame!

My last stop before entering the park was Twins Plaza outside Gate 34, which I’d enjoyed checking out a day earlier. In addition to the Kirby Puckett statue, which I grabbed a photo with, you’ll likely recognize the statue called The Golden Glove. It was added in 2010 and recognizes the Twins’ Gold Glove winners. Lots of great names are honored on a plaque next to the glove — Puckett, Jim Kaat, Gary Gaetti, Tony Oliva, Torii Hunter and Joe Mauer, among others.

Even more enticing than the plaque is the glove itself, which is cupped to make it one of the coolest seats in all of baseball. Before games, there’s a lineup of fans waiting to sit on it and have their pictures taken, but I was early enough that no one was around — and that meant I had the glove to myself:

Want one more panorama before we head into the ballpark? Yes? I’m glad to hear it.

Here’s a look at Twins Plaza with Gate 34 in the background — and you can see the glove roughly in the middle of the picture:

Apparently, I was panorama-happy on my second day in Minneapolis, because after getting into Target Field and walking to the concourse behind home plate, I snapped this shot:

The Twins have one darned impressive-looking ballpark, don’t they?

As you can see, batting practice hadn’t yet begun, so I went straight down to field level on the third base side. A day earlier, I’d watched the Blue Jays playing catch, and now I was interested in seeing the Twins. As I made my way down the front row of seats toward the outfield, I saw a baseball that someone have evidently airmailed into the stands, and decided to take an artsy shot of it. I call this one “Baseball on Concrete With Sunflower Seed Shell in Background.”

I didn’t have any noteworthy interactions with the Twins, but I did get to stand behind one of my all-time favorite players, Joe Mauer, and watch him play catch for several minutes …

… before moving toward the infield to watch him field ground balls at first base:

I also had a close-up encounter with ageless wonder Bartolo Colón, who holds distinction for many things, including being the last remaining player from the Montréal Expos to be playing in the big leagues:

After watching the Twins for a while longer, I went over to the visitors dugout for the first time since a day earlier, where I watched a bunch of the Jays get loose.

I also noticed Hazel Mae, the on-field reporter for Toronto’s TV broadcasts on Sportsnet, signing some autographs for fans — including this very happy young man:

I’ve included this mention of Mae because it wasn’t long before she was making Twitter headlines. Later in the game, she was hit in the ankle with a Kevin Pillar foul ball and had to go get some first aid. (A day later, she was back on the field with a crutch.)

During my first game at Target Field’s I’d gazed way up to the Budweiser Roof Deck in the left field corner and pledged that I’d check it out at some point. Now seemed as good a time as any, so I headed toward the left field corner, rode an elevator all the way to the roof deck, and soon had this bird’s eye view of the stadium:

The roof deck, like many of its kind, is reserved for group/private functions. The one booked for this game hadn’t yet begun, but there were several stadium staffers busily getting the area prepared. In addition to multiple levels of stadium seating, the rood deck also had couches, bistro tables and an enormous bar, some of which you can see here:

Upon departing the roof deck, I went back down to the main concourse and made my way over to the first base side, where I snapped the following photo that I want to use to illustrate some of Target Field’s seating situation:

One of the things that really struck me about this ballpark was just how many different spots there were for fans to hang out and watch the game. The above image is looking in just a single direction, of course, but check out how many places there are for fans. The main spot in this image is the upper deck in right-center, and I love how it’s asymmetrical in design. I spent some time in this area during each game I attended, and really enjoyed the view. You’ve got a smaller, more intimate seating section directly below that deck, as well as standing room behind it. Moving toward center field, there’s the ultra-popular Minnie and Paul’s, a pub-style area that you can see directly below the Target Field sign. It’s got tables and chairs and standing-room spots, and is open to all fans. Directly below it is a premium seating area called Catch, which is limited to just 120 seats and includes high-end food with your ticket. And these are just the spots in a single photograph. It seemed as though whatever direction I looked, there were many different spots for fans.

My next stop was the top row of the upper deck on the third base side, where I was anxious to not only see the ballpark from this vantage point, but to also turn my back to the field and check out Target Field Station. As I mentioned in my last post, I took Minneapolis’ light rail around the city extensively during my visit, and while I walked to Target Field instead of traveled to it via light rail, I remain thoroughly impressed with the ease of getting around — and getting to the ballpark — in this city. Here’s a look at Target Field Station from inside the ballpark, and I think you’ll agree that it looks sharp:

In the above image, the video board was showing an advertisement, but was otherwise airing the Twins pregame show, which I thought was a cool touch for fans to see as they got off the train and proceeded toward the gates.

Because I was already in the upper deck, I decided to walk all the way around to behind home plate, where I paused to take in this spectacular view:

All the sightseeing — or was it simply the fact that I’d been keeping my eye on the various concession stand menus as I toured around — had worked up my appetite, so I soon decided that something to eat would be a good idea. Although there were many things that intrigued me, I quickly made my mind up about what I’d be eating. I present to you the shrimp boil:

Shrimp boils aren’t exactly popular where I live in Canada, but I’ve seen them enough online that I’ve always wanted to try one. So, when I scouted out this item on the Target Field menu, I knew that I had to eat it at some point during my visit. At $14.50, this meal wasn’t cheap, but it also wasn’t small. It contained a hefty serving of shrimp, spicy sausage, corn on the cob segments and red potatoes, all tossed with creole seasoning. The verdict, I’m pleased to say, was freakin’ awesome. The variety of tastes and textures, all coated with the spicy seasoning, made this dish a real winner, and one that I had to fight the urge not to order a day later. In fact, it left such an impression on me that when I helped to put together the list for USA Today’s Best Stadium Food competition a couple months ago, I included it as one of the choices.

After eating, I went to check out the Delta Sky360 Club, which is situated at the concourse level behind home plate. It’s got a ton of concession stands, bar-style seating and, most importantly, allows you to walk through the history of the Twins by showcasing dozens of interesting artifacts. This is how the area looks in panoramic form:

See the display cases? Here are some closeups:

I spent a considerable amount of time browsing the hall of fame-worthy collection, which paid tribute to not only the top players and best moments from throughout the history of the franchise, but also to other key moments in Target Field’s history, including the various big concerts that the stadium has hosted over the years.

I ended up watching a couple innings of the action from the seats inside the Delta Sky360 Club, taking advantage of each break between innings to walk over to the artifact displays and browse them for a couple minutes. As the game progressed and night fell, I went back out to the concourse, took a lap of the stadium, and then went outside to snap some shots of it from the exterior. Here’s one in particular that I like:

Soon enough, I was back inside the stadium and looking for a spot to sit for the remainder of the game. I found it in the top row of the upper deck in right center, where I had this view:

Just like a day earlier, I headed out of Target Field immediately after the final out and was back in my hotel room just a few minutes later, eagerly anticipating the Twins day game that I’d be attending about 12 hours later.

Minnesota Twins – September 15, 2017

Since I first saw it on TV back in 2010, I’ve considered Target Field to be one of the best-looking ballparks in baseball. Of course, it’s difficult to authoritatively make that call without a thorough fact-finding mission, right?

Time to make that happen.

Midway through last summer, I decided that I wanted to take another September baseball trip. I’d done it a year earlier, spending three days at Coors Field in Denver, and the idea of fall baseball once again beckoned. This time, I set my sights on the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-Saint Paul for a trio of Twins games on September 15 through 17, plus an awesome day of sightseeing planned for September 18.

The morning of September 15 began early, as the first days of my trips frequently do. I was up about 3:30 a.m. for an early-morning flight to Toronto, fanny pack at the ready as always. I landed about 6:30 a.m. and snapped this shot of my plane midway through my two-hour layover:

Soon enough, I was back in the air and on the way to Minneapolis, where I touched down just before 10 a.m. — gaining an hour because of the time zone difference.

I was fortunate to get a hotel just a few blocks from Target Field, but the fact that the Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport is about 15 miles outside of the downtown area compelled me to plan to rent a car for my visit. Fortunately, the good people at Meet Minneapolis, who were super helpful with my trip planning, talked me out of doing so — they stressed that Minneapolis is extremely public transit friendly, and assured me that I’d be better off getting from the airport to downtown on the city’s light rail system. I’m pretty much a public transit novice. Growing up in a rural area meant that I drove everywhere, and it wasn’t until I was in university that I set foot on my first subway. In fact, I’m midway through my 30s and have still never taken a city bus. All this to say that I was a little tentative about getting around the city via light rail, but I was up to the challenge. It turns out, it wasn’t a challenge at all — Minneapolis’ light rail system was an absolutely breeze to navigate, and I used it several times during my visit.

Several minutes after stepping off my flight and into the airport terminal, I’d found my way down to the light rail station below the airport:

A few minutes later, I was comfortably seated on a Metro Blue Line light rail car and on my way downtown. The ride, which took about half an hour, was really pleasant. I love driving through new cities, but you don’t really get a full appreciation for the sights when you’re carefully watching the GPS screen as much as you’re looking through the windshield. On the train, with my route map in hand, I could take in all of the sights and get a real feel for the different parts of the city. One highlight that was impossible to miss was the enormous U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the NFL’s Vikings and the host stadium of Super Bowl LII. Seeing it, however briefly, was a pleasant tease — I’d be getting a private tour of it on the last day of my visit to Minneapolis!

I hopped off my train at the Warehouse District/Hennepin Avenue station and had about a block to walk to get to my hotel — can’t get much better than that. I arrived at the Embassy Suites by Hilton Minneapolis Downtown shortly before 11 a.m., fully expecting that I’d have to hang out in the lobby and scroll through Twitter for a couple hours, given that I’d arrived well in advance of the hotel’s 4 p.m. check-in time. I’ve learned over the course of my many travels, however, that it’s never a bad idea to let the front desk know that you’ve arrived, even if check-in isn’t for a few hours. I did, and was delighted to learn that my room was ready for me — welcome news after so much traveling. I quickly checked in, grabbed a burger from a restaurant a block or so away, and then headed to a nearby Target to pick up some snacks for my trip.

As I proceeded toward the checkout, I caught a familiar-looking person out of the corner of my eye. Longtime MLB veteran and 1992 World Series winner Pat Tabler, now a color commentator for Toronto’s TV broadcasts on Rogers Sportsnet, headed past me while walking toward the rear of the store. This is a guy I grew up watching, and now see on Jays broadcasts, so I couldn’t resist chasing him down. Lugging my overloaded shopping basket, I caught up to him a moment later and asked if I could take a picture with him:

We talked for a minute or two afterward; I told him that I was from Ontario and grew up watching him, and he told me that made him feel old. He also jokingly chastised me for busting him in the cookie aisle. “Not to worry,” I told him, “I was in the same aisle a few minutes ago, too.”

Highly content with how my visit to Minneapolis had been so far, I walked back to my hotel, unpacked my shopping bags, and relaxed in my room until it was time to make the short walk over to Target Field. I got there just after 3 p.m., which is pretty darned early for a 7 p.m. game, you might think. The Twins were hooking me up with media credentials for all three games, though, which meant that I could get in well before the gates opened — and if you know me, you know I was more than a little excited by this prospect.

I arrived at Target Field through what’s known as Twins Plaza outside Gate 34, which is the gate that you frequently see on TV broadcasts. I was immediately impressed with the look of the entire area. I was early enough that it was still pretty quiet, and that suited me just fine because I could take this photo that shows the scene without a throng of people:

Twins Plaza is definitely a place that you want to visit when you go to Target Field. It’s notable for being home to several statues, including the famous one that depicts hall of famer Kirby Puckett rounding the bases and pumping his fist after hitting his iconic home run in the 1991 World Series. Of course, I had to get a photo in front of it:

Normally, I take at least one lap around the outside of every ballpark I visit, so that would’ve come next. Knowing that I had three days to thoroughly take in all the sights in and outside of Target Field, I decided to put the perimeter tour on hold until a day later so that I could get inside as quickly as possible. I entered via the press entrance, which put me in the open concourse close to where you’d be upon walking through Gate 34. I immediately rushed to the front row of the right field seats to take a look at the field for the first time, and was amused to see the players playing catch with a football — a sure sign of autumn, I guess:

Next, I wandered over to right-center to take this panorama, which shows just how beautiful Target Field truly is:

When I get inside a ballpark for the first time, there’s a temptation to run helter-skelter around and try to take in all the sights at once. It can be tough to tell myself, “OK, you’ve got three days here. Take a nice, slow lap around the concourse for starters to get your bearings.” Fortunately, that little voice in my head won out, so I continued wandering through the outfield seats and all the way past the left field foul pole, where I stopped to snap this picture of myself:

(As you might’ve noticed, I’m wearing one of my custom T-shirts. Want your own? Click here.)

See the players on the field behind me? The Jays pitchers were playing catch, and I watched them from this vantage point for a moment before heading down to field level. You might be wondering about me seeing Toronto on the road: Even though the Jays are my favorite team, seeing them on this trip was pure luck — I only had a couple scheduling opportunities for visiting Minneapolis in September, and the Jays were in town for one of them. Couldn’t pass up that chance. For all the times that I’ve seen Toronto in action, this was only the second series that I’d seen them on the road, funny enough.

Down at field level, I found a spot behind third base, where I simply hung out and enjoyed the scene. It was fun, as always, to watch the players up close, but my attention was more drawn to the beautiful ballpark landscape around me:

Soon enough, the enormous video board began to show different clips and information. At one point, there was live footage of the field. I quickly snapped the following photo because I could see myself (or, more aptly, the few pixels that I knew were me) and I thought it would be fun to share:

As I stood there, players and staff passed back and forth in front of me, going to and from the dugout. Longtime trainer George Poulis, who has since become the head trainer for the Braves, said hello to me as he walked past, while reliever Danny Barnes, who I met way back in 2011 when he was with the Lansing Lugnuts, nodded as he passed me. One player I was keeping my eye (and camera) on was closer Roberto Osuna, and I’m glad that I did. Just a moment after I took this photo …

… he finished playing catch. Instead of carrying his warmup ball to the dugout with him or tossing it into the ball bag, he turned and fired it all the way into the upper deck — like it was no big deal, I might add. I don’t know if he was aiming for this opening — I suspect he was — but his throw sailed through the opening to Section 329, which you’ll see at the bottom left of the deck:

As I watched the ball disappear, I thought, “That’ll make a cool souvenir for someone,” and then thought, “Hey, what about me?” Being at the edge of the infield, I was extremely far away from the upper deck, of course. Getting there would require running back up to the concourse, along the concourse to the foul pole, and up several flights of stairs — and then hoping that a staff member hadn’t scooped up the ball. If you know me, though, you know that I’m always up for a baseball challenge, so I took off in the direction of where I hoped the ball would be.

And found nothing.

I searched, searched, and searched some more, and the ball wasn’t anywhere. There were a couple concessions employees preparing their stand nearby, so I figured that one of them had grabbed it. I figured that at least I got a little exercise out of the quest, and turned to head back down the stairs toward the concourse. Midway down, I stopped and thought about the situation. I couldn’t imagine concession staff caring about errant baseballs, so I figured the ball still had to be there. I ran back up, searched for a few more minutes — including getting down on my hands and knees, and came up with this gem:

I have to admit that I was pretty satisfied with myself as I retraced my steps back down the stairs, along the concourse, and back down to field level. I might’ve even been grinning like a fool.

There were still a few Jays leaving the field when I returned, and I happily stood there and snapped pictures of several of them. Most ignored me, but starter/reliever Joe Biagini looked right at me as I was taking his picture …

… and asked, “How do I look? Good?” I told him that he indeed did look good, and he nodded and continued to the dugout.

As the Jays left the field, the Twins made their way toward home plate to take batting practice. I snapped this shot from a spot above the visitors dugout …

… and then just stood there and watched the action. When the gates opened, I went back to left field to try to snag a home run ball. The lower deck had a moderate number of people trying to snag baseballs, so I went all the way back to the upper deck, where there were just a couple other fans. Of course, upper deck shots are relatively rare, even in BP, but I figured that I’d hang out in this spot for a few minutes to see if anything came my way. It wasn’t long before someone on the Twins — I’m not sure who, unfortunately — blasted a moonshot that landed a few rows in front of me, and I had no trouble dashing down and grabbing it:

I’m always happy to snag a ball during BP, so I dropped the ball in my backpack and headed off to further explore Target Field. My first stop was the press box (no photos there — sorry) to pick up some lineup sheets. I saw Tabler again, and nearly collided with his TV broadcast partner and longtime MLBer Buck Martinez, who hurried out of the broadcast booth and almost walked straight into me. I also saw Twins legend and HOFer Bert Blyleven, who did not circle me.

Speaking of circles, I headed straight for the iconic “Welcome to Target Field” sign below the press box next. Target Field’s press box location is unique in the big leagues. Instead of being on the suite level, it’s immediately above the 200 Level, and there’s a cross-aisle directly below it. One of my pre-visit goals was to get a picture of myself with the Target logo on the wall below the press box, and here’s that effort:

I stood with my back to the Target sign for a few minutes to enjoy the view. From that spot, I could hear the broadcasters in their various booths talking, which provided a nice soundtrack as I took in the perfect scene in front of me:

As I posted on Instagram later on my visit, Pittsburgh’s PNC Park often has a much-deserved reputation as offering the best view from home plate in the majors, but I think that the view at Target Field is certainly no slouch. What do you think?

Next, I went back to the concourse and began a slow walk to take in the sights. Remember the Puckett statue from outside Gate 34 recognizing his game six home run? Well, on the concourse, there was a display featuring the seat in which the home run ball landed:

Returning to the outfield seats at the end of my walk through the concourse, I enjoyed this cool view of the Budweiser Roof Deck above the left field foul pole:

I love how you can see the top of the Ford Center and its water tower just beyond the roof deck. Today, the building provides office space, but it was once one of the locations where Model T Fords were assembled.

As the time ticked down toward first pitch, I spent a few minutes standing in a variety of spots to enjoy the view and atmosphere at the ballpark — high above the field in the seats in right-center, in the area inside Gate 34 and down toward field level in the right field corner, to name a few. Just before first pitch, I grabbed some food and took a seat in the upper deck in left-center. What did I eat, you might ask? Well, I’ll be glad to tell you.

I present to you deep-fried, beer-battered cheese curds:

They were pretty darned good. I’d have liked them to be a little more gooey — the cheese basically still held its shape as I bit into them — but I was glad to add another unique type of ballpark fare to my ever-expanding repertoire.

After eating, I headed to the team shop for the first time, and was immediately blown away by its size and some of its unique features. Case in point, this Twins suit, which could be yours for the low-low price of $740:

Later in the game, I took a seat in the upper deck in right field, stopping to snap this panorama of the area inside Gate 34:

I watched a couple innings of the game from that spot, in part because the view of the field was perfect, and in part because I needed to get off my feet. I hadn’t sat for four or five hours by that point, and was ready to give my feet a little break.

Midway through the game, I grabbed a spot here, where I enjoyed this outstanding view:

I spent the game’s latter innings watching the action from several spots, while also enjoying a few more laps around the concourse to take in all the sights. As soon as the ninth inning drew to a close, I made the short walk back to my hotel, majorly in need of sleep after such a long day:

I crashed pretty soon after getting back to my room, pumped to have finally made it to Minneapolis and excited for the next day’s visit to beautiful Target Field.

Hartford Yard Goats – August 29

The fact that I’d driven about eight hours a day earlier to get to Hartford meant that by the time I’d parked a block away from Dunkin’ Donuts Park, it was time to hustle inside and check out the newest ballpark in the Eastern League.

On my second day in Hartford, however, I had just a 10-minute drive to the ballpark from my hotel — giving me plenty of time to arrive early and check out the surrounding area. As I mentioned in my previous blog post, there are several parking lots around Dunkin’ Donuts Park. That meant that the surrounding area wasn’t exactly thrilling, although I’m optimistic that more things to see and do will be built up in the years ahead. Still, there were a few things that I was eager to explore, starting with a small park area behind the batter’s eye:

There were still several hours before first pitch, which meant that the streets around the ballpark were pretty quiet, as you can see here:

A lap around Dunkin’ Donuts Park proved to be fun, but pretty uneventful. My favorite part was snapping some photographs and panoramas across the street from the ballpark’s front gate, and trying not to get squashed by a car in the process. Here’s one panorama that I particularly like:

As you might have noticed if you looked closely, the traffic light had already turned green by the time I took the above shot, so I had to dart back to the safety of the curb.

Given that there wasn’t much else to see outside, I went inside to begin my second visit to Dunkin’ Donuts Park. As I had a day before, I used the admin entrance, which put me in the concourse behind home plate. I’m sharing the following photo not only to show how the park looked as soon as I got inside, but also to show the impressive video board and the enormous Dunkin’ Donuts coffee cup atop it — two very cool features of this ballpark:

At the moment, the visiting Portland Sea Dogs were on the field but weren’t yet hitting. I decided to spend a few minutes down at field level on the third base side, where I snapped this panorama …

… and then hung out in this cool spot once batting practice began:

If you look at this next photo, I was standing roughly behind the first “B” in “BBQ” for the start of batting practice, and it proved to be one of the more unique spots I’ve found to watch BP:

No balls came directly my way, but there were lots that were clanking off the seats below me — and from where I stood, I could even see some of them with my camera’s zoom lens:

Although I was enjoying just hanging out and watching BP, I was also eager to continue to explore the ballpark. After a few minutes of standing still, I was once again on the move. My first stop was behind the visitor’s bullpen in left field, where I watched BP for a minute or two with this view:

Then, I headed to close straightaway center, which offered this view:

My next stop was the deck high above the right field corner:

I spent the rest of BP taking in the action from a handful of different spots, and as the gates were set to open, went down to the main concourse to begin my quest for something to eat. First, I noticed a cool “eat local” initiative sponsored by Connecticut farmers — there were several bushels of apples and peaches, and they looked delicious:

Admittedly, I didn’t take any of the fruit, although something that wasn’t deep-fried would’ve probably done me some good, especially given what I’d eaten a day before — and, let’s be honest, what I would soon be eating.

Before I found my dinner and shortly before the gates opened, I had a chance to go down to the Dugout Suite section that I marveled at a day earlier, but that I hadn’t actually gone down to see up close. This spot looked cool from afar, but I have to admit that I was downright giddy when I got next to it and realized just how awesome this spot would be to sit for a game:

Imagine a whole nine innings in one of these seats with the warning track just a few feet away and, more importantly, the dugout immediately beside you? If you’re the type of fan who dreams of being a fly on the wall of a professional dugout during a game, this is about as close as you’re going to get. Dunkin’ Donuts Park is the 52nd different Minor League Baseball facility that I’ve visited, and I have to say that the Dugout Suite seats are right up at the top of my list of coolest/most unique seating sections in the minors.

As I did a day earlier, I set my sights on finding food right after the gates opened, with the idea that the food would be fresh and the lineups wouldn’t be too long. There were a lot of interesting items that I was curious to try, but I wanted to again go with a dish that was unique and that tied into the company for which the park is named — and that came in the form of something called Dunkin’ & Chicken Skewers:

You’re looking at six boneless BBQ wings and six Dunkin’ Donuts Munchkins, placed onto a pair of wooden skewers. This meal was definitely, uh, filling, as you might have guessed from the photo. Actually, it was pretty tasty, although I found the BBQ sauce to be a little sweet — and when it combined with the sweetness of the Munchkins, it was a bit of sugar overload. I’d have preferred a spicier sauce on the boneless wings to provide a little more contrast, and I think staggering them on the skewers would’ve worked better, too. Still, it was tasty and unique, and that’s what I’m always going for at the ballpark.

My dinner was filling, but not so much that I had to get some post-eating recovery, so as soon as I wiped my mouth after swallowing the last bite, I was on the move again.

After another quick lap of the concourse, I returned to the visitor’s dugout area in time to see Matt Barnes warming up. He was pitching for the Sea Dogs in a rehab start, which always draws a big crowd of fans — but, the fact that he’s a Connecticut native and went to the University of Connecticut meant that there was a sizable contingent of fans there to see him. You don’t normally see a pitcher conversing with fans before a start, but Barnes took a few minutes to chat with a couple of people he obviously knew before beginning to toss. And I was close enough that I could eavesdrop get pictures like this one:

When he did finally toe the bullpen rubber, I moved over to get a better look:

Barnes ended up pitching just one inning in his rehab effort , and it interestingly ended up being the only inning he pitched in the minors all season. I guess his need for some rehab time was pretty minimal.

I watched the national anthem and the top of the first inning from this cool vantage point just to the left field side of straightaway center:

This next part is a little out of sequence, so bear with me. Before I left the bullpen area after watching Barnes warming up, I ended up finding a baseball that was sitting below one of the seats. I’m guessing that it had been there since batting practice, but I’m absolutely shocked that no one had noticed it because the gates had been open for an hour and, as I said, the area around the visitor’s bullpen was very crowded. For whatever reason, I neglected to photograph the ball immediately upon picking it up, and didn’t remember to do so until a couple innings into the game, when I’d taken a bar-style seat in right-center. So, that said, here’s the ball:

I watched the first inning from the above spot, meandered around for about another inning or two, and then took one of the seats behind home plate for a bit:

I spent the remainder of the game as I often do in the later innings of my second day in a given city — watching the game from different vantage points and just generally enjoying being at the ballpark. By this point, I’ve often put my camera away and am just enjoying being a fan, and that was the case during this part of the evening, too.

After the game, I exited via the main gates and crossed the street so that I could snap my last look at Dunkin’ Donuts Park:

By the way, how fun is the “No Goats, No Glory” slogan on the sign above the team shop?

I was happy once again to have just a short drive back to my hotel, the Hyatt House Hartford North/Windsor. And, like a day earlier, my post-game evening basically consisted of lounging in the living room of my suite-style room, watching some baseball for a bit, and then heading to bed. The next morning, with another eight-hour drive on the agenda, I took a bit of time to walk around the area with the intention of getting a bit of exercise before sitting for the bulk of the day. I included a few laps of the hotel grounds on my walk, and was intrigued to notice this cool patio area outside the swimming pool. It wasn’t occupied at this early hour, but I can see it being a popular spot for guests — especially with the barbecue available for guests, too:

After my walk, I went back up to my room, packed things up, and then sat and ate some breakfast on the couch while I watched the morning SportsCenter. Speaking of food, I wanted to share this picture of the kitchen in my room, which was one of the coolest features. I didn’t do any cooking during my stay — my ballpark fare definitely kept me feeling full — but I think this big kitchen would be a helpful feature for many guests:

Normally, a late-August road trip would wrap up the live baseball season for me, and I’d be a little glum on my drive home. This time, I was heading home with lots of feelings of excitement. In just a couple weeks, I’d be heading to the airport for another baseball adventure.

Hartford Yard Goats – August 28

Just one week after wrapping up an enjoyable two-day visit to Troy, New York to see the Tri-City ValleyCats, I was back on the road early on the morning of August 28 and heading down I-90 again. My route took me along a route rich with baseball history — through Syracuse, home of the Chiefs; Utica, former home of the Blue Sox; the Tri-City area, home of the ValleyCats; Springfield, former home of the Giants; and, finally, into Hartford, home of the Yard Goats.

The Hartford Yard Goats are an Eastern League team that is affiliated with the Colorado Rockies, and despite the team joining the Double-A ranks in 2016, this past season was its first in Hartford. That’s because Dunkin’ Donuts Park, the team’s ballpark, wasn’t ready for opening day of 2016, nor was it ready at any point during that season. That meant that the Yard Goats spent their entire inaugural campaign as a road team. I’d hoped to visit Dunkin’ Donuts Park in 2016, but since that obviously wasn’t possible, getting to Hartford in 2017 was a big priority on my to-do list.

I’d scheduled back-to-back games at the Eastern League’s newest ballpark, anxious to see all that it had to offer — and, boy, I wasn’t disappointed.

It took me more than eight hours to drive to Hartford, which meant that I was in a hurry as I checked into my hotel north of the city (more on it later) a little after 3 p.m., dropped off my luggage, and then took the 10-minute drive into downtown Hartford. Just after 3:30 p.m., I parked my car in a $5 lot a block away from the ballpark, and was excited to realize that I could see the park immediately upon climbing out of my car:

The walk to the ballpark was super quick, so just a few minutes after parking, I was standing at the corner of Main and Pleasant streets to capture this shot of the ticket office and front gates:

I spent the next little bit walking around the park’s exterior. There’s not a lot to see immediately adjacent to the ballpark, and I’m assuming that’s because it’s so new. In fact, parking lots pretty much dominate the landscape. I find that this situation is common with newer parks, so it’ll be cool to see what developments pop up in the coming years to give fans more things to see and do before the gates open. That said, the downtown location of the park is excellent, and there are lots of restaurants and other things to check out just a few blocks away. The XL Center, a multipurpose arena shared by the University of Connecticut Huskies and the American Hockey League’s Hartford Wolf Pack, is about a five-minute walk from Dunkin’ Donuts Park, so that’s something that sports fans might want to check out while visiting.

Shortly before I excitedly headed into the ballpark for the first time, I noticed that a coach bus had pulled up on Pleasant Street outside the park’s admin offices. Curious, I walked toward it and as I got to the tail of the bus, the front door opened and the visiting Portland Sea Dogs piled out and walked hurriedly into the park:

The team had been in Binghamton a day earlier to play the Rumble Ponies, and was obviously cutting things a bit close in terms of the arrival time. (Although, I think it’s a bit of a testament to my baseball nerdery that this wasn’t the first time that I’d beaten a team to the ballpark!) Anyway, the players were entering the ballpark via the admin entrance, and that’s where I was going, too. So, I waited for a gap in the line of Sea Dogs and headed that way. There were a bunch of autograph collectors standing along the sidewalk who were flagging down different players to have them sign — you may not be surprised to know that no one misidentified me as a ballplayer and asked for a signature.

Once I picked up my pass, I went through the admin area to get to the concourse, and felt my excitement ramping up a notch as I heard the stadium music and the bats cracking down on the field during batting practice. I made my way across the concourse to the top of the seating bowl, and here’s what I saw:

Not only was it a thrill to be in a brand new ballpark, but this was a bit of a personal milestone for me, too — Dunkin’ Donuts Park is the 65th different ballpark I’ve visited since 2010. (You can click here to see my entire ballpark list.)

I spent about 10 minutes in the top of the seats behind home plate just enjoying the scene. On top of watching batting practice, there was just so much to take in about the new park, and it was exciting to think that I’d be exploring it in its entirety over the next two days. With so many exploratory options in front of me, I decided to return to the concourse and walk down toward the left field foul pole. Check out how empty things still were at this point:

I walked most of the way along the concourse, and then turned right and went down to the front row of the seats to check out the view from there. It was sunny enough that I had trouble picking up balls as they were hit, so I decided to head back to a safer part of the park instead of risk spending my visit to Hartford in the emergency room after taking a line drive in the head. First, though, I noticed this nicely worn Eastern League baseball, so I picked it up, photographed it and tossed it to a Yard Goats outfielder who walked past a moment later:

After walking around an elevated concession stand in the left field corner called Bear’s Smokehouse BBQ, I made it to the left field seats to check out how they looked. I was highly impressed with the layout of this area. Instead of just a standard seating section, there were a few interesting things going on:

First, you’ve got the visitor’s bullpen, and I love just how close fans can get to it. Next, you’ll see multiple rows of bar-style seating. Even though I never sit in one area for too long during my ballpark visits, this style of seating is always something that I love. If I were buying season tickets to a team with a ballpark that offered this feature, this is the type of ticket I’d probably buy.

Before I left this area, I looked over toward right field and was impressed with what I saw:

I’m a sucker for ballparks with eye-catching backdrops behind them, and the buildings in the background on the right field side of Dunkin’ Donuts Park really add to the scene. This is a ballpark that is jammed into the city center, so the office buildings that overlook the park make for a cool feature. I was also impressed with the seats themselves. The upper seats remind me of the right field seats at PNC Park in Pittsburgh, and although there’s no river flowing past these seats, the concourse behind them is a popular hangout spot that was packed with fans during both games I attended.

My next stop during this initial exploration of Dunkin’ Donuts Park was the lower level of seating in the image above. If you notice the white “Right at Home” signage in the above photo, this next photo was taken just above and to the left of it:

This is definitely a unique vantage point for watching a game. You’ve got the home bullpen down to your left, and the deck above you and the small amount of seats in this area give it an intimate feel. This is also an example of a rare time that you’ll see protective netting in front of a section of seats in the outfield; I’m not personally a big fan of protective netting except for immediately behind home plate, but if you’re visiting with children and you want to feel safer, I can definitely understand the netting’s value — even about 400 feet from home plate. And, hey, if it helps to make baseball fans feel safer when they visit the ballpark, that totally makes sense.

I watched BP from this area for a moment, and then returned to the small concourse behind the lower-deck seats in right field, pausing to check out the city scene over the railing to my left …

… and then went all the way to the upper deck, where I finally got my first bird’s-eye view of Dunkin’ Donuts Park:

A unique feature that I spotted from this angle was the somewhat unusual position of the press boxes. At most MiLB parks, the press area is positioned on the suite level (or sometimes on the concourse level) directly behind home plate. Here, though, there are two press boxes on the concourse level — one on the first base side and the other on the third base side. See the gray structure with the tall and narrow windows across it? That’s the third base-side press box. While I can’t speak to how the broadcasters feel about not being directly behind home plate, the press box’s position is pretty fan friendly — if you’re walking around the concourse, you have the ability to stand on the concourse directly behind home plate and watch the game, which isn’t possible at parks that have the press area in this location.

From here, I snapped this shot of myself at ballpark #65:

(As always, I’m wearing one of my T-shirts, which you can buy at this link.)

While I was still in the right field corner, I looked back at the seating situation and took this shot to illustrate it:

See the Budweiser sign above the batter’s eye? That’s a party deck that was absolutely hopping during both games I attended. I don’t think it’s a stretch, based on what I saw, to label this area the most popular spot in the ballpark. In terms of other neat things in this photo, I really like the small seating sections. Small sections, of course, are nothing new at some MiLB parks, but they really work well. Hartford did remarkably well with attendance in its inaugural season, but at larger parks, bigger seating sections that are sparsely populated don’t look very good from afar and can lack the atmosphere that many fans want. When you build a park with smaller sections, they naturally get filled up and have lots of energy. And that was definitely what I found during this visit.

I understandably wanted to see Dunkin’ Donuts Park from the upper level behind home plate, so I continued on my walk. Partway toward home plate, I turned back to snap this shot that shows the bridge-style concourse and the bar-style seating — two noteworthy features on the park’s upper level:

And here’s how things looked from behind home plate:

You’ll notice sections of bar-style seating in the immediate foreground, which was another feature that I really liked. It reminded me a bit of Columbus’ Huntington Park, which also has this type of seating behind home plate. As many of you probably know, I love standing behind home plate at different parks and taking in the view. One day, I’m sure I’ll compile and blog about my rankings of the parks that offer the best view from this area. When evaluating views of this nature, it’s important to not only look at the park itself, but also what’s beyond it. (PNC Park, for example, is often cited as having the best view from home plate in baseball, but much of the beauty that fans get to enjoy comes from the city’s downtown skyline in the distance, rather than from the park itself.) Anyway, this leads me into my one small knock on Dunkin’ Donuts Park, which is the concrete building to the right of the video board. I find that it looks old and stale, and it would be awesome to see some snazzy condos or a building with a little more character there in the future.

If you’re interested in how the suite level looks, I’ve got good news — the next couple photos illustrate this beauty of this area. Here’s a shot that shows more bar-style seating, including rows with stadium seats and rows with bistro-style chairs, which I thought were a nice touch:

And, immediately behind the glass on the right side of the above photo, there’s an enormous dining/hangout area for those with suite access:

This is another spot that was popular during both games — fans were hanging out at the tables and enjoying drinks from the bar, all while being able to keep an eye on the game through the windows.

While I was in this spot, I noticed that the Sea Dogs had come onto the field. Hartford’s BP had since wrapped up, and I wanted to go watch the visiting club get warmed up. I retraced the steps I’d taken just a handful of minutes earlier to end up back in the right field corner, where I had this view:

I watched the players stretch and play catch for a few minutes, and then took the opportunity to explore the upper level of the seats in right field. Here’s how things looked from the end of the concourse behind the seats:

Notice the netting on the right? That’s because there’s a sidewalk and street directly below this area.

Next, I walked toward home plate, stopping midway down the line to take this panorama:

Portland wasn’t hitting, so I watched the warmups for a few minutes longer, and then headed back toward home plate. This time, I went down to the lower seating bowl, where I encountered another cool feature that Dunkin’ Donuts Park offers. Check out this area, dubbed the “Dugout Suite,” and its counterpart on the other side of the field:

This is prime territory at any ballpark, so I’m sure the decision to provide exclusive seating wasn’t a decision that the team and ballpark designer took lightly. After all, there could definitely be dozens of additional seats squeezed into these spots, but the open design really looks awesome, in my books, and gives fans who enjoy suite-style seating but want to be close to the field a perfect spot from which to enjoy the game.

Next, I cut through the seats behind home plate and went down to field level on the third base side. The Sea Dogs were still warming up across the field, but the home side of Dunkin’ Donuts Park was quiet, and that suited me just fine as I enjoyed hanging out and taking in the scene. I also noticed a few balls from BP, including this one …

… and gathered them up and then tossed them onto the warning track in front of the dugout.

If it sounds like I was all over the place during my first visit to Dunkin’ Donuts Park, that’s because I was. Just a few minutes later, I went up to the concourse on the third base side, turning briefly to snap this shot of the right field corner:

I said earlier that I wasn’t a fan of the gray building beyond the outfield, but I absolutely love the look of the right field corner. The buildings add a perfect backdrop, don’t you think?

After enjoying that scene for a few minutes, I continued along the concourse as the gates opened up and fans began to pour in. The fan support for the Yard Goats has been incredible — and considering I was at a late-August weekday game for a team that finished the season 29.5 games out of first place in the Eastern League’s Eastern Division, I was hugely impressed at the turnout and passion of the fan base. Check out how the gates looked as they opened. You’ll admit that this isn’t always a scene that you see in the minor leagues, especially given the above circumstances:

Even though I was excited to continue exploring the ballpark, I figured that it was a good time to eat. I was hungry from my long day, and wanted to eat before lineups formed at the concession stands. For those who might be wondering, there is indeed a Dunkin’ Donuts concession stand inside the park:

But, that wasn’t where I was headed. Instead, I was looking for one of the ballpark’s most notable concession items, which I found at the Dark Blues Diner stand. (The “Dark Blues” name pays tribute to the historic Hartford team of the same name that was actually a member of the National League in 1876 and 1877.)

Ready for this?

I present to you the Dunkin’ Donuts Park BLT, which consists of bacon, lettuce and a slice of tomato with maple mayo, all sandwiched between two DD glazed donuts:

Hashtag cardiology.

While the concept of a sandwich made with donut buns might be nothing new to some, this was the first time I’d ever eaten something like this. I was hugely surprised when the concession worker handed it to me, mainly because I expected to see one donut sliced through the middle to make the two “buns.” This one, however, actually had a full donut as the top bun and a full donut as the bottom bun. It’s a mouthful to eat a pair of donuts at the best of times, but when you add the significant amount of bacon that was on this BLT, it definitely made for a heavy, filling sandwich. I was expecting maybe two small slices of bacon, but the mound on this sandwich was very generous.

Here’s how this bad boy looked when put together:

The good news? I really liked it.

The bad news? I really liked it.

Part of me wondered if this sandwich, which was one of those things that you pick up and have to hang onto until you’re done eating it, would be more novelty than tasty. I was thus surprised at how delicious it was — the sweetness of the donuts, the saltiness of the bacon and (thank goodness) a few plant products really made this a good sandwich. That’s why I say the fact that I liked it was both good and bad news. I was glad I got my money’s worth, as this bad boy was $10, but I’m tempted to try to make one at home myself, which is probably not a good idea.

I ate the BLT at one of the bar-style seats down the first base line, and there were more than a few fans who were rubbernecking as they filed past me. This was the type of ballpark fare that required a few minutes of recovery after eating, so I sat for a short stint after finishing it. When I got up again, I decided to take another lap of the ballpark to encourage a little digestion, and my next stop was over at the visitor’s bullpen just as the starter had completed his warmup:

I watched first pitch and spent the entire first inning in that area, before heading to a seat in right-center for the second inning:

Later on, I enjoyed some of the game from this vantage point …

… and then watched the last few innings of the game from here:

Less than five minutes after the final out, I was back in my car and headed toward my hotel, the Hyatt House Hartford North/Windsor:

Located about 10 minutes from Dunkin’ Donuts Park, the hotel’s prime attraction, for me, is its suite-style rooms. I hadn’t previously stayed in a Hyatt House in the past, but have often stayed at Hyatt Place properties, which feature similar suite-style rooms. It’s nice to be in a room that is larger than a standard-sized room, but is still affordable — and that’s definitely the case with Hyatt House. My room had a full kitchen and living room, in addition to a king-sized bed and a large bathroom area. Other features that guests can enjoy? Free parking and Wi-Fi and a really impressive gym and indoor swimming pool.

By the time I got settled in my room, I didn’t have anything on the agenda other than relaxing. As always, it’d been a long first day of traveling, and I was exhausted. I flopped down on this sofa with a bag of popcorn and a bottle of Snapple (but, alas, no donut BLTs to eat), flipped on the TV and watched some — what else? — baseball:

When it was time for bed, I spun the TV 180 degrees so that it was now facing the bedroom part of my room, hopped into bed and fell asleep watching SportsCenter — anxious to spend another day in Hartford and enjoy another visit to Dunkin’ Donuts Park.