Tagged: Toronto Blue Jays

Toronto Blue Jays – March 26, 2018

My visit to Montreal’s Olympic Stadium in 2017 to see the Blue Jays host the Pirates in Spring Training action arguably goes down as the worst ballpark experience I’ve ever had. Terrible rules, awful food and a stadium that’s nowhere near ready to host professional baseball all made for an experience that lacked the fun that live baseball is supposed to provide. (If you want to read all the gory details, here’s the link.)

As I traveled home from Montreal a year ago, I vowed that I wouldn’t bother visiting “The Big O” again for Blue Jays exhibition action. About a month ago, however, I began to soften my stance. Traveling to ballparks is my favorite thing to do, and the idea of a miserable experience rubs me the wrong way. I found myself wondering if I’d been unnecessarily harsh in my evaluation of Olympic Stadium, and if it were indeed possible to have a good time at one of these games.

All this meant as this year’s Montreal series approached, I began to think seriously about attending again with the goal of rewriting history as best I could — and on the morning of March 26, I found myself sitting in the Ottawa train station waiting to travel to Montreal for my first baseball trip of 2018:

While I normally drive or fly for my trips, the idea of riding the train was appealing from a financial perspective. In addition to being known as having the worst traffic of any Canadian city, parking in Montreal is also expensive. I was looking at paying $25 per day to park at my hotel, and if I were to drive from the hotel to the stadium, I’d be paying another $20 per game. I was pleased to learn that I could buy a return train ticket for under $80, which made this mode of transportation a no-brainer.

I’d driven to Ottawa bright and early on Monday morning and arrived at the station well in advance of the 11:30 a.m. departure time. The train ride to Montreal took only two hours, so I got to my hotel in plenty of time to check in, relax for a bit and then get ready for the game. Since I was on foot, I elected to travel to and from each game on Montreal’s Metro system, and bought a three-day pass that came in handy not only for the games, but also for some sightseeing that I did on the second and third days of my visit.

My subway pulled into the Pie-IX Station next to Olympic Stadium a little before 4 p.m. (If you’re wondering what’s up with the station name, it recognizes Pope Pius IX. I was calling it “pie one ex” in my head, but Montrealers call it “pee nuff.”) The Pie-IX station leads directly into a large atrium type of structure that serves as Olympic Stadium’s lobby. You still have to go through the ticket checkpoint, but you’re essentially in the stadium without being in it, if that makes sense. (No? It doesn’t make much sense to me, either, but that would be the case for a lot of things about Olympic Stadium.) Fans were already lining up in advance of the gates opening at 5:30 p.m., but I wanted to get outside and see this bizarre-looking structure from street level. A year earlier, I’d been so miffed about the horrible no-camera policy that I’d grumpily neglected to walk around the stadium before going in, so I needed to change that this time.

Getting out to the sidewalk meant that I had to go through a security checkpoint the wrong way (more on security later), and fight my way through the crowds that were attempting to get through the checkpoint to get into the stadium. Soon enough, I’d made it to the sidewalk and … realized that there was no way of photographing the monstrous stadium unless I got much farther away. I walked for a couple minutes, turned and took this photo that shows part of the stadium, but hardly provides context:

Simply put, I needed to get farther away. Fortunately, I sound found a ramp that led to another ramp:

It was the type of place that gave me two concerns, given that there was absolutely no one in this area and I didn’t know if it was off limits or not:

  • Would security spot me and tell me to get lost?
  • Would a hobo stab me with a beer bottle?

I’m happy to report that neither took place, which meant that I could keep climbing until I found an open area that provided this view of the stadium:

(I’ll try to avoid a bunch of alien spaceship jokes, but you can feel free to leave ’em in the comments below.)

If you’re wondering about all the climbing that I did to essentially get to what looks like street level outside the stadium, let me explain. The street to the right of the photo, which is where I’d come from a few minutes earlier, is low enough that it’s out of sight. Yet, the street on the left side of the photo is well above where I stood — it basically runs along the base of the treeline. While there are gates directly ahead of where I stood, they were closed and the “main” gates were essentially a full floor below. Make sense?

This area was a blast to explore. Despite the stadium being situated in a busy part of town, and thousands of fans descending on the area as I wandered around, there was just about no one in this area. It’s my understanding that this open area played a big role in the 1976 Summer Olympics, which is the reason that Montreal built the stadium in the first place. We’ve all likely seen the online photos that show how quickly Olympic venues deteriorate in the years that follow the games, and this open space sort of fell into that category. Case in point — these stadium seats around the edge of the open area looked as though they hadn’t been used in a long time:

 

There was a lot of dichotomy to the outdoor space. On one hand, there were the flags of all the nations represented in the games still flying proudly, but the area was so messy and in disrepair (I realize that the melting snow doesn’t help how things look):

Still semi-unsure as to whether someone was going to come and yell at me in French for being in this area, I continued to walk around — feeling a bit like someone on a strange planet. My goal was to take a long lap around Olympic Stadium, so I walked for a moment more and then shot this panorama of the scene:

You have to admit that while there’s no disputing this stadium’s genuine ugliness, it also looks sort of cool. It’s maybe like those weird-looking pets that are so ugly that they’re cute.

I got as close as I could to the side of the stadium to snap the following shots of the cables that hold up the roof:

The cables aren’t just for holding up the roof — they were also designed to move the roof. When Olympic Stadium was designed, it was supposed to have a retractable roof, but that didn’t happen — which was just one of a million construction SNAFUs that the stadium has been through. By the way, that tower that holds the cables is 574 feet tall, making it that tallest inclined structure in the world.

I continued on my walk until I reached a platform above what is essentially the rear of Olympic Stadium. It’s an area with loading docks and looks a bit like a construction site, which I guess is fitting because the stadium has essentially be under construction in some manner for its entire existence. Here’s how this area looked:

OK, so the environment around Olympic Stadium wasn’t exactly brimming with fun things to do, but I’ll admit that I was enjoying making the lap around the stadium — in part because of just how weird the whole thing looks. As you might’ve noticed in the previous photo, I was well above “ground level” of the stadium, even though I was walking on a sidewalk. To get down to the main level, I nervously slipped and slid down a snow-covered embankment, which you can see here …

… until I was safely standing on ground that wasn’t covered in snow — and that’s where I snapped this photo:

Next, I walked through a parking lot until I got to the sidewalk, and followed it back to the security gates through which I’d walked earlier. Now, here’s where it starts to get weird.

This photo shows an atrium area that isn’t technically “inside” the stadium yet:

See where it says “Stade” in the distance? (French for “stadium,” by the way.) Under that sign is the doors at which you show your ticket and get scanned into the stadium. To get to this area, though, you first have to go through a standard set of metal detectors like at any other stadium in the big leagues. They’re outside and out of sight to the right of where I stood to take the image above, and allow entry into the building. The only thing is, if you visit Olympic Stadium by taking the Metro, as I had before deciding to go outside to walk around, there are no metal detectors.

Let me say that again:

There are metal detectors if you come in off the street. There are metal detectors if you come directly out of the underground parking. There are no metal detectors if you take the subway from any point in the city and walk straight into the stadium. And if you’re wondering if you go through metal detectors to get into the subway system, the answer is no. So, this has to be a colossal oversight, right? I kept looking around under the assumption that I was missing something, but I wasn’t. And the next day, the setup was the exact same thing.

Talk about dropping the ball.

All of this had me annoyed not because of a security perspective, but because of the stadium’s inane entry policies. A year earlier, I’d been caught off guard to learn as I attempted to enter that I couldn’t go in with my camera or my backpack — two things that are integral to me when I visit ballparks. This year, I made sure to read up on the policies, and learned that backpacks and “professional” cameras were prohibited. I immediately wrote to the Blue Jays and to the event company to explain my position. The Jays provided no assistance, and while I was able to get someone from the event company to discuss the matter with me, it was about as satisfying as getting spiked at second base while trying to turn a double play. I went back and forth with the rep to explain what I do, to ask for an exemption to this silly rule, to explain that in the nearly 70 stadiums I’ve been to, Olympic Stadium is the only time I’ve ever dealt with this asinine policy and, finally, to argue about what a “professional” camera was. I also pointed out that you can take Hollywood-caliber videos on a smartphone, and that the camera size has nothing to do with how good it is. Eventually, I was essentially told to buzz off, which left me wondering whether I’d obey the policy or try to sneak my camera in — because all stupid rules deserve to be broken.

Not wanting to get turned away at the gate and have to ride the subway back to my hotel to drop off my camera, I elected to leave it behind when I left my hotel earlier that afternoon.

All this to say, had I arrived from the subway with my camera and backpack, and not gone outside to walk around and then come through security, I could’ve walked into the stadium with no problems. The security guards at the metal detectors were the ones who were denying people with backpacks, although they were also waving people through who were wearing backpacks. (To add insult to injury, I literally saw a fan in the stadium wearing one of those hiking backpacks that runs from above your shoulders to your backside. I also saw tons of fans shooting with DSLR cameras.) So, I can only surmise that some of the security personnel took the rules seriously, and others didn’t. Could I have gotten in with my camera and backpack? Probably. But the risk of getting turned away would’ve thrown a major wrench into my plans, so I didn’t want to leave it to chance.

I joined the line about 35 people from the front and waited for close to an hour until the gates opened. There was a palpable excitement in the room, which definitely added to the fun of the moment. (For my part, I was doing my best effort to forget about the stupid rules and just enjoy the experience.) As the gates opened, the excitement seemed to turn to a blend of chaos and confusion. As we walked into the stadium, a lady on a platform was screaming something in French into a bullhorn, which made for a very bizarre experience. I can understand French, but the quality of the bullhorn was so poor that it was impossible to tell what she was yelling. I ignored and quickly navigated my way past her, descended from the concourse to the cross aisle, and ran down toward the left field foul pole to secure a spot in the outfield seats for batting practice. When I got there, this was my view:

In the first five minutes that I was there, no one on the Cardinals hit a single home run. So, I snapped this picture of the cool plastic cup that I’d received upon entering:

It’s one of the cups that you can sync to an app so that the base flashes blue each time the Blue Jays hit a home run all season, and I’m sure I’ll enjoy using it at home throughout the season. Of course, the no backpack rule meant that I had to carry it for the next four hours.

I’d been hoping to snag a Spring Training ball, and the fact that the outfield seats were still sparsely populated meant that I probably had a good chance of doing so, but I also wanted to get exploring the inside of this bizarre stadium. I figured my baseball collection would survive if I didn’t add to it during this trip, so I climbed up to the concourse to get busy wandering around.

You might be relieved to know that as weird as Olympic Stadium is from the outside, it’s just as weird inside. Part of the weirdness is that it’s just so freaking huge. The best way to describe the concourse is that there’s an inner and outer concourse — basically, an enormous concourse that has rooms down the middle to divide it into two lanes. Fans tend to stick to the inner concourse, which is directly adjacent to the openings to the seats, so the outer one is deserted much of the time. Here’s how it looked as I set out to explore:

I can assure you, for the record, that I wasn’t scouting out empty areas and photographing them. There was a steady flow of fans on the other side of the brick rooms that you see on the right of the above photo, but few people seemed to venture out to where I was walking.

I walked the entire length of the concourse, passing behind home plate, until I was behind the right field bleachers. The ultra-bizarre seating setup at the Big O means that you don’t walk right from the concourse to the bleachers. Instead, you take this weird walkway across no man’s land, through the tunnel and then into the bleacher seats:

There were only a couple dozen fans in the right field bleachers at this point — probably because it’s about a gazillion steps from the main gates — so I climbed up to the top row on the center field side and snapped this panorama:

After enjoying the good (the view), the bad (the weird one-armed seats) and the ugly (the random placement of the bullpens) from this spot for a few minutes, my stomach told me that it was time to find some dinner. When I visited in 2017, I didn’t buy any food at Olympic Stadium — and that meant that this time, I wanted to walk around to really get a sense of what might be fun to eat. I skipped the usual stadium fare, in part because the prices were once again ridiculous. The $6.25 being charged for a hot dog made it the most of any stadium in baseball, for what it’s worth. I chose to line up at the Levitt’s smoked meat concession stand. I knew that I wanted to try some smoked meat while I was in Montreal, and a long lineup is generally a good indicator of good food. A smoked meat sandwich, pickle and bottled soda came to $17.75, which seemed a little steep, given the unremarkable size of the sandwich. I carried my meal all the way back to the outfield seats and sat midway up to eat it:

The sandwich itself was completely forgettable — disappointing, considering Montreal’s connection to smoked meat. I’d like to report that at least the pickle was good, but it was so vinegary that I was visibly cringing while eating it. All in all, I was thinking that I was on the right track when I didn’t buy any food a year earlier.

Not long after I finished eating, the pregame ceremonies began. Perhaps the most memorable element was when, with the stadium lights down, everyone’s plastic cups began to flash blue. It made for a cool effect as I looked across the field:

You may have noticed in the previous image that the entire upper deck was dark. Unlike a year earlier, when it’d been possible to buy tickets up there, the upper deck was closed for both games. That was disappointing, because I’d been hoping to get up there and explore a bit. (For the record, I did try, but was thwarted a couple times.)

During the pregame ceremonies, and after the house lights were back on, I took a walk over to the third base side to watch several former Expos get announced and walk onto the field to huge applause. Without my “professional” camera, the ceremony was simply too far away to photograph, so I shot other things — like this image that shows the attendance (about 25,000 on this night) was pretty good, but the barren upper deck was an eyesore:

Keen on seeing the game from several spots, I found a standing-room spot back behind home plate as Jays starter Marcus Stroman made his walk in from the bullpen. As you can really see here, the weird overhang of the upper deck not only makes your seat really in the shadows, but also cuts off part of the video board:

The dark and semi-obstructed views were everywhere. Here’s how it looked from a seat in the upper row down the first base side, where I moved a moment later:

To be perfectly fair, the lower you got, the better the view got. With the obstructions and weird shadows out of the way, the view of the field from a spot like this one was absolutely perfect:

As much as I appreciated the view above, I was still curious to continue to explore the stadium — and to find zany spots to share with you. This next panorama definitely falls into that category. If you thought the outfield seats were far away from the action, how about going behind the outfield seats. Hardly seems to make sense, right? And, yet, here’s where I sat next:

In fairness, there weren’t a lot of fans sitting in this section. As you can see, there weren’t any below me, as I doubt those seats would’ve allowed you to see the field at all, and there were only maybe 30 or 40 fans behind me — including a bunch who were smoking marijuana well within scent of a trio of security guards.

I’ve got to admit that this section was so comically bad that I spent about an inning there. On the left side of the field, you couldn’t see a thing that happened behind the back edge of the infield, but I was still enjoying the sheer bizarreness of it.

After leaving this spot because the smell of smoke behind me was starting to get obnoxious, I spent a little time standing in the cross-aisle behind home plate, moving down to the stairs to snap this shot at one point:

For the remainder of the game, I split my seated time in the outfield seats and in the top row of the lower-bowl seats on the first base side — and I did a lot of random walking, too, to check out the bizarre stadium’s sights. (I’ll have a lot more pictures in my upcoming post about my second game at the stadium.) As soon as the game wrapped up, I quickly hustled out the main gates, through the atrium and down to the subway station, where I caught the first train back to my hotel and was chilling out in my room in time to watch the post-game highlights on TV.

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Minnesota Twins – September 17, 2017

Going into my third visit to Target Field, my mission was twofold — I wanted to make sure to document any sights that I’d perhaps missed on my two previous visits, and to simply chill out for a few innings and enjoy watching some baseball at this gorgeous ballpark.

A pretty good to-do list, right?

This was a Sunday game with an early start time, which meant that I’d have an even earlier arrival time at Target Field. For 7 p.m. games, I find that I have a habit of repeatedly looking at the clock and wanting the day to fly by faster so that I can get to the ballpark. For afternoon games, however, it’s exciting to basically get up, get ready, and head to the ballpark. I left my hotel a little after 9 a.m. and made the short walk over to Target Field. Before going in, I wanted to spend some time enjoying the sights outside the park. The sightseeing began once again in Twins Plaza, where I took in the selection of statues in the area. If you read about my first visit to Target Field, you might recall seeing the Kirby Puckett statue. He’s just one of several former Twins stars honored in this fashion. Another statue depicts the late Harmon Killebrew, a hall of famer and member of the 500 home run club:

Another notable statue that you’ll definitely want to check out upon visiting Target Field is that of HOFer and 18-time all-star Rod Carew, which you’ll find just a short walk from Twins Plaza, over in front of the Majestic Clubhouse Store:

I next took a couple long laps around Target Field, pausing to snap this shot of a Metro Blue Line train on its way to Target Field station:

About 10 a.m., I went inside the park and hung out in the outfield seats, taking in the quiet ballpark in front of me on a breezy, sunny and perfect fall day. It’s moments like this in which I feel a deep sense of appreciation for being able to travel to so many different cities to watch baseball — and also a deep sense of appreciation for everyone who takes time out of their busy days to read about my ongoing adventures.

After the gates opened, I went down to the seats on the third base side. The Twins were warming up along the first base line, and while a lot of fans were scrambling to the front row to get autographs, I was content to hang back and, once again, just enjoy the scene from this sunny spot:

My next stop, the seats in right-center, weren’t sunny at all. This area was fully in the shade, and the autumn breeze made where I stood downright chilly. I snapped this panorama …

… and then headed back to a sunny area where the conditions were a little more pleasant. After watching the Twins warm up for a bit longer, I went over to the third base side to watch the Blue Jays do the same. I was neat seeing the sizable contingent of Jays fans taking in the three games I attended. As I scanned the crowd, it felt as though there was a 50/50 split in people wearing Twins gear versus Jays gear, and the throng of fans was always thick around the visitors dugout before the games. Case in point — here’s relief pitcher Danny Barnes signing some autographs, and just look at all the blue apparel around him:

As first pitch approached, I went back to the outfield seats and watched a parade of families walking along the warning track. Instead of a wide-angle shot of the field, here’s how the scene looked as I turned to my right to watch the parade “highlights” on the video board:

Once the parade wrapped up, I took this shot toward home plate that clearly shows all the different levels of seating in the area:

Something that Target Field does really well is break its seating into smaller sections. This is common at lots of MLB parks, of course, but I really like how this ballpark does it. I don’t need to break down each of the sections, but I particularly like the yellow seats in the middle of the image. I visited this section a handful of times throughout my three games at Target Field, and I appreciated how close they were to the action, but also how much of a bird’s-eye view of the field they gave you. Accomplishing this balance can be tricky — sometimes, you’re too close to appreciate the whole field and, other times, you’re too far away to see the game’s small details — but these seats, which are technically part of the Delta SKY360 Club, are outstanding.

With a bit more time to go before first pitch, I walked over to the plaza inside Gate 34 and watched a bit of the Twins pregame show on the local Fox Sports affiliate:

And then, just in time for first pitch, I grabbed a seat above the third base line, which gave me not only a perfect view of the field …

… but also a nice view of the city’s skyline beyond right-center. I have to also admit that I chose this area partly because I expected that it might be a good spot to snag a foul ball — and, while a few fouls did indeed come up to this level, they were all a couple sections away from me.

About an inning into the game, I was on the move again. This time, I took a spot in the upper deck in the left field corner, where I watched an inning of action:

Next, I set off in search of something to eat. While highly tempted to get another order of the seafood boil, a fantastic dish that I’d enjoyed a day earlier, I wanted to branch out and find something different. Choosing what to eat during the last game at a particular ballpark can be a bit stressful. (And, yes, I realize this is a colossal first-world problem.) I always want to get something that appeals to me, but there are normally a handful of items that fit this bill — meaning that I’ve got to make the right choice. A dish that had caught my eye a few times was the walleye and chips. It seems funny now, but the use of “walleye” really drew me in. Had the menu simply read “fish and chips,” there’s a 100 percent chance that I wouldn’t have ordered this dish. The inclusion of walleye, which is the state fish of Minnesota, made the meal seem a lot more regionally appealing — and it was enough for me to take the bait, so to speak.

I grabbed my order, took it back to a seat not far from where I’d sat for the first inning, and dug in:

The meal was good, but basically tasted like any average fish and chips I’ve ever eaten. The inclusion of the walleye instead of a saltwater fish such as cod or haddock might have been geographically appropriate, but I certainly wasn’t able to taste anything different about it.

I ended up spending the bulk of the second half of the game in this spot. While I usually enjoy wandering around and taking in all the sights, it’s also fun to grab a good seat and just enjoy watching the game. As the game wound to a close, and my third visit to Target Field ended with it, it wasn’t time to fly home just yet. Instead, I’d be spending the final day of my Minneapolis visit getting a chance to tour three of the city’s notable sports venues.

First, though, I was looking forward to spending a quiet evening relaxing in my hotel, the Embassy Suites by Hilton Minneapolis Downtown. This is definitely the hotel that I’ll be booking whenever I visit the Twin Cities again. In addition to its proximity to Target Field, the rooms were absolutely outstanding and among the largest and most impressive I’ve ever stayed in. I wholeheartedly recommend it to baseball travelers planning to see the Twins. I normally only post my own photos on my blog, but the shots that I took in my room pale in comparison to the hotel’s official images, so I can’t resist sharing the latter. Here’s a shot that shows the living room part of the suite …

… and here’s one that shows the bedroom:

After relaxing (and watching some football on that ginormous TV for a bit) I grabbed a sub from Jimmy John’s, which I could see out my window, and then returned to my room to eat, watch Sunday Night Baseball, and then head to bed in excitement of the next day’s adventures.

Minnesota Twins – September 16, 2017

I’m an early riser at home, and that holds true on my baseball trips, too. The way I see it, there’s very little point in lying in bed when I’m in a new city filled with interesting things to see and do.

All that to say, I was up good and early on my second day in Minneapolis and eager to get things started. I decided to begin my day with a walk around the city’s downtown. One of my favorite things about Minneapolis is that you can get virtually anywhere downtown on foot, all without going outside. Nothing against fresh air of course, but the Minneapolis Skyway System quickly became a hit for me. It’s a network of enclosed pedestrian bridges and walkways that link up the buildings over 80 (!!) city blocks. It’s the biggest system of its kind in the world, and I found it exceedingly handy and exciting to use.

I took one of the bridges that connected to the second floor of my hotel, the Embassy Suites by Hilton Minneapolis Downtown, and from it, I could see my hotel on the right and Target Field in the distance. And that’s the Mayo Clinic on the left:

After walking for about 45 minutes, all without going outside, I made my way back to my hotel and had breakfast. One of the things that I really like about the Embassy Suites brand is that breakfast is included with your stay, and it’s outstanding. Each of the four days of my stay, I had ready-made omelets for breakfast, among other things, to ensure that I’d be properly fueled for my adventure.

Speaking of adventure, after relaxing in my hotel room for a bit, I headed off to Target Field. A day earlier, I’d gone straight into the ballpark instead of doing my usual walk around its exterior, so that was atop my to-do list on this day. Check out this panorama that shows just how gorgeous this ballpark is:

There’s a lot going on in this photo. Starting at the far left, you’ll see a parking structure that is connected to the ballpark with one of the Minneapolis Skyway System’s bridges. Below that is North 7th Street, which runs roughly parallel to the first base line. On this side of the bridge is the team shop; despite the size of it, it’s just one level — but the tall ceilings give it a really roomy feel. Next is Gate 29, followed by one of the ticket offices. And, of course, you’ve also got the famous baseball statue. It’s difficult to tell in the above panorama, but the curved markings on the ground make up an enormous Target logo. (There are actually a handful of them on the ground around Target Field.)

Next, I walked around to the corner of North 5th Street and North 3rd Avenue, which is where you’ll find Gate 3:

This is a popular gate for the fans who arrive via light rail, and there are a lot of them. Up the hill on the right side of the above image is Target Field Station, one of the stops on Minneapolis’ light rail system. If you’ve read my post about the first day of my visit, you’ll recall that I was thoroughly impressed with how easy it was to get around the city via light rail, and that I’d taken it from the airport terminal to within a block of my hotel. Target Field Station is where the Metro Blue Line ends, and I think it’s outstanding that you can so easily get to the ballpark in this manner.

Because I’m apparently on a roll with panoramas, here’s another one. It’s similar to the first one that you saw, but taken from farther back:

I like how it turned out, and I also like that the dark clouds soon went away and didn’t interfere with the ballgame!

My last stop before entering the park was Twins Plaza outside Gate 34, which I’d enjoyed checking out a day earlier. In addition to the Kirby Puckett statue, which I grabbed a photo with, you’ll likely recognize the statue called The Golden Glove. It was added in 2010 and recognizes the Twins’ Gold Glove winners. Lots of great names are honored on a plaque next to the glove — Puckett, Jim Kaat, Gary Gaetti, Tony Oliva, Torii Hunter and Joe Mauer, among others.

Even more enticing than the plaque is the glove itself, which is cupped to make it one of the coolest seats in all of baseball. Before games, there’s a lineup of fans waiting to sit on it and have their pictures taken, but I was early enough that no one was around — and that meant I had the glove to myself:

Want one more panorama before we head into the ballpark? Yes? I’m glad to hear it.

Here’s a look at Twins Plaza with Gate 34 in the background — and you can see the glove roughly in the middle of the picture:

Apparently, I was panorama-happy on my second day in Minneapolis, because after getting into Target Field and walking to the concourse behind home plate, I snapped this shot:

The Twins have one darned impressive-looking ballpark, don’t they?

As you can see, batting practice hadn’t yet begun, so I went straight down to field level on the third base side. A day earlier, I’d watched the Blue Jays playing catch, and now I was interested in seeing the Twins. As I made my way down the front row of seats toward the outfield, I saw a baseball that someone have evidently airmailed into the stands, and decided to take an artsy shot of it. I call this one “Baseball on Concrete With Sunflower Seed Shell in Background.”

I didn’t have any noteworthy interactions with the Twins, but I did get to stand behind one of my all-time favorite players, Joe Mauer, and watch him play catch for several minutes …

… before moving toward the infield to watch him field ground balls at first base:

I also had a close-up encounter with ageless wonder Bartolo Colón, who holds distinction for many things, including being the last remaining player from the Montréal Expos to be playing in the big leagues:

After watching the Twins for a while longer, I went over to the visitors dugout for the first time since a day earlier, where I watched a bunch of the Jays get loose.

I also noticed Hazel Mae, the on-field reporter for Toronto’s TV broadcasts on Sportsnet, signing some autographs for fans — including this very happy young man:

I’ve included this mention of Mae because it wasn’t long before she was making Twitter headlines. Later in the game, she was hit in the ankle with a Kevin Pillar foul ball and had to go get some first aid. (A day later, she was back on the field with a crutch.)

During my first game at Target Field’s I’d gazed way up to the Budweiser Roof Deck in the left field corner and pledged that I’d check it out at some point. Now seemed as good a time as any, so I headed toward the left field corner, rode an elevator all the way to the roof deck, and soon had this bird’s eye view of the stadium:

The roof deck, like many of its kind, is reserved for group/private functions. The one booked for this game hadn’t yet begun, but there were several stadium staffers busily getting the area prepared. In addition to multiple levels of stadium seating, the rood deck also had couches, bistro tables and an enormous bar, some of which you can see here:

Upon departing the roof deck, I went back down to the main concourse and made my way over to the first base side, where I snapped the following photo that I want to use to illustrate some of Target Field’s seating situation:

One of the things that really struck me about this ballpark was just how many different spots there were for fans to hang out and watch the game. The above image is looking in just a single direction, of course, but check out how many places there are for fans. The main spot in this image is the upper deck in right-center, and I love how it’s asymmetrical in design. I spent some time in this area during each game I attended, and really enjoyed the view. You’ve got a smaller, more intimate seating section directly below that deck, as well as standing room behind it. Moving toward center field, there’s the ultra-popular Minnie and Paul’s, a pub-style area that you can see directly below the Target Field sign. It’s got tables and chairs and standing-room spots, and is open to all fans. Directly below it is a premium seating area called Catch, which is limited to just 120 seats and includes high-end food with your ticket. And these are just the spots in a single photograph. It seemed as though whatever direction I looked, there were many different spots for fans.

My next stop was the top row of the upper deck on the third base side, where I was anxious to not only see the ballpark from this vantage point, but to also turn my back to the field and check out Target Field Station. As I mentioned in my last post, I took Minneapolis’ light rail around the city extensively during my visit, and while I walked to Target Field instead of traveled to it via light rail, I remain thoroughly impressed with the ease of getting around — and getting to the ballpark — in this city. Here’s a look at Target Field Station from inside the ballpark, and I think you’ll agree that it looks sharp:

In the above image, the video board was showing an advertisement, but was otherwise airing the Twins pregame show, which I thought was a cool touch for fans to see as they got off the train and proceeded toward the gates.

Because I was already in the upper deck, I decided to walk all the way around to behind home plate, where I paused to take in this spectacular view:

All the sightseeing — or was it simply the fact that I’d been keeping my eye on the various concession stand menus as I toured around — had worked up my appetite, so I soon decided that something to eat would be a good idea. Although there were many things that intrigued me, I quickly made my mind up about what I’d be eating. I present to you the shrimp boil:

Shrimp boils aren’t exactly popular where I live in Canada, but I’ve seen them enough online that I’ve always wanted to try one. So, when I scouted out this item on the Target Field menu, I knew that I had to eat it at some point during my visit. At $14.50, this meal wasn’t cheap, but it also wasn’t small. It contained a hefty serving of shrimp, spicy sausage, corn on the cob segments and red potatoes, all tossed with creole seasoning. The verdict, I’m pleased to say, was freakin’ awesome. The variety of tastes and textures, all coated with the spicy seasoning, made this dish a real winner, and one that I had to fight the urge not to order a day later. In fact, it left such an impression on me that when I helped to put together the list for USA Today’s Best Stadium Food competition a couple months ago, I included it as one of the choices.

After eating, I went to check out the Delta Sky360 Club, which is situated at the concourse level behind home plate. It’s got a ton of concession stands, bar-style seating and, most importantly, allows you to walk through the history of the Twins by showcasing dozens of interesting artifacts. This is how the area looks in panoramic form:

See the display cases? Here are some closeups:

I spent a considerable amount of time browsing the hall of fame-worthy collection, which paid tribute to not only the top players and best moments from throughout the history of the franchise, but also to other key moments in Target Field’s history, including the various big concerts that the stadium has hosted over the years.

I ended up watching a couple innings of the action from the seats inside the Delta Sky360 Club, taking advantage of each break between innings to walk over to the artifact displays and browse them for a couple minutes. As the game progressed and night fell, I went back out to the concourse, took a lap of the stadium, and then went outside to snap some shots of it from the exterior. Here’s one in particular that I like:

Soon enough, I was back inside the stadium and looking for a spot to sit for the remainder of the game. I found it in the top row of the upper deck in right center, where I had this view:

Just like a day earlier, I headed out of Target Field immediately after the final out and was back in my hotel room just a few minutes later, eagerly anticipating the Twins day game that I’d be attending about 12 hours later.

Minnesota Twins – September 15, 2017

Since I first saw it on TV back in 2010, I’ve considered Target Field to be one of the best-looking ballparks in baseball. Of course, it’s difficult to authoritatively make that call without a thorough fact-finding mission, right?

Time to make that happen.

Midway through last summer, I decided that I wanted to take another September baseball trip. I’d done it a year earlier, spending three days at Coors Field in Denver, and the idea of fall baseball once again beckoned. This time, I set my sights on the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-Saint Paul for a trio of Twins games on September 15 through 17, plus an awesome day of sightseeing planned for September 18.

The morning of September 15 began early, as the first days of my trips frequently do. I was up about 3:30 a.m. for an early-morning flight to Toronto, fanny pack at the ready as always. I landed about 6:30 a.m. and snapped this shot of my plane midway through my two-hour layover:

Soon enough, I was back in the air and on the way to Minneapolis, where I touched down just before 10 a.m. — gaining an hour because of the time zone difference.

I was fortunate to get a hotel just a few blocks from Target Field, but the fact that the Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport is about 15 miles outside of the downtown area compelled me to plan to rent a car for my visit. Fortunately, the good people at Meet Minneapolis, who were super helpful with my trip planning, talked me out of doing so — they stressed that Minneapolis is extremely public transit friendly, and assured me that I’d be better off getting from the airport to downtown on the city’s light rail system. I’m pretty much a public transit novice. Growing up in a rural area meant that I drove everywhere, and it wasn’t until I was in university that I set foot on my first subway. In fact, I’m midway through my 30s and have still never taken a city bus. All this to say that I was a little tentative about getting around the city via light rail, but I was up to the challenge. It turns out, it wasn’t a challenge at all — Minneapolis’ light rail system was an absolutely breeze to navigate, and I used it several times during my visit.

Several minutes after stepping off my flight and into the airport terminal, I’d found my way down to the light rail station below the airport:

A few minutes later, I was comfortably seated on a Metro Blue Line light rail car and on my way downtown. The ride, which took about half an hour, was really pleasant. I love driving through new cities, but you don’t really get a full appreciation for the sights when you’re carefully watching the GPS screen as much as you’re looking through the windshield. On the train, with my route map in hand, I could take in all of the sights and get a real feel for the different parts of the city. One highlight that was impossible to miss was the enormous U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the NFL’s Vikings and the host stadium of Super Bowl LII. Seeing it, however briefly, was a pleasant tease — I’d be getting a private tour of it on the last day of my visit to Minneapolis!

I hopped off my train at the Warehouse District/Hennepin Avenue station and had about a block to walk to get to my hotel — can’t get much better than that. I arrived at the Embassy Suites by Hilton Minneapolis Downtown shortly before 11 a.m., fully expecting that I’d have to hang out in the lobby and scroll through Twitter for a couple hours, given that I’d arrived well in advance of the hotel’s 4 p.m. check-in time. I’ve learned over the course of my many travels, however, that it’s never a bad idea to let the front desk know that you’ve arrived, even if check-in isn’t for a few hours. I did, and was delighted to learn that my room was ready for me — welcome news after so much traveling. I quickly checked in, grabbed a burger from a restaurant a block or so away, and then headed to a nearby Target to pick up some snacks for my trip.

As I proceeded toward the checkout, I caught a familiar-looking person out of the corner of my eye. Longtime MLB veteran and 1992 World Series winner Pat Tabler, now a color commentator for Toronto’s TV broadcasts on Rogers Sportsnet, headed past me while walking toward the rear of the store. This is a guy I grew up watching, and now see on Jays broadcasts, so I couldn’t resist chasing him down. Lugging my overloaded shopping basket, I caught up to him a moment later and asked if I could take a picture with him:

We talked for a minute or two afterward; I told him that I was from Ontario and grew up watching him, and he told me that made him feel old. He also jokingly chastised me for busting him in the cookie aisle. “Not to worry,” I told him, “I was in the same aisle a few minutes ago, too.”

Highly content with how my visit to Minneapolis had been so far, I walked back to my hotel, unpacked my shopping bags, and relaxed in my room until it was time to make the short walk over to Target Field. I got there just after 3 p.m., which is pretty darned early for a 7 p.m. game, you might think. The Twins were hooking me up with media credentials for all three games, though, which meant that I could get in well before the gates opened — and if you know me, you know I was more than a little excited by this prospect.

I arrived at Target Field through what’s known as Twins Plaza outside Gate 34, which is the gate that you frequently see on TV broadcasts. I was immediately impressed with the look of the entire area. I was early enough that it was still pretty quiet, and that suited me just fine because I could take this photo that shows the scene without a throng of people:

Twins Plaza is definitely a place that you want to visit when you go to Target Field. It’s notable for being home to several statues, including the famous one that depicts hall of famer Kirby Puckett rounding the bases and pumping his fist after hitting his iconic home run in the 1991 World Series. Of course, I had to get a photo in front of it:

Normally, I take at least one lap around the outside of every ballpark I visit, so that would’ve come next. Knowing that I had three days to thoroughly take in all the sights in and outside of Target Field, I decided to put the perimeter tour on hold until a day later so that I could get inside as quickly as possible. I entered via the press entrance, which put me in the open concourse close to where you’d be upon walking through Gate 34. I immediately rushed to the front row of the right field seats to take a look at the field for the first time, and was amused to see the players playing catch with a football — a sure sign of autumn, I guess:

Next, I wandered over to right-center to take this panorama, which shows just how beautiful Target Field truly is:

When I get inside a ballpark for the first time, there’s a temptation to run helter-skelter around and try to take in all the sights at once. It can be tough to tell myself, “OK, you’ve got three days here. Take a nice, slow lap around the concourse for starters to get your bearings.” Fortunately, that little voice in my head won out, so I continued wandering through the outfield seats and all the way past the left field foul pole, where I stopped to snap this picture of myself:

(As you might’ve noticed, I’m wearing one of my custom T-shirts. Want your own? Click here.)

See the players on the field behind me? The Jays pitchers were playing catch, and I watched them from this vantage point for a moment before heading down to field level. You might be wondering about me seeing Toronto on the road: Even though the Jays are my favorite team, seeing them on this trip was pure luck — I only had a couple scheduling opportunities for visiting Minneapolis in September, and the Jays were in town for one of them. Couldn’t pass up that chance. For all the times that I’ve seen Toronto in action, this was only the second series that I’d seen them on the road, funny enough.

Down at field level, I found a spot behind third base, where I simply hung out and enjoyed the scene. It was fun, as always, to watch the players up close, but my attention was more drawn to the beautiful ballpark landscape around me:

Soon enough, the enormous video board began to show different clips and information. At one point, there was live footage of the field. I quickly snapped the following photo because I could see myself (or, more aptly, the few pixels that I knew were me) and I thought it would be fun to share:

As I stood there, players and staff passed back and forth in front of me, going to and from the dugout. Longtime trainer George Poulis, who has since become the head trainer for the Braves, said hello to me as he walked past, while reliever Danny Barnes, who I met way back in 2011 when he was with the Lansing Lugnuts, nodded as he passed me. One player I was keeping my eye (and camera) on was closer Roberto Osuna, and I’m glad that I did. Just a moment after I took this photo …

… he finished playing catch. Instead of carrying his warmup ball to the dugout with him or tossing it into the ball bag, he turned and fired it all the way into the upper deck — like it was no big deal, I might add. I don’t know if he was aiming for this opening — I suspect he was — but his throw sailed through the opening to Section 329, which you’ll see at the bottom left of the deck:

As I watched the ball disappear, I thought, “That’ll make a cool souvenir for someone,” and then thought, “Hey, what about me?” Being at the edge of the infield, I was extremely far away from the upper deck, of course. Getting there would require running back up to the concourse, along the concourse to the foul pole, and up several flights of stairs — and then hoping that a staff member hadn’t scooped up the ball. If you know me, though, you know that I’m always up for a baseball challenge, so I took off in the direction of where I hoped the ball would be.

And found nothing.

I searched, searched, and searched some more, and the ball wasn’t anywhere. There were a couple concessions employees preparing their stand nearby, so I figured that one of them had grabbed it. I figured that at least I got a little exercise out of the quest, and turned to head back down the stairs toward the concourse. Midway down, I stopped and thought about the situation. I couldn’t imagine concession staff caring about errant baseballs, so I figured the ball still had to be there. I ran back up, searched for a few more minutes — including getting down on my hands and knees, and came up with this gem:

I have to admit that I was pretty satisfied with myself as I retraced my steps back down the stairs, along the concourse, and back down to field level. I might’ve even been grinning like a fool.

There were still a few Jays leaving the field when I returned, and I happily stood there and snapped pictures of several of them. Most ignored me, but starter/reliever Joe Biagini looked right at me as I was taking his picture …

… and asked, “How do I look? Good?” I told him that he indeed did look good, and he nodded and continued to the dugout.

As the Jays left the field, the Twins made their way toward home plate to take batting practice. I snapped this shot from a spot above the visitors dugout …

… and then just stood there and watched the action. When the gates opened, I went back to left field to try to snag a home run ball. The lower deck had a moderate number of people trying to snag baseballs, so I went all the way back to the upper deck, where there were just a couple other fans. Of course, upper deck shots are relatively rare, even in BP, but I figured that I’d hang out in this spot for a few minutes to see if anything came my way. It wasn’t long before someone on the Twins — I’m not sure who, unfortunately — blasted a moonshot that landed a few rows in front of me, and I had no trouble dashing down and grabbing it:

I’m always happy to snag a ball during BP, so I dropped the ball in my backpack and headed off to further explore Target Field. My first stop was the press box (no photos there — sorry) to pick up some lineup sheets. I saw Tabler again, and nearly collided with his TV broadcast partner and longtime MLBer Buck Martinez, who hurried out of the broadcast booth and almost walked straight into me. I also saw Twins legend and HOFer Bert Blyleven, who did not circle me.

Speaking of circles, I headed straight for the iconic “Welcome to Target Field” sign below the press box next. Target Field’s press box location is unique in the big leagues. Instead of being on the suite level, it’s immediately above the 200 Level, and there’s a cross-aisle directly below it. One of my pre-visit goals was to get a picture of myself with the Target logo on the wall below the press box, and here’s that effort:

I stood with my back to the Target sign for a few minutes to enjoy the view. From that spot, I could hear the broadcasters in their various booths talking, which provided a nice soundtrack as I took in the perfect scene in front of me:

As I posted on Instagram later on my visit, Pittsburgh’s PNC Park often has a much-deserved reputation as offering the best view from home plate in the majors, but I think that the view at Target Field is certainly no slouch. What do you think?

Next, I went back to the concourse and began a slow walk to take in the sights. Remember the Puckett statue from outside Gate 34 recognizing his game six home run? Well, on the concourse, there was a display featuring the seat in which the home run ball landed:

Returning to the outfield seats at the end of my walk through the concourse, I enjoyed this cool view of the Budweiser Roof Deck above the left field foul pole:

I love how you can see the top of the Ford Center and its water tower just beyond the roof deck. Today, the building provides office space, but it was once one of the locations where Model T Fords were assembled.

As the time ticked down toward first pitch, I spent a few minutes standing in a variety of spots to enjoy the view and atmosphere at the ballpark — high above the field in the seats in right-center, in the area inside Gate 34 and down toward field level in the right field corner, to name a few. Just before first pitch, I grabbed some food and took a seat in the upper deck in left-center. What did I eat, you might ask? Well, I’ll be glad to tell you.

I present to you deep-fried, beer-battered cheese curds:

They were pretty darned good. I’d have liked them to be a little more gooey — the cheese basically still held its shape as I bit into them — but I was glad to add another unique type of ballpark fare to my ever-expanding repertoire.

After eating, I headed to the team shop for the first time, and was immediately blown away by its size and some of its unique features. Case in point, this Twins suit, which could be yours for the low-low price of $740:

Later in the game, I took a seat in the upper deck in right field, stopping to snap this panorama of the area inside Gate 34:

I watched a couple innings of the game from that spot, in part because the view of the field was perfect, and in part because I needed to get off my feet. I hadn’t sat for four or five hours by that point, and was ready to give my feet a little break.

Midway through the game, I grabbed a spot here, where I enjoyed this outstanding view:

I spent the game’s latter innings watching the action from several spots, while also enjoying a few more laps around the concourse to take in all the sights. As soon as the ninth inning drew to a close, I made the short walk back to my hotel, majorly in need of sleep after such a long day:

I crashed pretty soon after getting back to my room, pumped to have finally made it to Minneapolis and excited for the next day’s visit to beautiful Target Field.

Toronto Blue Jays – March 31

Since March of 2014, the Toronto Blue Jays have played the final two games of their Spring Training at Montreal’s Olympic Stadium. Although I’ve been a die-hard Jays fan all of my life, and live closer to Montreal than to Toronto, I didn’t really consider hitting up the series in 2014, 2015 or 2016.

Lately, though, as I get some travel plans figured out for this season, I’ve had baseball travel on the brain — and that led me to make a late decision to attend the March 31 Blue Jays game against the Pittsburgh Pirates. I had a busy day planned for April 1, which meant that I’d need to drive to Montreal in the afternoon, take in the game, and then drive home immediately afterward — getting in at around 2 a.m. Not an ideal scenario, I know, but baseball is baseball. And March baseball is definitely a welcome sight, even if the forecast was calling for six inches of snow that day.

I didn’t have to twist my brother’s arm too hard to get him to accompany me, so I made plans to meet him in Ottawa shortly before noon and make the two-hour drive together. If you’ve read this blog for some time, you might recall that Phil and I have attended games together a handful of times over the years. The most memorable was two summers ago, when we took his three-year-old son to his first baseball game in Ottawa. Phil has also traveled to Cleveland with me in 2011 and Toronto in 2012.

A few days before the game, we bought a pair of tickets in the front row of the upper deck on the third base side for $24, which is expensive enough for the upper deck, but affordable for the rarity of the occasion. As our trip approached, I found myself getting increasingly pumped to see “The Big O,” which would become my 13th different major league stadium and my 64th different stadium in total. I was exciting to thoroughly evaluate Olympic Stadium. As you probably know, there’s a push in Montreal for MLB baseball to return to the city, and I was interested in seeing what shape the stadium would be in.

When we got to Montreal, our first stop was Schwartz’s, which is arguably the city’s most famous smoked meat deli. It’s the type of place that routinely has people lined up down the street at peak times, but we when arrived a little before 3 p.m., we had no trouble getting a seat at the bar. Schwartz’s is truly an old-school eatery — it’s been around since 1928 and it doesn’t look as though the interior has changed much over the years. It’s got a bar running down the right side of the restaurant and tables are crammed along the left side. It’s the sort of place that you have to turn sideways when walking down the row between the bar and tables.

I’d done some advance research about what to order, and the common recommendation I read online was a smoked meat sandwich, fries, dill pickle and a cherry soda, so that’s what we each ordered. You’ll also see a couple hot banana peppers, because why not?

The entire meal was certainly impressive, but not cheap. With a tip, lunch for the two of us was a couple bucks short of $50, which is a little much for a sandwich lunch. That said, the smoked meat was as good as I’ve ever eaten, so I’d advise checking out Schwartz’s if you’re ever visiting Montreal.

After lunch, we made the short drive over to Olympic Stadium, where we opted to park under the stadium for $20. I find that when I’m visiting a stadium for the first time, even things like the parking are a thrill — it’s fun to anticipate the stadium as you make your way from the parking lot to the gates, and that was definitely my mindset here.

Unfortunately, before we reached the gates, we went through the first of several major disappointments that contributed to making my Olympic Stadium experience a real letdown. I’ll say, for starters, that I don’t have an emotional attachment to Olympic Stadium. I wasn’t an Expos fan growing up and I never visited the Big O prior to this trip. I can understand that Expos fans might be sentimental about visiting this stadium and view it differently than me, but I’m simply reporting my observations as a first-time visitor. And, frankly, I wanted to like it. I wanted to tell you that the Big O seemed ready for an MLB club. That it’d be a prime attraction for baseball fans from Canada and the U.S. But I can’t, because that wouldn’t be true.

The first of those disappointments hit me like a slap in the face as we exited the parking garage. It was a sign telling me not only that backpacks were prohibited, but also that cameras weren’t allowed into the stadium. I wish this were a joke. In all my travels, I’ve never encountered problems taking my backpack into a stadium, and certainly have never come across a no-camera rule. Then again, what kind of madman shows up at a sporting event and wants to snap a few photos?

The rule might seem like no big deal, but for what I do, this was majorly bad news. I carry a DSLR camera, two lenses, and a whole host of GoPro equipment with me to capture the scene at each stadium I visit, and this would be the first time I’d ever step foot in a stadium without at least a camera. Thankfully, I was carrying my iPod with me, which means that all of the photos you’ll see throughout this post are from it.

Even though I was hopping mad, I was able to find the humor in this sign, which told me that I’d be in the clear if I were only wearing a “sac banane:”

Unfortunately, though, my fanny pack was tucked away safely at home in anticipation of my next trip by air.

The walkway from the parking garage to the stadium opened into a large room that was absolutely packed with people, as the gates to the actual stadium hadn’t opened yet. I wanted to take a walk around outside for a bit, so we fought our way through the throng of people and out into the chilly Montreal air.

There’s little doubt that the Big O is the most unique-looking stadium I’ve ever seen, so I needed a shot of myself in front of this alien spacecraft structure:

I normally like to spend a long time outside each stadium when I visit, but the combination of snow flurries in the air, challenging sightlines for photos and still being supremely miffed about the asinine backpack/camera rule, we wrapped up our outside tour and headed inside — but not before a weird trip through the security queue.

I was surprised to see no metal detectors in use at Olympic Stadium, given that they’re mandatory in the major leagues and many minor league parks use them now, too. Instead, we just walked past a table, where a guard gave people the stink eye and made them stop if he didn’t like of their jib. Fortunately, our jibs must’ve been all right, because we breezed through the “checkpoint,” got our tickets scanned and made a beeline for the seating bowl:

Despite my earlier annoyances, I was glad to be there and anxious to check out the stadium — and its weird yellowish hue that I remember from Expos TV broadcasts. We snapped a quick photo from the above spot …

… before making a plan to head back to the concourse to walk around for a bit. First, though, I had to take this photo to show you the bizarre shape of the seats:

That’s right — just one armrest per person. Although, I must admit that despite their weird shape, they were comfier than expected.

From the concourse, we were able to see part of the old Olympic park from the ’76 games. In the following shot, you can see a bunch of flags and the Olympic rings over on the left side:

(Of course, it would’ve been nice to take the above photo with my DLSR so that I could zoom in a bit. I’d say that I’m not bitter, but I clearly am.)

The walk around the concourse was interesting, let’s just say. Near home plate, the crowds were thick, but the farther away we got, the concourse was completely empty. See what I mean?

This next photo makes it look as though we’d sneaked somewhere off limits, but I can assure you that wasn’t the case:

After we’d walked through the deserted concourse for a bit, we set our course toward the left field seats. My brother had never snagged a ball at a baseball game, so we thought it’d be fun to hang out for a bit of batting practice, despite leaving our gloves in the car because of the no-backpack rule. The Pirates were hitting plenty of balls into the left field seats, but few that were super close to us. I would’ve potentially had a play on one line drive home run had I been wearing my glove, but I wasn’t going to reach out and risk a broken finger. My brother meanwhile, was showcasing a casual approach to baseball snagging with his hands in his pockets:

In about 10 minutes, we’d failed to snag anything, so we decided to continue our tour. When we left the outfield seats, we got a view that you don’t characteristically see at stadiums — we were way behind the outfield seats, but not anywhere off-limits:

Weird and cool, huh?

Next, we rode an escalator up to the upper deck, where we checked out our seats for the game. They offered this view:

Since batting practice was still on, and my brother was still interested in trying for a ball, we elected to visit the right field seats. They weren’t as full as those in left field, and we’d noticed a fair number of balls being hit that way earlier. So, after a quick stop behind home plate to take this panorama …

… we made our way through yet another deserted concourse toward the right field corner. I should note that the game wasn’t sparsely attended. The game had a posted attendance of 43,180 — it’s just that Olympic Stadium has such a unique layout, and it’s so huge, that you can walk stretches of the concourse without running into anyone — or seeing anyone, for that matter. Here’s how the concourse looked in the upper deck on our way to right field:

When we made it to the seats, I estimated that BP was nearly done. My brother quickly headed to a spot along the fence, while I stood in the aisle about half a dozen rows back and, again, just missed a ball that I would’ve tried for had I been wearing a glove. A moment later, I caught my brother waving at a player and then, to my delight, I saw him adjusting his body for an incoming ball. There were plenty of fans around, but he’s 6’2″ and I knew he’d be able to snag whatever was tossed close. Sure enough, he snatched a toss-up from a Pirates pitcher to snag his first ball:

I had to borrow it for a second, of course, to snap this photo — and you’ll notice that it’s an official 2017 Spring Training ball, complete with the Florida logo:

A moment later, my brother was snapping his own photo to share via text with his wife:

Sure enough, BP concluded about three minutes later, but not before my brother checked which player tossed him the ball. The player turned out to be right-handed pitcher Montana DuRapau, who has since been assigned to Double-A Altoona. (I visited Altoona back in 2012, and you can read about that visit here.) I recognized DuRapau’s name from a few years back. I’d seen him pitch in 2014 when when he was a member of the Short-Season A Jamestown Jammers. I was at the Jammers’ last game in history — the team relocated that off-season — and I included a photo of DuRapau in my blog post about that visit.

Before we left the right field seats, I couldn’t help notice how filthy things were. Look how gross the seats were:

I mean, I don’t need to be able to eat off stadium seats, but I also expect some degree of cleanliness. From the lowest levels of the minor leagues up to the major leagues, you’ll always see ushers feverishly wiping down seats with rags, but that obviously hadn’t happened here in a long, long time. It doesn’t exactly send a message of a stadium being ready to host an MLB team, does it?

Shortly before first pitch, we grabbed a pair of seats behind the right field foul pole to watch the pregame festivities. A number of old Montreal Expos were being honored, highlighted by an appearance from recent hall of fame inductee Tim Raines, who was driven around the field in a cart. This is the best picture I could get:

We watched the first inning from the outfield, and then decided to head up to the upper deck to grab some food and take our seats. Sounds simple, right? Well, apparently not.

First of all, the food prices were ridiculous. Plain, run-of-the-mill hot dogs were $6.25. That would make a hot dog at the Big O the most expensive of any park in the big leagues, and nearly $2 higher than the MLB average price of $4.50. There were no price breaks if you bought combination meals, either — a hot dog, fries and a bottled drink would ring up to $16.25, which was the cost of the three items bought separately. A 355 mL can of Corona? A whopping $11.75! There’s no better way to welcome baseball back to Montreal than by gouging fans at the concessions.

I skipped dinner out of principle; I certainly don’t mind paying high prices if the food seems worth it, but the food quality wasn’t exactly enticing. Around the hot dog stands, there was an off-putting smell of old grease in the air. My brother and I grabbed a couple bottled soft drinks as a dinner substitute and headed to the stands — and were quickly barred from entering because we were carrying bottles. You know, the ones we’d just paid $10 for at the concession stand 10 feet away:

Turns out that you can’t take bottles into the seats, but there weren’t any signs to this effect. Another stadium first for me. Normally, if stadiums are worried about fans throwing bottles, concession workers remove the cap when you buy a bottled drink. You’re then free to carry the bottle wherever you want. Or, you can simply get your soda in a cup.

A semi-apologetic guard sent us back out to the concourse and pointed us in the direction of a concession stand from which we could get cups, fill them with our drinks and go to our seats.

Soft drinks in cups = OK.

Soft drinks in bottles = not OK.

We explained our predicament to the concession employee who conveniently forgot how to speak English. And, when we attempt to break it down to him again, he turned his back and walked away. Awesome.

So, we did what anyone should do when confronted with a stupid rule — we broke it. We jammed our bottles in our pockets and took our seats, where we took clandestine sips like teens sneaking around a bottle of rum at a high school prom.

Having to sneak our sips of soda might seem silly, but it was pretty tame compared to other things we encountered in the upper deck.

  • A “fan” one section to our right was holding up a homemade sign that simply featured the F-word.
  • Fans in front of us were sharing the contents of a whiskey bottle in plain sight of security.
  • There was so much cigarette smoke wafting through the upper deck that I had a sore throat by the time we left. And, yes, Olympic Stadium is a non-smoking venue.

It was a bit like the wild west up there. And, hilariously, security was all over us for our bottles, but apparently had no problem with the above issues.

Still, all these issues didn’t prevent us from enjoying watching the actual game. Our seats gave us a nice view of the field, which you can see here in panoramic form:

We also had a good view of the interesting setup beyond the left field fence:

Those are the stands that we’d previously visited, but you’ll also notice the two teams’ bullpens surrounded by some makeshift light stands. The batting cages were positioned behind the batter’s eye — you’ll see a small opening through which you can see some turf, a home plate and the batter’s boxes.

We spent most of the game in our seats and switched to a higher, emptier row midway through just for a little more leg room. The game ended in a tie — another ballpark first for me — and we joined the other 40,000+ fans exiting the stadium through a congested area that looked like this:

That hallway was more congested than Fenway Park when I visited, for the record.

So, to summarize:

  • A ridiculous no camera and no bag policy.
  • Filthy seats.
  • Overpriced, low-quality food.
  • Inability to take bottled drinks into the stands.
  • No enforcement of rules in the upper deck.

Any one of these issues on its own might be easy to shrug off, but for a stadium that would supposedly want to do its best to look impressive in order to drum up interest in baseball returning to Montreal, the Big O fell majorly short. It’s like having a job interview scheduled and deciding to show up without showering or combing your hair and wearing a stained shirt.

In any case, if baseball ever returns to Montreal, another few hundred million dollars will need to be sunk into Olympic Stadium to get it up to par — which will help to keep the stadium right near the top of the list of the most expensive stadiums ever built. (There are conflicting reports as to the exact number, but more than $1 billion has been sunk into the Big O between its construction and ongoing maintenance over the years.)

I’m glad I had the opportunity to check out Olympic Stadium, but I’m in no rush to return. I think it’s the first stadium I’ve ever felt this way about, and that’s saying something.

Toronto Blue Jays – June 21

I try to visit Rogers Centre every two years, which means that after not seeing a game at the stadium since the spring of 2013, I was way overdue to travel to Toronto.

Time to do something about that.

For this visit, I think I was more excited about the hotel I’d be visiting than the game itself, despite being a longtime Blue Jays fan. That’s because I had one night booked at the Delta Toronto, which is one of the city’s newest hotels and the tallest hotel in the Toronto skyline. Even more importantly, it’s located about a Jose Bautista home run distance from Rogers Centre, and the ballpark-facing room photos that I’d obsessively browsed online offered as impressive a view as I’ve ever had from a hotel. (And, if you know me, you know one of my very favorite things is a hotel from which you can see the ballpark.)

I opted to take the train to Toronto instead of drive, as I was swamped with work and sitting on the train would allow me to get caught up on some writing during the trip. The VIA Rail train arrives at Toronto’s Union Station, which is the city’s central travel hub downtown, and I was pleased to see that I could actually access the Delta through a series of walkways and pedestrian bridges.

Anyway, I arrived super early, as I was hoping to get into my room before check-in, and I wanted to give myself some time to check out the new hotel and tour the area around it, too. When I passed through a walkway from Union Station to the Delta, I found my path blocked by a large group of men stretching on the floor — I quickly noticed that they were all wearing Vancouver Whitecaps uniforms, and were obviously doing their pregame stretching routine at the hotel before playing Toronto FC in Major League Soccer action later that afternoon. Always a good sign when a major league sports franchise is staying in the hotel you’re visiting, right?

My early arrival meant that my room wasn’t quite ready, so the front desk clerk asked if I wanted to visit the exclusive Club Lounge on the 46th floor while I waited. Umm, that was a no brainer!

When I reached the lounge, I rushed to the window to check out the view, and this is what I saw:

delta-toronto-club-lounge-view

How’s that for incredible? The focal points, of course, are Rogers Centre and the CN Tower, but you can also see Ripley’s Aquarium, Roundhouse Park and a whole lot more. See the island on the left? That’s the tip of the Toronto Islands, home to Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. And, since I love my panoramas, here’s the same view in panoramic format:

delta-toronto-club-lounge-view-pano

While the view was the main attraction, the lounge was outstanding, too. Here’s how it looks:

delta-toronto-club-lounge-inside

With the exception of an attendant and a couple people working on laptops, the lounge was empty, so I toured around it and learned that there were complimentary drinks and snacks — including red licorice, which I may or may not have overindulged in. It was cool being so high off the ground; I don’t think I’ve ever stayed in a hotel so tall, so I had a blast looking out the floor-to-ceiling windows and identifying the sights below that I recognized.

Soon enough, I was called because my room was now available, and I was in for even more of a treat. Here’s a photo of how my room looked; this shot is off the hotel’s website because it looks better than the ones I took:

delta-toronto-room

I’ve been lucky to stay in some outstanding hotels over the years, and this room is easily on the shortlist of the very best, both in terms of in-room amenities and view. My room was on the same side of the building as the lounge I’d just left, so the view was similar, albeit with a lower vantage point as it was on the 33rd floor. Here’s the view from the desk, which I took just after the dome started to open:

delta-toronto-view-dome-opening

Would you like to see a dozen or so shots of the dome in various states of opening? No? Fine, I’ll respect that. (But I’ve got the photos ready if you want to see ’em.)

I was fortunate to be in a corner room, so I had a spectacular view in two directions. The outer walls were entirely made of glass, truly giving a panoramic feel to the world outside. I normally don’t devote too many words to hotel bathrooms, but this one was outstanding. It featured a soaker tub set up to offer amazing views of the city and lake:

delta-toronto-soaker-tub

I was loving the room, but there would soon be baseball to watch — and even though I’ve been to Rogers Centre a million times, I was still eager to arrive early. So, I quickly changed into my Gregg Zaun shirsey …

malcolm-zaun

… in the hopes of having it autographed by the former Jay and current Sportsnet studio analyst, and headed downstairs. As you could tell from the earlier photos, the Delta is very close to Rogers Centre, making it a perfect choice for baseball fans or those who want to stay in a central area downtown. This is the view from the sidewalk directly outside the hotel:

view-of-rogers-centre-from-delta

When I got closer to the stadium, I turned around and snapped this photo of the Delta:

delta-toronto-outside-view

Then, at exactly 4:36 p.m., I claimed the first spot in line at Gate 2 …

rogers-centre-gate-two-first-in-line

… and began the process of standing there for another 54 minutes until I was able to hustle inside the park. When you enter through Gate 2, which I don’t think I’ve ever done before, you’re in right field. I was the first fan into the second deck seats less than a minute after my gate opened, and I was soon looking at this view:

rogers-centre-second-deck

My plan was to spend 10 or 15 minutes seeing if a BP home run would come my way. I’ve had reasonably good success snagging BP balls at Rogers Centre with minimal effort over the years, and hoped that being in the virtually empty second deck for the lefty hitters might yield some results. Unfortunately, it did not, so I soon began to tour the park and note the changes since my last visit. My first visit was the game-used room of the team shop, which is always a cool place to check out. The prices are beyond ludicrous, but I always get a kick out of seeing artifacts from the team and ballpark. Here’s the rubber that sat under Mark Buehrle’s cleats when he pitched his 200th inning of 2014, for example. Yours for a cool $2,500:

rogers-centre-game-used-rubber

Speaking of pricey, how about a Blue Jays pub table for $650? Buck Martinez books not included:

toronto-blue-jays-table

After opting not to spend three or four figures on anything at the shop, but thoroughly enjoying perusing everything, I went back to the main concourse and headed over behind home plate:

rogers-centre-home-plate-pregame

And, as I made my way over to the third base side, I looked up and could see the top of the Delta poking above the upper deck:

delta-toronto-rogers-centre

Beyond wanting to see the hotel from inside the stadium, I had another reason for heading to the third base side — I wanted to visit the broadcast studio and flag down Zaun for an autograph and a photo. After all, I figured he’d get a kick out of my shirt. To my dismay, he had a rare night off, and a couple other panelists were talking with host Jamie Campbell:

rogers-centre-samsung-broadcast-booth

Argh. Of all the luck.

I decided that it’d be appropriate to quell my tears with some food. Rogers Centre’s food selection has changed dramatically over the years since I started The Ballpark Guide. My all-time favorite concession stand at the park was the Quaker Steak & Lube stand that sold delicious chicken wings, but it’s no longer there. My second-favorite food item was sold at the Shopsy’s concession stand, which has also gone the way of the dodo. (By the way, the sandwich that I’d always get at Shopsy’s was called the Bill Cosby Triple Decker, which I imagine is no longer available anywhere except perhaps a cell block.)

After a full lap of the main concourse to note all the new food selections, of which there were many, I opted for the buffalo cauliflower poutine. It’s a dish that was new for 2016 and had been receiving lots of publicity, so I was curious to check it out. (Plus, I also thought it’d be fun — and rare — to have a veggie at the ballpark.) I grabbed the food and ascended to the upper deck to eat it. Here’s how it looked:

rogers-centre-buffalo-cauliflower-poutine

As I dug in, I was surprised at the lack of fries. The “poutine” label, to me, suggested that there’d be fries at the bottom of the container, but that wasn’t the case. Rather, the pieces of breaded and fried cauliflower made up the bulk of the meal. They were topped with cheese curds, buffalo sauce and fresh parsley. The verdict? It fell into the odd “good but I wouldn’t order it again” category. The fried cauliflower was definitely tasty, but I found there was a lack of variety in this meal. Soon enough, the cauliflower was soggy from the melted cheese and hot sauce, so everything sort of clumped together. I definitely appreciated the meal’s creativity, though — even if it wasn’t something I’d likely order again, it was fun to try something so unique.

The game began as I ate, so I enjoyed watching the first inning from a section I don’t think I’d visited much in the past. Of course, the ever-present Rogers Centre usher had to come over and check my ticket. I had a ticket for a section in the 500 Level in right field, but had stopped in a nearly empty section in left field to eat. For the record, the usher “let” me stay but admonished me to leave the section as soon as I finished eating.

Anyway, it takes more than an overzealous usher to get me down, so I finished my meal, enjoyed the unique view from my seat …

rogers-centre-upper-deck-pano

… and then decided to head over toward my seat in right field.

As I walked through the 500 Level concourse for the first time since 2013, I noticed a change. Ever since the Blue Jays became good again, the 500 Level has once again come alive. In the glory years of the team, the seats in the upper deck were often packed. During the team’s down years, though, many sections were blocked off and several of the 500 Level concession stands remained closed, giving a bit of a ghost town feel to the sections and concourse toward the foul poles. It was nice to see this part of the stadium so lively during this visit, and I imagine it’ll stay that way as long as the team continues to be competitive.

Moving from the 500 Level concourse to the seating area, I did a bit of exploring around to look at some of the varied/bizarre seating options that I hadn’t previously noticed during my Rogers Centre visits. This photo shows the top row of Section 504, which is the first section to the right field side of the video board:

rogers-centre-section-504-seats

I initially thought the seats behind the “504” sign were sort of a cool area, but you might beg to differ if I showed you the view from those seats:

rogers-centre-section-504-view

Ugh.

After watching the game from this section for a bit, I continued to meander around to see the various sights. I noticed my hotel from a different part of the stadium, with the base of the CN Tower visible on the left:

delta-toronto-from-rogers-centre

My next stop was the WestJet Flight Deck in center field, which is one of the hottest places to catch the game in the entire stadium. Here’s how this party deck looks …

rogers-centre-westjet-flight-deck

… and here’s the view from this area:

rogers-centre-westjet-flight-deck-view

Later, I returned to the team shop as it was a little less crowded, and that gave me a better chance to look at the game-used items. Perhaps the coolest thing I saw there was Roberto Alomar’s glove from the 1992 and 1993 World Series championships:

roberto-alomar-glove

It was, as you might expect, not for sale.

I spent the last part of my visit watching the action from behind home plate, enjoying views like this one:

rogers-centre-behind-home-plate-game

 

I’ll admit, though, that my visit ended before the game’s last out. I’m not typically a fan of leaving a game early, but I ducked out of Rogers Centre a couple innings before the game was over so that I could get back to my hotel room and shoot some time-lapse images of the evening scene. Although it’s tough to beat the idea of being in the stadium, the idea of watching the sun setting over it from an awesome hotel room was pretty appealing, too.

Here’s how that view looked:

At about the midway point, you’ll see the Rogers Centre dome close, which I think looks cool.

I spent the rest of the evening enjoying the outstanding view, occasionally peering down at the street 33 floors below …

street-below-delta-toronto

… and then I drifted off to sleep with the glorious scene of Rogers Centre and the CN Tower in front of me. My sleep, however, was rather short-lived by design — I had my alarm set for 3:30 a.m. so that I could get up when it was still dark, set up my GoPro again, and capture the sunrise in time-lapse mode. It was fun to watch the city come to life through my window:

(By the way, if you’d click to give each of those videos a thumbs-up, I’ll send you a virtual high five. Subscribe to my channel and I’ll send a double high five.)

When the sun rose the next morning, I — you guessed it — enjoyed the view some more before having an awesome breakfast at the hotel restaurant and then going back up to my room just to hang out and enjoy the view until it was checkout time. Given the cool corner bathroom, I sat on a stool next to the tub, drank a black cherry lemonade, and just relaxed:

delta-toronto-my-leg

The Delta Toronto definitely provided an outstanding visit, and I wholeheartedly recommend it for baseball fans. You can’t beat the view or the easy proximity to a ton of major attractions, as well as the impeccable guest rooms and top-notch service. It’ll definitely be my choice when I visit Toronto again to see the Blue Jays.

Detroit Tigers – June 5

The first day of my trip to Detroit lasted about 21 hours from the time I got up till the time my head hit the pillow, and it was absolutely awesome. Although the rainy weather was a brief concern on June 4, things were looking a lot brighter when I slid back the drapes of my sixth-floor room at the Hilton Garden Inn Detroit Downtown to see this view on the morning of June 5:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-bright-day-view

As you can see, not a cloud in the sky ahead of the afternoon game between the Tigers and Blue Jays at Comerica Park. The game was set for 1 p.m., when meant the gates would open at 11 a.m. It was a Max Scherzer Cy Young Award bobblehead giveaway day, too, so I wanted to get to the ballpark well in advance to assure I’d be at the head of the line like the day before.

Until that time, I hung out in my great hotel room, did some writing and watched SportsCenter. As I said in my previous post, this is a great hotel for baseball fans visiting Detroit. Not only is it close to Comerica Park, but it’s within a short walk of a ton of restaurants, entertainment choices (the Greektown Casino is just a few steps away) and more. The hotel also has free Internet, two in-house restaurants, an indoor pool and fitness center and earned a 2014 TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence. I know this is the hotel I’ll choose next time I visit the Motor City, and you’ll be pleased if you make that choice, too.

When it came time to make the two-block walk to Comerica, I first wanted to get a picture of the outside of my hotel. In doing so, I briefly lived the life of a rebel by standing here …

detroit-no-standing-sign

… before taking this shot to show the hotel from the street:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown

Surprisingly, when I got to Comerica Park about 10 a.m., there were virtually no fans in sight. I mean, there were a few people buying tickets and taking photos and such, but the gates were mostly sparse:

comerica-park-gate-with-small-crowd

I figured there was no point in standing in the non-existent line for an hour, so I took a short walk to a great memorabilia shop just a few steps from the park. The shop in question is next door to Cheli’s Chili Bar, which is roughly at the corner of East Adams and Witherell streets. If you plan to buy Tigers memorabilia, I highly recommend this spot — everything is a good chunk of change cheaper than the team shops at the ballpark.

After browsing for about 15 minutes, I headed back toward the “big tiger statue” gate, pausing briefly to snap this photo of myself:

comerica-park-malcolm-at-gate

See how I’m wearing one of my shirts with my website’s logo? Just a few minutes later, as I stood in line a few people back from the gate, a college student in front of me said, “Excuse me, but are you from The Ballpark Guide?” I told him I was, and he said he discovered the site the night before while searching for Comerica Park autograph tips. He said he browsed the site (and my blog, I think) for a couple hours! I was thrilled to meet someone who’s used the site, as it’s nice hearing firsthand how people benefit from the information I provide, given the countless hours I put into everything.

As we chatted, the lines behind us quickly began to grow, and it wasn’t long before the scene looked like this:

comerica-park-fans-at-gate

When the gates opened, I grabbed my bobblehead and hustled down to field level to check out the scene. I had a sneaking suspicion that despite it being a day game, the teams would be hitting because they’d missed BP yesterday. Turns out, I was right. And, like a day earlier, I was inside the park a few minutes early. Check out the time on the bottom of the video board:

comerica-park-video-board-day-2

(I only mention the time because gate attendants are normally such huge sticklers for waiting until exactly the specified time to let people in.)

The Tigers were still hitting, and while I would’ve been happy to snag a ball, I wasn’t going to fight too hard for one. I went to the right field stands and just enjoyed the spectacular view, while also taking various photos of players when they were close to me. Here’s the aforementioned Scherzer, for example:

comerica-park-max-scherzer-bp

If you followed my blog back in 2011, you might recall that I got his autograph during my visit to Comerica Park.

The Tigers players weren’t the only ones shagging balls during BP. Here are the kids of Joba Chamberlain and Victor Martinez:

comerica-park-chamberlain-martinez-kids

During Detroit’s BP, I watched jays reliever Sergio Santos throw a long-toss and bullpen session, and then watched starter Drew Hutchison do the same. On his way back across the field to Toronto’s dugout, he walked close to me and I got this photo:

toronto-blue-jays-drew-hutchison

While I waited for the Jays to start hitting, I quickly removed my bobblehead from its package and snapped this photo. Usually, I photograph stadium giveaway items at home, but I thought this backdrop would look cool:

comerica-park-max-scherzer-bobblehead

And, yes, if you’re wondering, the bobblehead accurately reflects Scherzer’s heterochromia iridum.

Because I wasn’t bent on getting a BP ball, I decided to skip Toronto’s session and get wandering around the park. My first stop was the Jungle section …

comerica-park-jungle-rooftop

… followed by the New Amsterdam 416 Club. The flames in the foreground weren’t lit yet, but here’s proof to the story that Babe Ruth loved his alcohol:

comerica-park-new-amsterdam-club-416

After a couple visits to the park’s team shops, including a walk through the two-level shop…

comerica-park-two-level-team-shop

… I was forced to make a pivotal decision that would shape the remainder of my ballpark visit. It wasn’t a decision I took lightly; as Spider-Man said, with great power comes great responsibility.

I decided to make the pledge to be the designated driver for the day:

comerica-park-designed-driver-soda

I kid about it, but this is a great program that more teams should do. You sign up and commit to be a DD, and you get a voucher for a free soda, which is awesome, given the price of drinks at the ballpark. Anyone want to chime in to say if their home park does this? I know Cleveland does it, and Toronto does a classic Toronto version — you sign up and get entered in a draw to win a prize. No free drink, though. Sorry ’bout that.

With my voucher in hand, I headed back to the Big Cat Court to look for a hot dog for what amounted to my breakfast. Turns out there’s a perfect breakfast-themed hot dog, although its name would indicate the opposite. The Late Night hot dog is topped with shredded cheese, bacon bits and a fried egg, and was just what the doctor ordered for me … not a real doctor, though. No real doctor would endorse this bad boy:

comerica-park-hot-dog-fried-egg

Like yesterday, I climbed to the upper deck to eat the hot dog. Unlike yesterday, though, this one wasn’t as tough to eat as the Poutine Dog. The Late Night dog was delicious. I’m not the biggest fan off eggs, but this egg was cooked perfectly and the cheese and bacon came in just the right amounts. And the dog was good and snappy. The breakfast of champions, especially when washed down with my free soda.

After devouring my “breakfast,” I moved to the seats behind home plate, but still in the upper deck, to take a series of photos that would become this panorama. As always, you can click it to make it bigger:

comerica-park-upper-deck-behind-home-plate-panorama

My next mission was to head back down to the main concourse to do something strictly for the story. If you know much about Comerica Park, you’ll know the carousel in the Big Cat Court isn’t the only amusement park-style ride. There’s also a baseball-themed Ferris wheel, and that’s where I soon found myself. Rides cost $2, and as I stood in line waiting my turn to board, I had a horrible realization: I absolutely can’t handle amusement park rides.

Now, I know a Ferris wheel is pretty mild, but I’ve incorrectly assumed that certain rides would be safe in the past, only to lose my lunch. In fact, I thought of my best childhood friend, Lennie, on whom I’ve barfed multiple times. If he’s reading this now, I know he’s thinking, “Oh no, here it comes again.” The only issue was that he wasn’t with me to barf on, so I’d have to share my breakfast with a stranger. I started to feel confident in the fact that the wheel seemed mild, but then realized all that was in my stomach was a soda and a hot dog with a fried egg, cheese and bacon. And, even as I watched the wheel turn at about 0.001 MPH, I thought, “This is trouble.”

No turning back now, though, and when a father and two his two young sons joined me in the car, I thought, “You poor, poor people don’t know what you’re in for.”

As we set off, though, I didn’t feel myself turning green. In fact, after one full revolution, I knew things would be thankfully be OK, and I snapped some photos of the world outside. Here we are well above street level …

comerica-park-looking-down-from-ferris-wheel

… and here’s a look across to the other cars on the wheel:

comerica-park-baseball-ferris-wheel-ride

The ride was great, and I definitely recommend checking it out. Don’t be afraid to give it a shot if you don’t have kids. I pulled off the shadiest move possible — a solo guy on a kids’ ride — so there’s nothing for you to worry about.

After mentally kissing the ground once I stopped off the ride, I hustled down to field level in time for the first pitch, where I took this photo of Justin Verlander dealing:

comerica-park-justin-verlander

I spent the remainder of the inning here, getting photos like this one of Jose Reyes advancing to third on a Jose Bautista single:

jose-reyes-toronto-blue-jays

And Adam Lind fouling off a pitch:

adam-lind-toronto-blue-jays

The weather was absolutely perfect — hot, but perfect. I decided to grab one of my favorite ballpark refreshments, a frozen lemonade, and climb to the upper deck to watch a few innings:

comerica-park-food-frozen-lemonade

I spent five innings in this spot, which was as close to the video board as you could get:

comerica-park-video-board-victor-martinez

This spot gave me a great vantage point for the back-to-back home runs hit by Juan Francisco and Brett Lawrie in the sixth inning, and once that inning wrapped up, I went back to the 100 Level cross-aisle for a few more action shots, like this one of Melky Cabrera taking a hack:

melky-cabrera-comerica-park

With just the eighth and ninth innings remaining at this point, I ventured up to the one remaining area I hadn’t been — the upper deck in right field. Here, I had this spectacular view:

comerica-park-upper-deck-right-field-view

Toronto beat Detroit 7-3, completing a three-game sweep of the American League Central leaders. I was sad to finally leave Comerica Park, but looking forward to getting back to my hotel and relaxing before the eight-hour drive home the next day. First, I stopped at the Five Guys Burgers and Fries just a short walk from the Hilton Garden Inn to grab dinner, and then was back in my room for the evening to soon watch the sun set over the city:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-city-sunset

Because I showed you the nighttime view from my window in panorama form at the end of my previous blog post, here are a couple different photos. This is the back of the video board at night …

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-night-comerica-park-video-board

… and here’s the gate I could see from the hotel. I think the concrete tigers are asleep:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-night-comerica-park-gate

So, what’s next for me? Well, I don’t have any plans completely solidified. My work schedule has been crazy but I’ll definitely be traveling again this summer. I’m eyeing up a couple small trips in July and a longer one in August, and hope to have details about at least the July outings soon. I’ve also got a big announcement about a project I’m working on very soon, so keep your eyes open for that. As always, if you’ve enjoyed reading about my adventures, please check out this page on my website to read about the simple ways you can support my trips.