Tagged: Toronto Blue Jays

Detroit Tigers – June 4

Although it’s my mission to visit as many ballparks across the major leagues and minor leagues as possible as I continue to build my website, The Ballpark Guide, there are times I can’t resist making a return visit to one of my favorite places. I’ve been to 53 different ballparks since 2010, but ever since I saw a pair of games at Detroit’s Comerica Park in 2011, I’ve been itching to get back. You can read about those visits here and here. Fortunately, I had a chance last week to make a whirlwind trip to the Motor City for a pair of Tigers games.

My day began shortly after 4 a.m. and I was on the road just after 5 a.m. for the eight-hour drive to Detroit. To cross into the U.S., I’ve often taken the Ambassador Bridge, which connects Windsor, Ont., with Detroit. It was drizzling and gray for the latter half of my drive on this trip, so I decided to use the Detroit Windsor Tunnel, located just a short distance west of the bridge. After crossing through customs, I entered the tunnel, which gives the illusion that you’re in a different dimension. This picture isn’t Photoshopped or anything, either. This is actually how it looks down there:

driving-through-detroit-windsor-tunnel

When I emerged from the tunnel in downtown Detroit, I had just a few blocks to drive to reach my hotel. I booked two nights at the Hilton Garden Inn Detroit Downtown for a few reasons. I’ve stayed at numerous Hilton Garden Inn locations over my years of traveling for The Ballpark Guide and have consistently had positive experiences. This particular location is one of the top-ranked Detroit hotels on TripAdvisor and its location is ideal. It’s just two blocks from Comerica Park, which you can’t beat. I often love staying downtown when I’m visiting a downtown park. You can’t beat leaving your car at the hotel, walking through the city to check out the sights and then being back in your hotel room after the game when other fans are sitting in traffic.

The Hilton Garden Inn Detroit Downtown has valet parking, so you don’t have to fuss with finding overnight parking in the area. Once I left my car, I checked in at 3 p.m. with the help of one of the friendliest front desk clerks I’d ever met, who presented me with a gift bag as she gave me my room keys. I’m always excited to get up to my room to check out not only the amenities, but also the view, and both delivered big time. Here’s a look at the room:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-room

I’ll have some more details on my room in my next blog post, but you can see that it looks perfect — king-sized bed, desk, huge TV and more. And as for the view, that was perfect, too:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-first-window-view

The large, tan/gray building in the center of the picture is the Detroit Athletic Club, but you can see Comerica Park to the left and right of the club. To the right, you’ll see some of the upper-deck seats and the rear of the scoreboard (complete with the enormous tiger on top) and to the left of the club, if you look carefully, you can see more tiger statues just beside the red-brick building. (This is how much of a baseball nerd I am — analyzing the baseball-centric view out my window.)

Time to check out the gift bag I received upon check in:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-gift-bag

It contained a card welcoming me to the hotel and a variety of tasty snacks that I enjoyed in short order. I still had some time to kill before heading down for the game, so I enjoyed standing at the window and taking in the various sights, many of which I recognized from my visit to Detroit in 2011. Here’s a view, for example, of the legendary Fox Theatre and, to the bottom right of the image, you can see one of Comerica Park’s distinctive gates:

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-window-view-fox-theatre

At about 4 p.m., I loaded my backpack and set out for the short walk to the ballpark. This is the view from the street right outside the hotel’s entrance:

comerica-park-walk-to-park

Football fans will recognize Ford Field on the right, which is home of the NFL’s Lions. Comerica Park is directly across the street, but just out of sight in this shot. Within just a couple minutes, I was standing on the sidewalk in front of Ford Field with this view of the rear of Comerica Park’s video board:

comerica-park-behind-video-board

Despite the rain, I was pretty pumped to be once again seeing the Tigers in person. This time, however, I had even more reason to celebrate — the Tigers, who are my second-favorite team, were hosting the Blue Jays, who are my favorite team. I’ve seen the Jays several dozen times in Toronto, but this would be the first time I’d see them on the road. I wanted to buy my ticket at the ticket office on the other side of the park, so I began the walk down a deserted East Adams Street:

comerica-park-empty-detroit-street

I was happy to once again see the tiger-themed gate at the corner of East Adams and Witherell streets, but dismayed at the noticeable change since my last visit:

comerica-park-tigers-gate

Yep, metal detectors. These safety features banes of existence will be mandatory at MLB parks in 2015, but the Tigers are among a few teams using them this season. Metal detectors aside, here’s what the glorious-looking gate looks like in panorama form. You can click on all panoramas in this post to make them huge:

comerica-park-tigers-gate-panorama

I bought the cheapest ticket available — $12 for a spot on the Jungle Rooftop Bleachers, which is an amazing section at Comerica — and snapped a quick shot of my ticket:

comerica-park-malcolm-ticket

I still had 30 minutes to kill until the gates opened, which meant plenty of time to take a wander around the ballpark and capture the scene. The first shots I took were to build this panorama, which looks quite different that the one I shot back when I visited Detroit this January, don’t you think?

comerica-park-fox-theatre-panorama

And, of course, there were lots of tiger statue photos, like this one …

comerica-park-tiger-statue

… and this one:

comerica-park-tiger-statues

Hard not to say that Comerica Park has the best-looking gates in baseball, right?

I eventually made a full lap around the park, stopping to snap this photo of the General Motors headquarters, which is several blocks away and dominates the Detroit skyline:

detroit-street-gm-headquarters-building

By this time, the gates were soon to open, and I grabbed the first spot in one of the lines in front of the metal detectors. The pavilion around the gate is made up of countless bricks donated by fans and ex-players. You know the drill. Anyway, the bulk of these bricks are fan messages, but when I looked down between my feet, I saw a name that caught my eye:

comerica-park-whitey-herzog-brick

Baseball hall of famer Whitey Herzog played his last season of baseball as a Tiger before a lengthy managerial career, and it was neat to see the name of someone I instantly knew.

I spent the remaining few minutes before the gates opened talking with a couple members of the park’s security team about the metal detector situation. They said the new system was a pain. One actually joked that he should rent a spot in the parking lot, set up a trailer and have a “check your weapon” business: People leave their weapons with him for $10, and then pick them up again after the game.

The crowds around the gate were sparse, despite it being a fan giveaway game. After successfully passing through the metal detectors and being the first fan into the ballpark through these gates, I was handed a Tigers cloth shopping bag:

comerica-park-stadium-giveaway-grocery-bag

(I just informed my wife this bag is too important to use for shopping, and she rolled her eyes and sighed.)

I was thrilled to finally be back inside Comerica Park. As you might have seen if you read my two blog posts from 2011, my second game was postponed due to rain, so I’ve been anxious to return to this park ever since. It was awesome to get to the seating bowl and see the logos of my two favorite teams on the video board:

comerica-park-video-board

And look — it was only 4:57 p.m.! The gates had opened a few minutes early, which never seems to happen.

Since the Blue Jays were starting to filter out of the first base dugout to stretch, I zipped down to field level to take some shots. Here are relievers Todd Redmond and Dustin McGowan kicking off a run together:

comerica-park-redmond-mcgowan-running

And the bullpen staff celebrating after completing a run:

comerica-park-jays-bullpen-warmups

Jays pitching coach Pete Walker, who has one of the better mustaches in the majors today, was just a few feet in front of me:

comerica-park-pete-walker-blue-jays

Once the relievers headed into the dugout, I went that direction, too. Although the dugout was empty, it wasn’t long before Jays TV announcer (and former Jays player and manager) Buck Martinez appeared, and was obviously making a point about the intricacies of pitching to a couple other Toronto reporters:

comerica-park-buck-martinez-dugout

As I hung around the dugout, I had a good, clean view of my theoretical seat for the night in the Jungle section. Check it out:

comerica-park-jungle-rooftop-bleachers

It’s my favorite section at Comerica; close to the action, affordable and a fun, party atmosphere. You can’t beat it, and I definitely recommend buying your ticket here if you’re visiting Detroit for a Tigers game.

Because it was drizzling, batting practice was off. This meant that with about 1:45 till game time, I had a lot of time to spend wandering around and taking in the sights. My first stop was the concourse booth that sells authentic Tigers items, and it was a blast to browse the game-used balls, jerseys and equipment, as well as the myriad signed items:

comerica-park-authentic-autographed-kiosk

One of the staff members was trying to sell me a Victor Martinez signed helmet that was $600.

“Think of it this way,” he suggested, when I offered it was a bit outside my price range. “This time next year, it’ll probably be worth …”

“$400?” I interrupted, making a joke because I knew the direction he was headed before he got there.

“No, $700,” he said, but then admitted, “I have no idea who the player is, anyway.”

After deciding not to part with $600, I began a lap around the park, stopping at the statues in left-center to capture Ty Cobb in his famous spikes-up slide:

comerica-park-ty-cobb-statue

Each park I visit seems to have a different setup for the batter’s eye. At Toronto’s Rogers Centre, it’s a black, slightly tattered screen mounted over some empty seating sections. At Cleveland’s Progressive Field, it’s part of Heritage Park. The batter’s eye at Comerica is made of ivy, but has a walkway directly behind it for fans to pass from left field to right field. It’s sort of a bizarre blind spot:

comerica-park-behind-batters-eye

Here’s a look at the area from the far side, after I’d emerged and was standing in right-center:

comerica-park-outfield-right-side-of-batters-eye

Because I was in the park so early and the crowd was light due to the rain, there was almost no one in the Big Cat Court when I arrived with dinner on my mind. The Big Cat Court is a fun spot; it’s known for the tigers-themed carousel, but the area’s circular design allows for a multitude of concession stands around the perimeter. I resisted the temptation to take a solo ride on the carousel …

comerica-park-tiger-carousel

… and instead headed for the Gourmet Hot Dogs stand. I’d heard about the Tigers introducing some notable hot dogs at the start of the season, and after conferring with a couple fans on Twitter, decided this should be my dinner plan. Take a look at this menu …

comerica-park-food-gourmet-hot-dogs-menu

… and tell me what you’d get. (You can leave a comment at the bottom of this post or hit me up on Twitter.) Against the orders of my future cardiologist, I opted for the Poutine Dog. That’s right — a hot dog topped with french fries, cheese curds and smothered with gravy. As per usual, I took a photo of my food before tackling it. Ready?

comerica-park-food-poutine-hot-dog-1

And, as I’ve done in the past with difficult-to-eat items, took the long climb to the upper deck so I could eat it without making a scene. Once I’d grabbed a spot in the very top row of the stadium, I literally looked at the dog for about two minutes to figure out my eating strategy. I’d neglected to grab a fork, and had no idea how to dig in. But then, it hit me. I opened the end of the cardboard container much like the landing crafts used in the Allied assault on D-Day — history buffs will get the reference:

comerica-park-food-poutine-hot-dog-2

Doing so provided newfound access to the mass of gluttony. Soon enough, the only evidence that remained were a few curds on the ground and, I’m sure, some gravy on my face.

Next, partly to burn off a few of the calories I’d just taken in, I descended back to field level to hang out behind home plate. I can’t stress enough how awesome the Comerica Park ushers are. They’re hands down the best I’ve encountered on my travels throughout the major leagues. At some parks, you’re not allowed to get behind home plate before the game. Not a problem here. And when game time approaches, there’s no mass push to get every fan out of the area. Now, this isn’t to say I try to sneak into a seat at field level, but I do enjoy hanging out on the cross-aisle behind the field level seats. And although there are signs saying that standing is prohibited, the ushers don’t employ the Gestapo techniques common at other parks. Rogers Centre, I’m looking your way. It’s an extra reason to visit Comerica Park. The ushers truly make you feel welcome and you get the sense the team appreciates you buying a ticket. Anyway, here’s where I was standing, just to the third base side of home plate:

comerica-park-malcolm-at-field-level

While I stood in this area, the rain let up and the grounds crew removed the tarp. Success! It wasn’t long before the Tigers started to filter into the dugout. Here’s starter Rick Porcello having a last-minute chat with Tigers pitching coach Jeff Jones:

comerica-park-porcello-pitching-coach

(Check out the giant jar of gumballs in the background.)

I stayed in the front row behind the Tigers dugout during the anthems, getting the opportunity to snap photos of guys like future hall of famer Omar Vizquel, now a coach with Detroit:

comerica-park-omar-vizquel

And manager Brad Ausmus sharing a laugh with Justin Verlander:

comerica-park-ausmus-and-verlander

By the time first pitch came around, I headed over to the first base side, standing in the cross aisle behind the Jays dugout. From here, I was able to get a bunch more close-up shots of the players, but I’ll just share this wide-angle one I took of Porcello delivering to Melky Cabrera:

comerica-park-porcello-pitches-to-cabrera

Cabrera crushed the next pitch into the seats in right field for his ninth home run of the season and celebrated with Jose Bautista right in front of where I was standing:

comerica-park-bautista-cabrera-hr-celebration

Speaking of home runs, I was pumped to get another chance to see Miguel Cabrera in the bottom of the first. He’s probably my favorite current player who doesn’t wear a Blue Jays uniform, so I stayed put to watch his first plate appearance. This was the swing he put on a fastball from R.A. Dickey …

comerica-park-miguel-cabrera-home-run

… and this was the result:

comerica-park-chevrolet-fountain-cabrera-home-run

That’s the Chevrolet fountain in center field going off after the ball landed in the left field stands for Cabrera’s 11th home run of the season. Being so close to home plate when Cabrera made contact, I can unequivocally tell you it sounded different than the average hit. Absolutely incredible power, and a treat to watch.

I moved my position closer to the rear of home plate for the remainder of the inning, enjoying this outstanding view:

comerica-park-home-plate-view-panorama

And then, with the game underway, resumed my travels around Comerica Park. My first mission was to head up to the Jungle Rooftop Bleachers area, not to find my seat, but rather to check out the New Amsterdam 416 Bar, which is new since my last visit. It’s an upscale, bar-style hangout between the Jungle and the right field seats. It’s got a bunch of comfy seating, and even a flaming bar. That’s not what I mean. A bar that flames? That doesn’t sound right, either. Well, just look at the photo and you’ll see some flickers of the flames:

comerica-park-new-amsterdam-club

Next, my travels took me past the Fox Theatre, where I snapped this shot of the sun beginning to set …

comerica-park-fox-theatre-parking-lot-sunset

… and up to the upper deck. From here, I was able to spot my hotel, which I hadn’t been able to see yet. See the Grand Valley State University building? Look right above it and you’ll see a red-bricked building with white window frames. That’s the Hilton Garden Inn Detroit Downtown:

comerica-park-hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-view

I watched a few innings from the upper deck, happy to take a seat after being on my feet for the last four-plus hours. The game was entertaining to watch — after the teams traded first-inning home runs from the Cabreras, the score remained close and I cut the tension by hitting a Little Caesars kiosk and buying a slice of pizza that was hands down the best ballpark pizza I’ve eaten. I couldn’t resist Little Caesars, given the connection to the Tigers. Mike Ilitch, the Tigers owner, got the start of his billion-dollar empire by founding Little Caesars.

Now, this next part might make you hungry, so be forewarned: The individual slices are square pieces so you get that delicious cheese-coasted crust on two sides. As an added bonus, you can get pouches of dried red pepper flakes to sprinkle on your slice. I’m contemplating going back to Detroit just for another piece or seven:

comerica-park-food-little-caesars-pizza

I spent the game’s latter innings in the outfield seats with this spectacular view:

comerica-park-left-field-night-panorama

One of the great features about Comerica Park is its view of the Detroit skyline, which you’ve seen in the previous images. One of my favorite parts of the skyline is the David Broderick Tower, which is characterized by its enormous mural of whales. I could see part of this building from my hotel room and, as I sat in the left field seats, had a great view of it at night over the Comerica Park statues:

comerica-park-city-night-view

The Jays blew the game open in the late innings, scoring three runs in the eighth inning and two in the ninth to claim an 8-2 win. The final out took place at 10:22 p.m. and from my seat below the video board, I had easy access to the final box score:

comerica-park-tigers-jays-final-box-score

The walk back to my hotel was quick and provides another reminder why the Hilton Garden Inn is your best choice if you’re visiting Comerica Park. If you’re a little nervous about walking in the city at night, I can assure you that the walk from the park to the hotel is perfectly safe. Not only are there plenty of cops directing traffic, but you’ll find yourself in a throng of fans for the entire walk.

I was anxious to get back to my room and check out the night scene, and it didn’t disappoint. In the following panorama, you can see not only Comerica Park, but the bright lights of the Fox Theatre and plenty more. What a view!

hilton-garden-inn-detroit-downtown-night-view

I enjoyed the view on and off for the evening and finally got to bed after 1 a.m., or about 21 hours after my day began. A few short hours later, I’d be heading back to Comerica Park for a day game with perfect weather, Verlander on the mound, a return visit to the hot dog concession stand and a whole lot more.

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Snowy Comerica Park

I’ve got just 10 sleeps until my first baseball road trip of 2014, which I’ll be blogging about next week. In the meantime, though, I wanted to share one quick ballpark adventure I had over the winter.

Back in January, my wife and I made a quick to Detroit to see an Adam Carolla stand-up show at the Motor City Casino. I’ve been to Detroit a couple times in the past, including in May of 2011 for a pair of Tigers games at Comerica Park. You can read my fan guide to Comerica Park by clicking on the park’s name in this sentence, and blog posts about those two trips here and here.

Anyway, I’m a huge Adam Carolla fan and since he doesn’t travel to the east side of the continent very often, I couldn’t resist buying tickets. Where does baseball come in, you ask?

Well, first of all, we stayed at the casino hotel and ate dinner at one of its restaurants. From our seats, we could see both Comerica Park, the current home of the Tigers, and the site of old Tiger Stadium. The spot that Tiger Stadium once occupied is now a vacant lot. You probably wouldn’t even notice it, except the flag in center field still stands. I didn’t take my camera to the restaurant, and the dark, gray evening wasn’t very conducive to photos. There’s a great photo on Wikipedia, however, that show exactly what I’m talking about:

tiger-stadium-current-site

See the tall building on the left of the image? That’s the Motor City Casino, and the restaurant is behind the tall windows on the upper floor.

The morning after the show, we set out for the long drive home, but not before taking a drive around Comerica Park. It was neat to see the winter version of the park. Here’s me in front of the statues of Ty Cobb and Willie Horton, which are beyond the outfield fence:

comerica-park-winter-malcolm-statues

And here I am in front of the famous tiger statue at the Witherell Street gate:

comerica-park-malcolm-tiger-gate

The tigers on the side of the building were wearing snow caps:

comerica-park-snowy-tiger-heads

And we could see the snowy field as we peeked through from the sidewalk:

comerica-park-snowy-field

As we stood on Witherell Street, I snapped a series of photos to build this panorama to show the snowy scene looking away from Comerica Park’s gate:

comerica-park-winter-panorama

The building in the center is the historic Fox Theatre.

I really enjoyed my visits at Comerica Park, even though my second game was rain shortened. If you didn’t see the notice on my website last week, I’m excited to say that I’ll be heading back to Detroit in June as part of a road trip. The rest of the dates and cities aren’t confirmed right now, but I can definitely say I’ll be at Comerica to see the Tigers host the Blue Jays on June 4 and 5.

If you enjoy reading about my baseball adventures and want to support them, there are a few ways of doing so, especially if you shop on Amazon. Please take a look at this link to find out how you can support my trips at no extra cost to you — and receive my thanks on Twitter, too!

My First Ballgame

“Would you like to go to a baseball game?”

That question, posed to me the morning of July 2, 1988, is what began my passion for watching live baseball.

I was six years old and a huge Toronto Blue Jays fan, but I hadn’t yet got the chance to see my team play live. On the weekend in question, my family was assembled at the cottage of my maternal grandparents for Canada Day. I imagine we celebrated the holiday with a barbecue, swimming and maybe even fireworks. And I’m sure I convinced one of the grownups to play catch with me. I don’t remember those details, but I do remember my dad, uncle and grandfather asking me early on that Saturday morning if I wanted to see the Jays play.

It took me all of zero seconds to give me response, and we were soon packed into the minivan for the 90-minute trip from the cottage to Exhibition Stadium. I remember thinking it was pretty cool that I was on a guys’ trip — no girls allowed.

I’ve been thinking about that first game a lot lately, and trying to recall specific moments. I remember a handful of notable moments from that day. I’ve been able to fill in the other details with the help of the day’s box score I found on Baseball-Reference.

The Jays were pounded 11-3 by the Oakland A’s. In those days, the A’s 2-3-4 hitters were Dave Henderson, Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire. That year, the trio smashed 98 home runs and drove in 317 runs. Yikes.

I remember lots of home runs during the game, and the box score confirms there were four. Henderson and Terry Steinbach hit home runs for Oakland, while Cecil Fielder and George Bell hit them for Toronto. I remember being ticked off about the A’s home runs and overjoyed with Toronto’s blasts, as any young Jays fan would be.

I also remember Mike Flanagan getting the start for Toronto and laying a total egg. The box score tells me he went 2.1 innings, surrendering 5 hits and 7 earned runs. Truth be told, I actually remember thinking, “I hate Mike Flanagan” while we were driving back to the cottage after the game. The problems of a six-year-old kid, I guess.

Unfortunately, no family photos from that day seem to exist, nor can I find my old ticket stub. I can clearly remember where we were sitting, though. Exhibition Stadium was originally built for football, and the seating arrangement for baseball games could be best described as awkward. Because of the vast football sidelines, the field-level seats when the stadium was configured for baseball felt like they were a mile away, and the seats down the lines were also ridiculously far from the action. We sat in the upper deck way down the first base line; the Internet tells me the seats were benches and the tickets cost $7, but I don’t recall those details.

I don’t remember what we ate, although I’m sure I had a hot dog or some ice cream. I also seem to recall staying in our seats the entire game — a big-time contrast from how I watch baseball now. The souvenir I took home from the game was the team’s 1988 yearbook. It not only brings back memories to flip through it now, but some of the pictures are absolutely hilarious. I carried this magazine around with me for what seemed like a year. In actuality, it probably was, as I didn’t see my second live ballgame until 1989.

Here’s the cover, which shows its age, despite my obsession with keeping things in their original condition:

1988-blue-jays-program-cover

You might notice some light pen marks on the letters “YEAR,” which I vaguely recall making before getting cold feet and stopping short of finishing the whole word.

A lot of the player pages take me right back to 1988. Here’s Fred McGriff, who was hands-down my favorite player of the era:

fred-mcgriff-blue-jays-yearbook-1988

(You can imagine how thrilled I was to meet McGriff last season at Rochester’s Frontier Field during the Pepsi MAX Field of Dreams game.)

Here’s a picture that screams 1980s — Juan Beniquez with a poorly fitting fat, enormous wristbands, super-short sleeves and a gold chain with a home plate-shaped medallion AND a baserunner:

juan-beniquez-1988-blue-jays-yearbook

Remember when Cecil Fielder was skinny? If you watched the Jays in the 1980s, that’s the Fielder you remember:

cecil-fielder-1988-blue-jays-yearbook

It’s hilarious to note that Fielder is listed at 220 pounds here, and the story about him talks about his good hands “for a big man.” If only they’d had a crystal ball in 1988.

Many of the advertisements are downright hilarious — and I imagine even more so if you’re younger than I am. First of all, there are a bunch of cigarette ads throughout the book, which is something you certainly don’t see anymore.

As far as other ads, here’s a full-page ad of a bank bragging that it has “instant teller” machines that are open … wait for it … 24 hours a day!

cibc-1988-ad

There’s also an ad for a state-of-the-art Panasonic VCR. Jealous?

panasonic-1988-ad

And what self-respecting connoisseur of VCRs would find himself without a 1988 Chevrolet Corsica?

chevrolet-1988-ad

Of course, any man about town might mix business and pleasure by taking his “portable computer” to the ballpark:

toshiba-portable-computers-1988-ad

(That last ad might be the best of all.)

That 1988 Jays team went 87-75 but didn’t make the playoffs. It did, however, have one of the best rosters the team has ever fielded. The outfield of George Bell, Lloyd Moseby and Jesse Barfield is unquestionably the team’s best outfield trio of all time, and the infield of Kelly Gruber, Tony Fernandez, Manny Lee and Fred McGriff was also pretty solid. Ernie Whitt and Pat Borders split the catching duties, and the starting rotation was Mike Flanagan, Dave Stieb, Jim Clancy, Jimmy Key and Todd Stottlemyre. The set-up man was Duane Ward and the closer was Tom Henke.

It would be another year before the Jays were bound for the playoffs. That year, the Jays moved from Exhibition Stadium to SkyDome, and I went to a few games and have the programs to prove it. Interested in another post like this? Leave me a comment below and let me know!

Toronto Blue Jays – April 18

The day of my first Blue Jays game of 2013 was long, but awesome. It included an exceptional hotel, tasty chicken wings, fun explorations of Rogers Centre and a ball during batting practice.  That’s the Cole’s Notes version, but if you want to read, oh, about 3,000 more words on the day, please take a look at this link.

I wasn’t hoping to top Day 1 on Day 2, which would again feature Toronto hosting the Chicago White Sox. Instead, my priorities were to write the giant entry you might’ve previously read, wander around my hotel a bit more and enjoy the Jays game that night.

If you read my previous post, you’ll know that I stayed at the Westin Harbour Castle. I described the outstanding view and the treats that greeted me when I arrived in my room, but as for the room, here’s what the TV stand and desk area looked like:

westin-harbour-castle-toronto-room

And here’s a shot from next to the bed — the door you see at the right of the photo isn’t the front door; that’s down a hallway that’s out of sight:

westin-harbour-castle-room

To be honest, my photos hardly do the room justice. If you want to check out the hotel’s official photos, you can click this link.

I’ll wrap up my thoughts on the Westin Harbour Castle by sharing a few final points. It’s certainly one of the top couple hotels I’ve ever visited, and everything about the stay was remarkable. The view and room were wonderful, of course, but the professionalism and courtesy exemplified by every hotel employee I met was notable. At some hotels, the front-desk clerk acts inconvenienced when you check in. Here, I was greeted warmly by everyone I met and truly made to feel special. The Westin Harbour Castle will unquestionably be the hotel I pick during my next visit to Toronto, whenever that may be. I strongly encourage you to make the same choice. A special thanks to Valerie, Bin and Emile for taking the time to say hello and ensure my stay was a perfect one.

In fact, if you plan to visit Toronto this year to watch the Jays in action, there’s an extra reason to choose the Westin. Buy your event tickets in advance and when you call to make a reservation between now and September 2, 2013, mention that you’ve got tickets to a game and you’ll get a special rate as part of the hotel’s Special Toronto Events and Sports Games Offer.

I spent much of the day blogging, but by mid-afternoon, I was wrapped up and wanted to take a short walk outside to see if I could tell which was my 31st-floor room from the park below. It turns out that I had no such luck, but here’s the outside of the hotel:

westin-harbour-castle-outside-view

About 4:30 p.m., I packed up and made the walk over to Rogers Centre again. I decided to take a different route to the stadium this time, and I was rewarded with a cool angle that I’ve never seen as I approached:

rogers-centre-outside-view

There were a handful of people around, but given that the Maple Leafs were also playing that night, the crowds remained thin all evening. After buying my ticket, I took my usual ticket shot:

rogers-centre-blue-jays-ticket

As you can see, I decided to get a 100 Level outfield ticket this time. I stood a heck of a lot during the previous day’s game, and since I’d already explored Rogers Centre extensively, I wanted to spend some time just sitting and enjoying the action on the field. To mix things up, I decided to enter at Gate 4, which is largely unremarkable except for the view if you turn 180 degrees from the gate:

rogers-centre-cn-tower-base-view

Here I am at Gate 4 — if you look closely, you’ll see my in the reflection on the door:

rogers-centre-gate-4-malcolm

Part of the reason I picked Gate 4 is because it enters into the stadium’s 200 Level, unlike my usual entry point at Gate 11. I had success getting a batting practice ball in the 200s a day earlier, and wanted to see if I could get another one. When I entered the 200 Level seats, I was the only fan in the area:

rogers-centre-200-level-seats-empty

Unfortunately, there were no balls to be had, likely because the ushers had collected them before I got there or perhaps because no balls had reached the second deck. I didn’t stay in the area for long. After taking this shot through the left field foul pole (or, more appropriately, foul net) …

rogers-centre-right-field-foul-pole-net

… I zipped down to field level on the visitors’ side, where I had a close-up view of guys like Adam Dunn:

rogers-centre-adam-dunn-white-sox

And manager Robin Ventura and assistant hitting coach Harold Baines:

rogers-centre-chicago-white-sox-ventura-baines

Once BP wrapped up, I took a quick panorama of the view from behind home plate:

rogers-centre-home-plate-panorama

By now, it was time to eat. I’d had sushi for lunch, and while it was delicious, it’s not the type of food that keeps you full forever. This time, I pledged to try something different, and checked out the King Club Carving Table bar area, where I bought a Budweiser-braised top sirloin sandwich:

rogers-centre-food-budwesier-braised-beef-sandwich

It was delicious, but was it good enough to crack my all-time top 10? I don’t think so, but it had a generous serving of tender beef, an onion bun, caramelized onions and horseradish, plus the Bud BBQ sauce. As you might’ve noticed from the above photo, I ate lunch in the outfield and as soon as I downed the last bite, I made my way over to the seats above Toronto’s bullpen where I watched R.A. Dickey warming up:

blue-jays-ra-dickey-warming-up-bullpen

Just before the anthems, I found a 100 Level section in left-center where I could look up to my left and see people in the new 200 Level Outfield Patio:

rogers-centre-200-level-outfield-deck

And when I looked over to my right, I had this view of Toronto’s bullpen staff:

rogers-centre-blue-jays-bullpen

Now, I don’t pretend to be a scout, unlike many baseball fans on Twitter, but Dickey looked awesome during his warmup. He was shaky in two of his first three starts of the season, but he was doing an excellent job at keeping the ball down while warming up with Henry Blanco and I wanted to see if my observation carried over into his start. Sure enough, he was on. Dickey struck out the first two batters he faced, two more in the second inning and had seven Ks while allowing just two hits in his six innings of work. It was the type of performance that should’ve carried Dickey to a complete-game win, but he exited with tightness in his throwing shoulder — yikes. As you can see here, the situation attracted a crowd:

rogers-centre-ra-dickey-shoulder-stiffness-mound-visit

Remember how I talked about new Jays shortstop Munenori Kawasaki in yesterday’s post? I was keeping a close eye on him again. He continued to stretch between virtually every pitch. I like this photo, which shows Emilio Bonifacio, Edwin Encarnacion and Brett Lawrie shooting the breeze while relief pitcher Aaron Loup warms up … all while Kawasaki is, you guessed it, stretching some more:

munenori-kawasaki-stretching

When he wasn’t stretching, he was very animated at shortstop. After each out, he bowed to outfielders Bonifacio and Melky Cabrera …

munenori-kawasaki-bow

… and then struck a pose indicating the out:

munenori-kawasaki-two-outs-sign

He was very entertaining to watch, and while the Jays weren’t quite as exciting (what with their four hits and all), they still managed a 3-1 win:

rogers-centre-blue-jays-win

When I got back to my hotel, I snapped this shot of the city, which shows the Air Canada Centre and plenty of traffic given that the two teams play just a few blocks from each other:

toronto-night-view-from-westin

All in all, it was two awesome days for me and I’m glad to have visited Rogers Centre again. My next trip will be the opposite of a quick two-day event to familiar territory. I’m just putting the finishing touches on it, but I can tell you it will likely begin May 17. I’ll have details soon. Thanks for reading!

Toronto Blue Jays – April 17

With the exception of being away from home, I love everything about my baseball road trips. The ballparks and games themselves are the focal point as I continue to build The Ballpark Guide, but my trips are often full of other fun adventures, like doing interesting touristy things and staying in cool hotels. I’ve driven to and from Toronto countless times, so when I got up at 6 a.m. yesterday to get ready for my second baseball game of 2013, I decided I wanted to get to the city quickly, rather than do some sightseeing along the way. Why?

I can’t deny that I was excited for last night’s game, but I was super excited to check out my hotel. I love staying in hotels, and from the minute I booked a two-night stay at Toronto’s Westin Harbour Castle, I was pumped to check in. I’ve heard about this hotel for years and have always heard it to be a prime spot for baseball fans. Now that I’m here, I can definitely confirm this sentiment.

The Westin is one of Toronto’s nicest hotels and has a prime location right on the shore of Lake Ontario. It’s just a short walk from a number of downtown attractions, which is ideal because parking downtown is expensive and driving downtown can be a hassle, given traffic and the permanent construction in the city’s core. It was easy to find my hotel, though, and I’m rather directionally challenged. It’s just a couple minutes off the highway and before long, I was parked and checking in. As far as the nearby attractions, they’re too many to list extensively. If you’re into fine dining, for example, consider the Westin’s restaurants or take just a short walk to hit dozens of area eateries. There are also at least two grocery stores about five minutes away if you want to load up on snacks for your room. One thing I did before visiting was check out the hotel on Google Maps, and just scroll around a bit to see what’s in the area. If you want to do the touristy thing, the CN Tower, Hockey Hall of Fame and all sorts of shops are just a short walk away.

I was told that I’d enjoy my room, but WOW — I didn’t have any idea it’d be this great! I’m on one of the upper floors and have a lake-facing view. Here’s a shot out my window, although the photo hardly does the view justice:

westin-harbour-castle-room-lake-view

You’re looking at a ferry taking people over to the Toronto Islands, a group of islands just a stone’s throw from the city’s downtown. As a side note, I went over to the islands once — during a Grade 8 trip to Toronto with my school band to play the anthems at the SkyDome. The spot that we boarded the ferry is directly below my window here at the Westin. And here’s another side note that baseball fans will enjoy — in 1914, Babe Ruth hit his first professional home run at Hanlan’s Point Stadium, a ballpark on the island. He was playing Double-A ball at the age of 19 and was still a half-decade away from tearing up Major League Baseball.

Most of one side of my room is made up of windows, so I truly have a panoramic view of the lake and islands. If I look out the window on the right side of the room, I can see Centre Island and Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport:

westin-harbour-castle-centre-island-view-airport

I’m pretty pumped about the view, but the room itself is outstanding, too. But before I get to the room itself, check out what was waiting for me when I got in:

westin-harbour-castle-welcome-note

Yes, it’s a welcome note AND a mini baseball bat filled with baseball-shaped candy! I should explain — since booking this trip late last week, the Westin has been following me on Twitter and knows about my love of baseball. How cool is it that they’d make the effort to find a baseball-themed welcome gift for me? It’s outstanding, but it wasn’t the only thing waiting for me. On top of a nice platter of fresh snacks, there was this:

westin-harbour-castle-stella-artois

My room is about 400 square feet, which is significantly larger than my first apartment. Since I’m staying here two nights, I’ll get to more details about the room and the hotel in my next blog post — I’ve still got some exploring to do!

The gates at Rogers Centre open 90 minutes before first pitch, so I figured I wanted to get to the stadium shortly before 5 p.m. I’d have time to walk around and take some photos, buy my ticket and get a good spot in line. First, though, I toured around my floor of the Westin and looked out the different windows to get varying views of the city. Hockey and basketball fans will like this one:

westin-harbour-castle-centre-air-canada-centre-view

As you can see, I’m right across the street from Air Canada Centre, which is home of the Toronto Maple Leafs and Toronto Raptors. What a view! Soon enough, I made the short walk over toward Rogers Centre. The walk took about 15 minutes; you could do it in less time, as much of that time was spent waiting for street lights to change. It’s a nice walk and if you’re new to the city, gives you the opportunity to walk past the ACC and Toronto’s historic Union Station, as well as walk in the shadow of the CN Tower.

I’ve been to Rogers Centre virtually every year since it opened in 1989, I believe. And regardless of how many times I visit, it’s always exciting to approach the stadium. After crossing the pedestrian bridge over the railway tracks, I looked up to see the stadium’s famous statue called The Audience. (Side note — it’d be nice to see some statues of Blue Jays legends outside the stadium, too.) Whenever I see this statue …

rogers-centre-statue

… I can’t help but recall visiting Rogers Centre (then known as SkyDome) in 1989 for my birthday party. I remember thinking the statue, for whatever reason, was the coolest and funniest thing ever.

There weren’t many people around when I bought my ticket shortly before 5 p.m. and, as usual, I headed toward Gate 11, which is where I like to enter the stadium. Once there, I took my usual ticket shot:

rogers-centre-ticket-shot

I often enjoy taking panoramas of the outside of ballparks, but at Rogers Centre, it’s very difficult to get far enough away and still have a clear view. I kept walking backward and as you can see here, I still couldn’t get far enough away to get the entire height of the park in my frame:

rogers-centre-outside

After embarrassingly tripping on a step (the perils of walking backward while looking through a camera, I guess), I looked to my right and Gregg Zaun walked right past me! He played 16 years in the majors, including a stint in Toronto, and has worked for years as the studio analyst during Jays games. I didn’t want to run ahead of him and snap a photo, so I took this one:

rogers-centre-gregg-zaun-outside

I’ve zoomed in to show his World Series ring, which he won in 1997 with the Marlins:

rogers-centre-gregg-zaun-world-series-ring

How do people feel about the Jays current logo? I love it. I wasn’t a huge fan of the last couple incarnations, so it’s fun to see a logo that I enjoy so much adorning all sorts of things around the park, including many light posts:

rogers-centre-banners-outside

The half-hour or so that I had to wait in line went quickly, and as soon as I entered the stadium, I made a quick turn to my left to head down to the left field corner. This is the route I always take when the gates open; sometimes you can find a batting practice ball here, or just hang out in hopes of catching a ball. I, however, wanted to get an early shot of the team’s new 200 Level Outfield Patio, which has been featured repeatedly on the team’s broadcasts:

rogers-centre-200-level-outfield-patio-far

I’ll have more photos of it later on, but it’s the structure with the railings between the Budweiser and Rogers logos. It’s free for anyone to enter, has nearby bars and a souvenir stand and, most importantly, has three levels of standing room. I figured that given its new popularity, it would be packed during the game. It was, but it was never packed enough that I couldn’t get a spot when I tried.

I often try to get a batting practice ball by hanging out in the 100 Level outfield seats or in the corners at field level. This time, I wanted to go up to the less-crowded 200 Level, so I made the quick jaunt up the dark ramp:

rogers-centre-dark-ramps

Seriously, how dark is this area? If you didn’t know better, you’d swear you were somewhere you shouldn’t be. I know this photo is less than thrilling, but I wanted to show how dark things are without using my flash. Things were brighter and more exciting when I got up to the 200 Level seats, and I took a moment to grab this shot of myself with the White Sox batting practice in the background:

rogers-centre-malcolm-during-bp

I had to be quick; as I hoped, the balls were flying into the 200 Level fairly consistently. While I was standing in this area, I was thinking how I’ve been to Rogers Centre so many times. I don’t want to have my blog posts seem formulaic or mundane, so I decided I should try to take some shots of things I haven’t previously shared. As I looked around, the phone in the Toronto bullpen caught my eye:

rogers-centre-bullpen-phone

I also get a kick out of these three seats; I always see them from afar but this might be the first time I’ve stood right next to them:

rogers-centre-three-single-seats-of

And speaking of being next to things, check out the view to my immediate left:

rogers-centre-200-level-outfield-patio-close-up

Yep, it’s the new standing room area I mentioned earlier. As for Chicago’s BP, catcher Tyler Flowers was putting on an impressive display. He crushed several balls into the 100 Level seats, and before long, blasted this one into the seats just to my right:

rogers-centre-batting-practice-ball

Adam Dunn was putting on an even better performance. He was routinely hitting 200 Level bombs and even hit a handful off the facing of the fourth level; I specifically noticed one hit between the Cito Gaston and Pat Gillick names in the photo below. Talk about power:

rogers-centre-decks-adam-dunn-bp

I decided not to hang out and try to get more balls. I was pleased to get one, so I made a beeline for the new standing room area to my left. I’ve got to say that it’s absolutely awesome. I’ve ranted about the ushers at Rogers Centre in the past, but those watching over this new area seemed really proud to welcome fans to check things out. I took a number of shots, but I’ll share just a few for now. Here’s one taken through the giant “B” in the Budweiser sign:

rogers-centre-behind-budweiser-sign

And here’s one that shows the layout of the area before it got crowded:

rogers-centre-jays-200-level-outfield-patio

As you can see, there are three levels, tables and a number of sections have wooden bars for your food and drinks, or just to lean on. It’s a perfect spot.

The 200 Level has a number of cool additions since I last visited this part of the park. I was excited to see two bars named after former stars Roberto Alomar:

rogers-centre-roberto-alomar-bar

And Joe Carter, although I cringe when I see how they’ve left out a crucial comma:

rogers-centre-joe-carter-bar

After making one complete circuit of the 200 Level, I went down the ramp to check out the team shop. As I mentioned last year during my Rogers Centre visits, the new Memorabilia Clubhouse section is absolutely amazing. It’s full of game-used and game-issued stuff, and the only disappointment was not seeing the club’s two World Series trophies, which were on display here last year.

There was a cool assortment of game-used balls for sale:

rogers-centre-jays-shop-game-used-balls

And other neat things, too. Did you know that for just $800, you can get a broken Jose Bautista bat?

Since I was on the 100 Level, I decided to head over to the Sportsnet studio to watch the pre-game show with Jamie Campbell and Gregg Zaun:

rogers-centre-jays-pre-game-campbell-zaun

I watched most of the show and from there, went over to the first base side during the anthems. Here, I caught my first glimpse of new Blue Jay Munenori Kawasaki, who was called up to fill in at shortstop with Jose Reyes hurt. Kawasaki has quickly become a popular figure in Toronto for his hustle and for bowing after plays:

rogers-centre-jays-during-national-anthem

(More on him later.)

I spent the first inning standing in this general area, where I took the photos to make up this panorama:

rogers-centre-third-base-side-panorama

But by now, my stomach was growling. It’d been a long day and I was ready for something filling. I toured around for a bit, noting the new (and delicious-smelling) food options, but caved and went with my favorite thing to eat at Rogers Centre, the chicken wings at Quaker Steak & Lube:

rogers-centre-food-quaker-steak-lube-wings

After buying my food, I often grab one of the many folding chairs stacked up around the 100 Level and eat while watching the game through the railing. It’s a perfect strategy if you have a 500 Level ticket, as there’s no way you’ll make it up to your seat while your food is still remotely warm. I’ve done this for years, but this year, I was dismayed to notice that the chairs are locked up — see the padlock?

rogers-centre-locked-chairs-100-level

As for the wings, they were delicious and very meaty, as always. I got my usual flavour, Louisiana Lickers … and ordered it in my usual way: “The Louisiana one, please.” I wonder how many people actually say “lickers.” I stood to eat dinner behind the 100 Level outfield seats and after I was finished, noticed that the Jays new-look team has apparently brought all species out to Rogers Centre:

rogers-centre-bear-fan-costume

No big deal; just a guy in a bear costume, enjoying the game. My next stop was the outfield standing room area again, which was considerably more crowded than last time I stopped by:

rogers-centre-200-level-standing-room-full

It wasn’t difficult to find an open spot on the third level, however, and I lucked out because this screen was directly above me:

rogers-centre-stats-board-standing-room

Game broadcasts nowadays are so good that it’s easy to feel at a slight loss for information when you attend games in person. Being able to watch the live game while consulting the screen for stats was baseball heaven!

The view from this area is really good. Photos always make things look a million miles away, but here’s the panorama I took from the area:

rogers-centre-200-level-view-panorama

Late in the game, I decided to watch an inning or two from the concourse behind home plate, partly to watch Kawasaki. He’s a slap hitter who reminds me very much of Ichiro — and it’s not just that they’re both from Japan. Both have an insane dedication to stretching and calisthenics. Both guys routinely stretch between pitches while at bat and while in the field. At one point, the Jays showed a video of Kawasaki performing a handstand during pre-game stretching. As for the stretching, see what I mean?

rogers-centre-toronto-blue-jays-munenori-kawasaki-stretching

Kawasaki had an outstanding at bat while I stood behind home plate. With two strikes, he fouled off at least five pitches until he drew a walk. (He finished 2-for-2 with a walk to boost his batting average to .364.) My favorite picture of him is this one:

rogers-centre-toronto-blue-jays-munenori-kawasaki

Even though I’d bought a 500 Level ticket, I hadn’t quite made the trek up to the nosebleed seats just yet. In the bottom of the sixth, and with the Jays getting pummeled 5-0, I went up to the 500s and had this view of the video board …

rogers-centre-video-board-colby-rasmus

… and this view of the field:

rogers-centre-upper-deck-500-level-panorama

Remember my quest to find new things to photograph? I’ve never noticed it, but the foul poles at Rogers Centre (which are actually netting) are held in place by giant, crane-like arms:

rogers-centre-foul-pole-crane

I spent up until the middle of the ninth inning up in the 500s, and then slipped down to the 100 Level concourse to watch the Jays’ last at-bat. The Sox had tacked on two more runs to make the final score 7-0, which drops Toronto’s record to 6-9. What a disappointing start to the season. Fans are already panicking, and while that’s a little premature, it’s frustrating to see the team faring so poorly early on.

Nevertheless, I’ll be back at Rogers Centre for the final game of the series against the White Sox, and I can’t wait. I’ll be blogging about the game, and more about my stay at the Westin Harbour Castle, in the next day or two. If you’ve recently found this blog, please consider following me on Twitter to keep up to date with all my road trip plans and visit The Ballpark Guide. If you’re planning a baseball road trip of your own, my website has a ton of tips to help you make the most of your ballpark visits. If you find that my website has saved you a few bucks or increased your enjoyment of the game — or if you just enjoy reading about my travels, please consider making a small donation to help the cause. Thank you!

On the Road Again

By now, you may have read my blog post about my first two chilly games of the year at Syracuse’s NBT Bank Stadium. If not, feel free to check out the ginormous blog entry about that amazing day here.

I normally blog about upcoming road trips several days (or weeks) in advance, but this time, I thought it’d be fun to give everyone a little surprise. The plans for this road trip came together very quickly, and I’m excited to say that I’ll be in Toronto tonight and tomorrow night (April 17 and 18) to watch the Blue Jays host the Chicago White Sox at Rogers Centre:

rogers-centre-outside

For those who’ve followed this blog for a long time, you’ll know that I’ve visited Rogers Centre a number of times. I’ve been a Jays fan since I was old enough to understand baseball and Toronto is the closest MLB city to me by far. In fact, since I started The Ballpark Guide, I’ve watched the Jays play at home six times — twice in 2010, twice in 2011 and twice again in 2012. I’m glad to keep that streak intact. If you’re curious to read my blog entries about those games, check out this link and look for the Rogers Centre posts.

I’m excited to get back to Rogers Centre this year to not only check out the exciting, new-look Jays, but to also document all the off-season changes at the park. Sure, any given park changes a bit from year to year, but as you probably know if you’ve been watching the Jays on TV, there’s an awesome standing-room area in the outfield in what used to be the Windows restaurant. Sampling delicious food is a big part of the baseball experience for me, and given that the Jays have sold two of the 10 best things I’ve eaten on my travels, I’m excited to see what other tasty treats I can find. I’m also pumped to try to catch a ball during batting practice, take a ton of photos and, of course, blog all about it here. As an added bonus, I’ll get to see R.A. Dickey pitch during the second game of my trip, too.

I’m also going to be staying in one of the city’s nicest hotels, and can’t wait to check it out and share those details, too. Its location promises to provide some outstanding views, so I’m pumped to see what it’s like. I don’t want to give away too much now, but I’ll have some details about it in my next blog post.

As always, thanks for reading.

Second Annual Top 10 Ballpark Food I’ve Eaten

In February 2012, I wrote a blog post counting down the 10 best things I’d eaten on my travels in 2010 and 2011. I thought it’d be fun to do, but had no idea of the response I’d get. It’s been one of my top three most-read blog posts to date and my ballpark eating exploits even got mentioned in the Dallas Observer! In honor of Opening Day 2013, it’s time to reveal what things I ate in 2012 were good enough to crack the top 10 list.

As with last year’s list, I’m only considering things I’ve personally eaten and this is an overall list, not just a list of 2012 food. Grab your Rolaids and get ready for your stomach to start growling; you might need to grab a bite after seeing this list. In the list below, you’ll see the name of the item, the park at which I bought it and the team that calls the park home. The number in brackets is last year’s ranking; as you might guess, an “NR” note means it’s new to this list.

** When I released this list, I said I’d post an honorable mention item if I reached 200 followers on Twitter. You responded, so here’s the item, as promised. Thanks for all the follows and for all those who retweeted my message about getting to 200 followers! **

Honorable mention: Curverogie – Peoples Natural Gas Field – Altoona Curve (NR)

peoples-natural-gas-field-food-curverogie

I’ve had a number of different types of sandwiches on my ballpark travels, but Altoona’s Curverogie is certainly one that stands out. Introduced to the menu in 2012, it features ham, onions, cheese and an enormous pierogi. As you can see, it was absolutely loaded with ham, and complemented with a nice, crusty roll, it was delicious. It doesn’t quite crack the top 10 because the pierogi was sort of lost among the strong tastes of the ham and onions, but this is still a sandwich I’d buy again and again.

10. Old Bay pretzel – Prince George’s Stadium – Bowie Baysox (6)

prince-george's-stadium-food-pretzel

Although I ate this pretzel way back in 2011, it’s still the best pretzel I’ve ever eaten. A reader of this blog told me that Bowie didn’t sell the Old Bay pretzel in 2012. I haven’t confirmed that, but if so, it’s too bad. If you like a tangy combination of Old Bay, two types of cheese and pretzel dough, this is a real treat.

9. Shopsy’s Bill Cosby Triple Decker – Rogers Centre – Toronto Blue Jays (4)

rogers-centre-shopsys-bill-cosby-triple-decker

Rye bread, corned beef, smoked meat, sauerkraut, cheese and mustard. Mmmm. I tried this enormous sandwich in 2011 and loved it … and then had it again this summer and it was bad enough to slide down five spots on my list. The 2012 version of the sandwich was largely cold, which really didn’t work well. It’s expensive enough that it’s got to be tasty to order, and the verdict is out as to whether I’ll try it again.

8. Clam chowder – Northeast Delta Dental Stadium / LeLacheur Park  – N.H. Fisher Cats / Lowell Spinners (8/NR)

northeast-delta-dental-stadium-clam-chowder

lelacheur-park-food-clam-chowder

We’ve got a tie in the eighth spot on this list! I really enjoyed the clam chowder I had in New Hampshire in 2011, and I’m including the bowl I enjoyed in 2012 in Lowell as a split entry, given that they tasted exactly the same. I had a cold during my visit to Lowell, so the piping hot soup was a welcome relief on my throat. You’ll see above that I had oyster crackers on my soup in New Hampshire, but didn’t bother in Lowell. Still, a really tasty soup for a chilly evening at the park. (Odd how I was sitting in virtually the same spot in both parks, huh?)

7. Steak and cheese sandwich – Fenway Park – Boston Red Sox (NR)

fenway-park-steak-cheese-sandwich

I love red meat, so I’ve had steak and cheese sandwiches at a number of parks. This one was made to order, just like at Subway, which was a nice touch. The bun was soft and doughy, the steak was surprisingly fresh and the addition of hot sauce made this sandwich jump. And, hey, the scenery made this sandwich taste even better.

6. Chickie’s & Pete’s crab fries – Arm & Hammer Park – Trenton Thunder (NR)

waterfront-park-chickie's-and-pete's-crab-fries

Here’s an item that has grown on me since my visit to Trenton last May. I’ll admit I didn’t know what crab fries were, and when I realized they didn’t have anything to do with crab, I was slightly disappointed. But as far as fries go, they were delicious — just the right texture (not bony but not too soft) and the Old Bay was a nice addition. The warmed white cheddar sauce served with them was perfect for dipping, and the portion size was huge, too.

5. Boog’s BBQ turkey sandwich – Oriole Park at Camden Yards – Baltimore Orioles (4)

boog's-bbq-camden-yards-eutaw-street

As I said above, I’m a big red meat fan, but the turkey sandwich I had in B’More in 2011 was outstanding. And meeting 1970 AL MVP Boog Powell at his concession stand was an added bonus. A word to the wise — the horseradish is molten hot. Go easy.

4. Red Osier prime rib sandwich – Frontier Field – Rochester Red Wings (NR)

frontier-field-red-osier-prime-rib

The highest-debuting entry on this year’s edition of the list, the Red Osier prime rib sandwich in Rochester was amazing. I’ll concede that the photo isn’t overly great; I snapped it fast because I wanted to get eating. The prime rib was the best I’ve eaten outside of a steak house and far better than Quiznos prime rib, for reasons of comparison. I’m definitely hitting Red Osier when I visit Rochester again. Thanks to a few readers of this blog who told me to check this item out — you were absolutely right!

3. Quaker Steak & Lube chicken wings – Rogers Centre – Toronto Blue Jays (3)

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Unlike my second experience with the Shopsy’s Bill Cosby Triple Decker, I ate the Quaker Steak & Lube chicken wings again at Rogers Centre this past fall and they were just as good as ever. Hot, meaty and flavorful. There’s nothing else to want in a chicken wing. I went to an actual Quaker Steak & Lube restaurant in Cleveland in 2011 and I’m happy to report the quality of the ballpark wings isn’t any less than at the restaurant.

2. Buffalo chicken macaroni and cheese – Frontier Field – Rochester Red Wings (2)

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The buffalo mac and cheese at Frontier Field was the first thing I ate since starting The Ballpark Guide in 2010, and it remains the second-best thing I’ve eaten. Nearly three years after eating it, I still consider is the best mac and cheese I’ve ever eaten and will have a hard time saying no to it when I’m in Rochester this year.

1. Bo Brooks crab cake sandwich – Ripken Stadium – Aberdeen IronBirds (1)

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The crab cake sandwich in Aberdeen hangs onto the championship belt for another year. As I wrote last year, it’s the type of sandwich you could eat every inning. The crab tasted fresh and didn’t have that gross seafood odor. The tomato and lettuce were a nice touch, the bun was tasty and the Old Bay (which seems to be prevalent on this list) just topped everything off. I wonder if 2013 will finally be the year I find something better at the ballpark.

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